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Old 01-29-2011, 09:33 AM   #16
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Anyone use a Ridgid 300 Pipe Machine


Where are you located Patti? Maybe someone nearby could help you out.

But with the name Patti Norris, I would think you're a hot Irish chick with red hair near Dublin.

I'll fly over

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Old 01-29-2011, 09:58 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Anti-wingnut View Post
Where are you located Patti? Maybe someone nearby could help you out.

But with the name Patti Norris, I would think you're a hot Irish chick with red hair near Dublin.

I'll fly over
always willing to go the extra step to help I see What a giving guy.

she said she has an 811 die head

Last edited by nap; 01-29-2011 at 10:01 AM.
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Old 01-29-2011, 12:06 PM   #18
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Anyone use a Ridgid 300 Pipe Machine


Ive been using the ridgid 535 and 300 for over 40 years from 1/2 inch to 6 inch , the only problem with the dies is that there broken or worn out,with the 811 what is the ridgid part number of the dies are you using,if you replace the dies make sure they are install in order 1 to 4,the 811 is also make which 1 to 4, electrical dies are straight,and plumbing dies are tapper,one way to set the tread depth is use a factory nipple tread and insert it into the die head and adjust the dies to the tread and lock it down remove the nipple and make a tread on a Peace of pipe and see if that a proper thread,make sure you use plenty of cutting oil when treading.
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Old 01-29-2011, 02:21 PM   #19
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what is the ridgid part number of the dies are you using,if you replace the dies make sure they are install in order 1 to 4,the 811 is also make which 1 to 4, electrical dies are straight,and plumbing dies are tapper,.
no, threading on electrical conduit is not straight. Even by the NEC they must be NPT which is tapered. (3/4"/foot)

as previously posted by anti-wingnut: NEC 344.28
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Old 01-29-2011, 04:15 PM   #20
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Anyone use a Ridgid 300 Pipe Machine


my mistake
Once rigid-steel conduit is cut, it must be threaded for use with threaded couplings, locknuts, and bushings. To thread conduit, use a pipe-cutting die with a standard pipe thread of 3/4-inch taper per foot. This die cuts a deeper thread on the end of the conduit and then tapers the cut at the rear or shoulder of the thread. This is just the opposite of a running thread on a bolt.
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Old 01-31-2011, 08:38 AM   #21
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Hey everyone . . . The dies that I just purchased are:

Ridgid 47765 for 1/2" - 3/4" (High Speed Universal Right Hand)

Ridgid 47770 for 1" - 2" (High Speed Universal Right Hand)

I can provide pics if you would like, if you think it would help.
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Old 01-31-2011, 10:54 AM   #22
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Looks like correct numbers to me.

Did you put the #1 die in the #1 hole and on as such?

Did you download the manual?


The only other thing I can think of is there is something wrong with the head so the size indicator isn't correct. If it cuts threads but they the resulting piece is too large of a diameter, I would try adjusting the "over/under" settings to cutting undersized. You should be able to take one of the store bought nipples and thread that into the dies and then by using the over/under adjustment, snug the dies onto that nipple. Then try cutting one at that setting. I would suspect it will still be a bit oversize due to the stresses imparted when cutting a thread that will tend to open the dies a bit. If so, just use that same over/under adjustment to tighten the cut a bit more. then cut another ppipe. Keep doing that until you get a cut you are happy with.

Then, I would scribe a new line on the Link to indicate what is a proper cut on your machine.

I am guessing there might be some worn parts in the thowout lever and associated release system that simply is not closing the dies in as much as they should be. The adjusting I spoke of is to compensate for that.
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Old 02-01-2011, 11:07 AM   #23
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Thanks for hangin in there with me. I know you are just as interested in solving this as I am. I'm sorry, but I thought I had mentioned that I cut (threaded) my pipe under, over, and cut up to 1" of threads on the pipe, down to only threading the pipe a 1/2". And in experimenting, I made countless combinations in small increments so that I could leave no combination in question. Needless to say, no combination allowed the pipe to screw into a fitting.

I think it can only be two things. 1). The pipe was not made to standard specs. (made in South Africa) No matter how deep the threads are cut, the fitting will never screw onto a slightly "larger" pipe- agree on that concept?

2). I am not sure if this makes such a huge difference, but after cutting the pipe to size (with the "on-board" pipe cutter), my cut is not exactly, perfectly square.

There seems to be a 3/8" - 1/2" section of the circumference of the pipe that sticks out from the rest of the cut. I can see it as its rotating. It looked to me like it was where the pipe was welded. It's only out of the "perfectly square cut" by about 3/32".

Right about now, I'm going to go to Home Depot and buy a piece of their 2" pipe, or ask (one of the guys I know) to thread a piece of the South African pieces I bring in.

Oh, by the way, on the head for 1" - 2" pipe, there is already 2 other notches cut around the 2" factory notch. I think if you would take a look at a few pics, it may become clearer to you that the taper on a Home Depot pipe as compared to my threads is a whole lot different. My threads look flat, while the HD threads look very tapered.

I'll post after my HD test. Thanks again for your help.
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Old 02-01-2011, 11:13 AM   #24
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I'm sorry, I just noticed that I didn't answer your questions. Yes, one by one I replaced the die- and there is only one way they can go in. The directions on the package were very clear. Yes, I read the manual (part of it; can't lie).

Tried the using the store-bought nipples as templates. You should really see a pic to compare a store-bought and my-cut threads (there's a radical taper difference).

I'll be back to ya after the HD experiment.
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Old 02-01-2011, 12:01 PM   #25
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Quote:
I think it can only be two things. 1). The pipe was not made to standard specs. (made in South Africa) No matter how deep the threads are cut, the fitting will never screw onto a slightly "larger" pipe- agree on that concept?
No, I don't. The pipe will end up whatever size you set the dies for. If the pipe is larger in diameter, it just means the dies will cut off more material.


Quote:
2). I am not sure if this makes such a huge difference, but after cutting the pipe to size (with the "on-board" pipe cutter), my cut is not exactly, perfectly square.
??? I suppose it is possible if the die head is not square to the pipe but it still will cut the pipe to the size you set. You can deal with that after you figure out how to get this to cut the right size.

Quote:
I'm sorry, but I thought I had mentioned that I cut (threaded) my pipe under, over, and cut up to 1" of threads on the pipe, down to only threading the pipe a 1/2". And in experimenting, I made countless combinations in small increments so that I could leave no combination in question. Needless to say, no combination allowed the pipe to screw into a fitting.
by over and under I am not speaking to how long the threaded section is. I am speaking to setting the diameter of the dies to cut under or over sized. You need to adjust the setting for the diameter of the cut That is accomplished by loosening the clamp lever on the adjustment portion of the head and moving the size bar to a smaller size. You can actually set the dies so they would be too small for the pipe using just that.

and if you would post or link some pics, I would be glad to look at them.

the taper is determined by the dies. You have dies designed to provide a NPT standard taper.

What you can do is after you cut a thread, set a straight edge on the pipe and hang it over the thread. Then do that with a factory cut pipe. A NPT taper is 3/4"/foot so with a threaded portion of 2" (should be around the proper length of threads) you should have 1/8" of taper. That should be measurable using the method I described. If you have more or less than 2" of thread, you can calculate what the amount of taper measured should be. It is simply 1/16" for each inch of thread length.


you do realize that the proper length of the threaded portion is equivalent to the width of the dies, right? That means as you are cutting the pipe, you cut until the pipe is flush with the end of the die. There is no reason to cut any further as that is as small as the cut will be. If you cut more after that, you will have a flat thread for the distance beyond the end of the dies and then the taper will begin after that. It provides no benefit to do that so don't do that.

If you cut less than that, you will not have cut the pipe to the proper size. It will be larger than intended.

Quote:
Yes, one by one I replaced the die- and there is only one way they can go in. The directions on the package were very clear.
if they were installed wrong though, you would have put them in the same wrong way. Make sure the #1 die is in the #1 receiver, #2 die in the #2 receiver and so on.

Last edited by nap; 02-01-2011 at 12:33 PM.
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Old 02-01-2011, 01:52 PM   #26
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[QUOTE]
Quote:
Originally Posted by nap View Post
No, I don't. The pipe will end up whatever size you set the dies for. If the pipe is larger in diameter, it just means the dies will cut off more material.
What I meant was: that I tried over-cutting and under-cutting when I thread. And I meant I even tried cutting the threads from the right length (to the exact end of the die) down to (in thread increments to only a half inch of threads. AND I tried both over and under cutting the threads again during another thread-by thread decrease in threading length.

I understand what you are saying. I was still remembering when I had the HS SS dies in the head. When I cut deeper, it flattened the peaks of the threads- what an un-holy mess.


Quote:
??? I suppose it is possible if the die head is not square to the pipe but it still will cut the pipe to the size you set. You can deal with that after you figure out how to get this to cut the right size.
and if you would post or link some pics, I would be glad to look at them.
the taper is determined by the dies. You have dies designed to provide a NPT standard taper.
It was just a thought. Consider this: The die begin to cut threads on the pipe at an angle. That would make the threads deeper on one part of the pipe than the rest. I guess if that were to happen, I would notice an eliptacle motion going on while I was threading the pipe. I am going to keep a critical eye on that, next few pipes I cut and thread for the pics.

Just came back from Home Depot. I took a foot-long piece of my South African 2" pipe with me, along with all of my short cut-off failures in a 5 gal. bucket to HD's Plumbing dept. My guy wasn't there, it wasn't busy, so the 3yr. laid-off apprentice listened to my delemma. I asked him if he would just thread one end of the foot-long piece that I brought with me. He reamed it and threaded it. Dammit, it screwed into a 2" union really nice. Well, now I know for sure it's not out-of-spec pipe.

It might just be my mind doing some wishful thinking, but I took a close look at his dies and to me it appears they have more of a taper at the very end than mine. In other words, the die I examined had more of an upward slant toward the machine than mine. I don't know, but I look at mine and they just look flat. I will reference pics. I am not sure If I can post pics in a thread, or if I need to ref to another location, but I'll figure it out.

Quote:
What you can do is after you cut a thread, set a straight edge on the pipe and hang it over the thread. Then do that with a factory cut pipe. A NPT taper is 3/4"/foot so with a threaded portion of 2" (should be around the proper length of threads) you should have 1/8" of taper. That should be measurable using the method I described. If you have more or less than 2" of thread, you can calculate what the amount of taper measured should be. It is simply 1/16" for each inch of thread length.
I'll include your above description in photos.

Quote:
if they were installed wrong though, you would have put them in the same wrong way. Make sure the #1 die is in the #1 receiver, #2 die in the #2 receiver and so on.
I didn't trust anyone before me and put the right numbered die in the same numbered slot. Thanks, you are really covering everything.
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Old 02-01-2011, 02:27 PM   #27
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[QUOTE=Patti Norris;582531]
Quote:

What I meant was: that I tried over-cutting and under-cutting when I thread. And I meant I even tried cutting the threads from the right length (to the exact end of the die) down to (in thread increments to only a half inch of threads. AND I tried both over and under cutting the threads again during another thread-by thread decrease in threading length.
.
the length should always be cut the same. Regardless what else you do, always cut the threads until the pipe reaches the end of the dies. If you do anything differently, you will have an improper thread. As I said, if you cut longer, you make a straight part of threaded pipe that serves no purpose. If you do not cut enough, you have not make the pipe as small as it should be and you will end up not being able to put it in a coupling.

so, do NOT cut anything other than a proper length of thread. Altering the length of the cut will do nothing to solve your problem because that has nothing to do with the problem.


So, the only changes to the threads are to be made by the adjustment on the head as I described.

What I would do is: take one of the pipes that are cut correctly. Thread it into the dies (obviously, I hope anyway) from the back side of the head so it is if you had cut it. Make sure it is flush with the end of the dies. Then, loosen the clamp lever (see the previously linked manuals to identify the lever) and adjust the dies to be snug on the threads of the pipe. Be sure the throwout lever is in the closed position when you do this or all is for naught.

Note the alignment of the 2" indication on the size bar. It should line up, or be quite close to the mark indicating a proper setting for 2" pipe.

If anything other than correct, it should read to the open side as it is difficult to get the dies to be as snug doing this as if you had actually cut the threads. You may have to make the setting a bit more to the under direction to compensate for that but that would be determined by cutting a set of threads.

also, yes, you can upload pictures to this site or host them elsewhere and post a link.

Last edited by nap; 02-01-2011 at 07:51 PM.
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Old 02-02-2011, 01:34 PM   #28
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Is it possible that the axis of the pipe jaws is very much out of parallel to the tool holder?
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Old 02-02-2011, 03:24 PM   #29
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Is it possible that the axis of the pipe jaws is very much out of parallel to the tool holder?
Yes. As a matter of fact, one of the (collars, rings?) holding the (body assy.?) in place was loose. It was the farthest (support bar?) from the operators side. I looked at it and the (collar, ring?) was about an inch and 3 qtrs away from the (body assy., transmission housing?)

As far as your quote regarding the axis goes, I suppose there's more to proper alignment than slamming the ring all the way down the support bar, so that it sandwiches the (body assy., transmission housing) tightly, then tightening the allen screw. (and backing out the screw first too)

It seems like the allen screw hole is slightly stripped, or the size is some foreign mm hex head hole that I don't have the correct tool for. But I managed to get both of them PDT. (pretty dam tight)

I took videos of the cut (from the pipe cutter) as it rotated when the machine was running. There is definately a bulge sticking out at the weld about a qtr of an inch; it takes up about 1-1/8" of the circumference of the 2" pipe.

I am working on another project right now (hanging drywall), but will certainly be in touch. By the way- had to give my pipe job to someone else (they held out as long as they could).

I can get more jobs, but I want to get this machine to work right. The videos that I took were with my cellphone in the .3G2 format. It is difficult to find a player for that type of a file, so I'll do something with my FugiFilm- I think that'll give me an .mp4 file. I really want you to see this. And geeze; a Brand New cutting wheel too.

Have suggestions for an alignment?

. . . Didn't you say that you rebuild these machines in the past? Ya know- everything about this machine seems loose and sloppy to me. The cutter has too much side-to-side play in it; each one of the die have approx. 3/16 play- in-and-out; and the rear centering head loosens itself sometimes. (but I'll take the blame for that "sometimes")

And another thing, it seems odd to me that when I move the switch to forward, the motor runs counter-clockwise. I have to have the switch in the REVERSE position for the pipe to run clockwise. Am I stupid; or is that the way it's supposed to be?

I don't have time to pull the wiring out to see if it's wired right- only just for now, I'll just switch it to reverse when I cut and thread- just thought you might know if this phenomina is bizzare, or if it's meant to be like that. To me, it is backwards.

While I'm on the subject, the rear centering head and the hand wheel on the other end have an eighth inch of play front to back, (or side to side if standing on the operators position).

I am kinda getting off the main topic here, which is "threading", but I thought you might like to know what other oddities I have found with this machine. Earlier, I told you that the cutter tool was sloppy. I just checked it out again and took a measurement to give you an idea of "how sloppy" the cutter is.

If I grab the adjusting handle, and say I held it at 3 o'clock, it can be moved to the right one inch, before the support arm stops it. Does that seem like the pin is worn down, or the support arm has been spread apart too far- maybe from someone throwing it in the back of a truck for many years? I suppose it really doesn't matter, as long as the roller on the cutter is flat and perpendicular to the cutter. You agree?

I get long-winded most of the time, when I write. I apologize.

P.S. I guess it wouldn't hurt to shoot some grease through those fittings. Thanks again.

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