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Old 10-22-2009, 08:08 PM   #1
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Bleeding baseboards - Question


I am rehooking up my heating system and need to bleed it and i have looked to see how to do it but am not sure if i understand some of the posts as the setups don't seem to be similar to mine. If i can explain min can anyone hlep? So here it goes...

After the circulator pump there is a valve. Should i turn this off prior to letting water into the system? After this valve the water goes down the center of the house and then splits left and right where it starts the loops which go back to the boiler into 1 pipe then goes into the boiler. Prior to connecting to 1 piper there are 2 spigots on each side. Is this were i would bleed the system and how would i do this? Also on the spigot fittings there is a scew (Flat head scew) that turns to no end. What is this for?

Any info you can help with would be really helpful!

Thanks

chris

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Old 10-22-2009, 08:20 PM   #2
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Bleeding baseboards - Question


Water coming to the boiler should have a by-pass valve to allow water around the regulator.

I would close that valve and open the water valve that runs to the requlator and let the system fill.

I am not sure what you are calling spigot's

The device that has a screw in the middle may be the manule bleed. On the side is there a small hole. If so then loosing the screw will allow air to escape from the system. Open the screw until you get water for about 2-3 minutes.

Shut off the gas and then and make a call for heat, with the circulator motor open the bleeds again for about another 5 minutes or until no air.

Close bleeds and run the system.

Watch the pressure/temp on the boiler

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Old 10-23-2009, 04:54 AM   #3
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Bleeding baseboards - Question


Post pics.

I think you are describing purge valves/tee's.
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Old 10-23-2009, 05:20 AM   #4
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Bleeding baseboards - Question


Here are the pictures.

You will see the valve after the cirulator pump and above the valve there is the T where the water from the regulator comes in. From there it travels to the loops past the spigots (With the screw in the fitting) then back into the boiler. What is the valve for, that is going back into the boiler? Should i be turning this off for anything.

Thanks for all your help!
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Old 10-23-2009, 05:29 AM   #5
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Bleeding baseboards - Question


Those are purge tee's.

The screw that just turns is a butterfly. Screw slot parallel to the pipe its full open. Perpendicular, its at full restriction(not closed, restriction).

They are used to purge the individual loops.
Generally you need to make sure the auto feed is in manual(lever pulled straight up). While the purge tee screw is turned perpendicular to the pipe. And the spigot(drain cock/valve) is open and a garden hose connected to it.

How long to get all the air out. varies. There is no one set amount of time.
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Old 10-23-2009, 06:23 AM   #6
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I am pretty new to all this and this kind of what i gather from reading.. if i am way off base please let me know.. I am a Rookie!

So what i should be doing is closing the valve above the circulator pump. open on of the purge valves and close off the loops by the butterfly valve. Then allow the regulator to fill the system as it pushs air out?
(I would do the say thing to the opposite loop)
Do i close the valve above the boiler that is coming in?

Once it seems like the air is out close the purge valve and open the valve above the circulator pump then run the boiler. Then go to the baseboards and bleed those after alittle while of boiler running right.

I also, does it make sense to to put in valves in to cut off heat to a particular portions of the house if needed? Since i have the system drained it maybe a good time to do this.

Thanks
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Old 10-23-2009, 10:36 AM   #7
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Bleeding baseboards - Question


Nope.

Only valve to close/restrict, is the purge valve.
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Old 10-23-2009, 01:48 PM   #8
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You will want to isolate the boiler from the loop before pressurizing the loop. Use the available valves or you will over pressurize the boiler and pop the relief.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:01 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SKIP4661 View Post
You will want to isolate the boiler from the loop before pressurizing the loop. Use the available valves or you will over pressurize the boiler and pop the relief.
Shouldn't. Unless he closes the purge drain cocks before flipping the manual fill lever back to automatic.
Or doesn't open the purge drains before he flips the manual fill lever.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:04 PM   #10
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Thanks for the info... i am seeing two different responses on whether to leave the valves open or closed so i am alittle confused!

In the pictures there is a valve after my circulation pump and and valve on top coming into the boiler should i keep them open or both closed or one open and one closed..?

Sorry to be a pain just want to make sre i am completely clear.

thanks.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:19 PM   #11
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Your auto water feed. Looks to be piped into teh return.
If you shut the valves off at the boiler. then you will be feeding water into the return pipe.
most purge valve set ups. Are done to purge fresh water in to the supply, and out the return.
So if yours is set up that way. Closing the valves at teh boiler, will prevent you from purging the system.

Are your purge valves on the supply, or return.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:24 PM   #12
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I want to say on the return lines.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:26 PM   #13
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Then you can't shut the valves off at the boiler. Or it won't purge right, if at all.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:29 PM   #14
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Actually i am not sure... does the circulation pump pull water out? or push it through the boiler? If it pushes it through the boiler then the purge valves are on the feeding line but if it pulls water through the boiler then its on the return.
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Old 10-23-2009, 03:39 PM   #15
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It can be installed either way.

Look for the arrow on the circ for direction of water flow. Then you know which way its moving it.

I don't see it in the pics. So I am guessing your is on the return side, pumping water into the boiler

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