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Old 02-02-2014, 12:44 PM   #1
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Basement remodel


Hello, I just became a new member. I appreciate any help you folks can give me. I am finishing some basement space. We live in Minnesota, so temps go to both extremes. Two rooms total, one room 20' by 24'. Second room 13' by 21'. All outside walls are insulated. The two rooms are separated by an open 5' door opening. Will not be installing doors in that space. There is one supply in the 20'x24' room. The basement feels comfortable to me all year round. My question is what issues will I run into when I close these two rooms up. There is no returns in either space. Is there a rule of thumb as to the number of supplys and returns that need to be installed. As I said basement feels comfortable all year round and the amount of time spent downstairs will be minimal. I also do not want to run into any moisture issues. There is a vapor barrier on the concrete behind the insulation and plastic on the inside of the rooms on top of the wall insulation. Thank you for any help you can give me.

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Old 02-02-2014, 12:51 PM   #2
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Equal volume. Install as much return as you install supply.

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Old 02-02-2014, 01:24 PM   #3
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Is there a point of overkill with these size rooms? Thanks
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:11 PM   #4
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Providing 1 CFM per sq ft would be over kill.

Wild guess, you need about .6 to .7 CFM per sq ft.
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:18 PM   #5
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Sorry beenthere, I only know basic terms. I have been told I would need 3 supplys and 5 returns for these two rooms, one 480 sq ft and the other 273 sq ft. Does that sound realistic?
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:28 PM   #6
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If the basement isn't getting too cool now. 3-6" supplies may be plenty. Don't put in 5 returns and put your basement into a negative pressure and draws outside air in. or worse, back drafts your furnace flue.

If you put in 3-6" supplies, then 3-6" returns is what you should also put in.

I would put the supplies a way from the joining opening, and put the returns low near the adjoining opening.
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Old 02-02-2014, 03:40 PM   #7
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Actually we are in our coldest winter I can remember. We have an entertainment area down there and it is very pleasant. My concern is once the sheetrock goes up will we notice a big difference in those areas?
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Old 02-02-2014, 06:59 PM   #8
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Sheetrock on walls will tend to make it warmer. Sheetrock on ceiling will tend to make it cooler.

Your getting some heat from the floor of the first floor. once drywalled, you won't get that heat anymore.

I would put in 3 supplies as stated above along with the returns. You can always close them off if not needed later.
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Old 02-05-2014, 03:24 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mholm View Post
...There is a vapor barrier on the concrete behind the insulation and plastic on the inside of the rooms on top of the wall insulation. ...
You may want to read this (and other relevant articles) regarding basement insulation methods, in particular understanding why your current insulation/vapor barriers arrangement may lead to trapped condensation and potential mold issues.

>http://www.greenbuildingadvisor.com/...-basement-wall

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