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Old 11-12-2010, 10:03 AM   #1
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Baseboard piping help


I have a 2 story home with a basement. The boiler is in the basement and I have added a bedroom above the garage. Is it OK to run the baseboard pipe to heat the bedroom thru the attic instead of the garage cieling beloww the new bedroom?

Garage is cold, but will pump handle the head pressure to get up to the attic?

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Old 11-12-2010, 05:09 PM   #2
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Baseboard piping help


What are you going to insulate the pipes with?

Are you going to make your system into a glycol system, so the pipes don't freeze and burst if you have a power outage?

The height of the attic doesn't add any head pressure for the pump to work against. Only the length of the pipe and the fittings do that.

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Old 11-14-2010, 12:46 PM   #3
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Baseboard piping help


I think I am just going to run the pipe up the attic and back down to continue the loop and avoid runni9ng in the garage cieling.
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Old 11-14-2010, 02:25 PM   #4
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Baseboard piping help


Still need freeze protection from the if the pipe is ran in the attic.
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Old 11-14-2010, 10:25 PM   #5
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Baseboard piping help


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Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
The height of the attic doesn't add any head pressure for the pump to work against. Only the length of the pipe and the fittings do that.
Unless I'm misunderstanding you, I think you've got it completely backwards.

Head pressure is directly affected by HEIGHT, not length. In other words, you could run out of a pump in a horizontal direction for 100 feet and not get the head pressure you would by running it vertically for 20. One of the greatest factors in determining head pressure is the affect of gravity against the pump...which means vertical.

So, if you have a pipeline that runs 50 feet horizontal and then elbows up 100 feet, you do NOT figure on head pressure of 150 feet of pipe. You figure it based on only the 100 vertical feet, and then calculate in the pressure added by having the elbow.



Without telling what kind of pump you have, nobody can really say if it can pump up to your attic. If you can find a model number and brand, the manufacturer will likely have a chart that tells you the pressure/flow loss with increased height. Here is an example of what the chart may look like: http://www.marineandreef.com/Articles.asp?ID=124 Of course this is not the type of pump you want, but it is an example of what you should be looking for.

Some are more of a graph type, with x and y coordinates and a line graphed out to show you how flow decreases with head height.
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Old 11-15-2010, 04:21 AM   #6
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Baseboard piping help


The height of the pipe DOES NOT add any head pressure to the work the circulator has to do. We're not talking about a pump on an open system here. We're talking about a circulator on a cloesed loop system. A circulator IS NOT a pump.

100 foot of horizontal pipe, has more resistance to water flow then 20 foot of vertical rise in a closed system served by a circulator.
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Old 11-15-2010, 10:13 AM   #7
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Baseboard piping help


Quote:
Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
The height of the pipe DOES NOT add any head pressure to the work the circulator has to do. We're not talking about a pump on an open system here. We're talking about a circulator on a cloesed loop system. A circulator IS NOT a pump.

100 foot of horizontal pipe, has more resistance to water flow then 20 foot of vertical rise in a closed system served by a circulator.
What is the difference in a pump and a circulator?
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Old 11-15-2010, 03:20 PM   #8
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A pump puts/moves water to where it isn't.

A Circulator can only move water if it is already there(that is why it is NOT a pump). And why a heating pipe/baseboard/radiator can become air bound and not heat. The circulator can not move water through it. Because it is NOT a pump.

Static pressure has nothing to do with circulator head pressure.

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