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Old 02-06-2011, 02:14 AM   #16
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Advice on furnace humidifier


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Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
Only time I get that complaint, is when I install one on an existing furnace that someone oversized.

Otherwise, the blower seldom has to run for a humidity call only after the outdoor temp drops below 35.

Connected to the hot water line. The amount of time that the blower is on for just a humidity call is relatively short.

A standard PSC blower running 24/7 for a month won't raise the electric bill half as much as a Truesteam will. So the little extra for humidifying with hot water should only be about 1/4 of what a Truesteam would raise the electric bill.
Been, most furnaces are over sized or the HO runs the heat between 65 and 68*F and that sure is not long enough to humidify air.
I also have to disagree about the cost of running the blower full time: You are drawing 3 to 5 off the blower.

Typically a 25 cu ft side by side will run at 3.5 to 3.95--so say 4 amps and the are a run cap compressor.

So in plain language your furnace blower cost more to run on constant speed as a big refrigerator-freezer

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Old 02-06-2011, 04:01 AM   #17
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Yeah but its not a "steam humidifier" though. I've installed a handful of of the aprilaires but like the truesteam much better. It seems like the aprilaire wastes a ton of water
That ton of water is a lot cheaper then the ton of electric the Truesteam uses.
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Old 02-06-2011, 12:19 PM   #18
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Advice on furnace humidifier


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That ton of water is a lot cheaper then the ton of electric the Truesteam uses.
depends on local water utilitys ....our rates here are high.. a steam humidifier
could very well satisfy the humidistat more quickly than a conventional by-pass humid. In such a case the electric consumption would cost less than then the water.

By-pass humidifier are not at all forgiving in the way they must be installed.

The airflow must be at a minimum air velocity measured in FPM a certain Static Preeure.

This makes the installation of by-pass humidifiers problematic. It also means water down the drain as the humidifier supply water won't be absorbed into the air and all the water is going down the drain as waste. That's money down the drain too.
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:25 PM   #19
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Quote: "The airflow must be at a minimum air velocity measured in FPM a certain Static Pressure" Where did you read that or get that info from? I have never heard of it or seen it it any manuals

This makes the installation of by-pass humidifiers problematic. It also means water down the drain as the humidifier supply water won't be absorbed into the air and all the water is going down the drain as waste. That's money down the drain too.[/quote]
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Old 02-06-2011, 01:53 PM   #20
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Factory seminars by Auto Flo, RSES speakers, RSES SAM Manuals.

Does not surprise me that you have not heard of it. Something that seems so simple as a humidifier seems so cut and dried and it should not require any real scientific or specialized technical knowledge to instill one.

Problematic means that there is no good place to tap the supply air for the bypass because it will cause the air to turbulate and go no where.

You would not cut a bypass opening on the front or rear of the plenum where the ac coil is would you? You'd have a dead air space if you did.

You would not consider cutting a by pass opening in the bottom of the transition from the plenum to the trunk would you? No, you would not because the volume at that point is so high it would blow water off the humidifier media pad. You would also affect the air volume in the trunk and could cause less air flow to the registers: Turbulation.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:11 PM   #21
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Ah, the theorists. Wonder how Joe average tech is going to measure FPM and static pressure in a humidifier. Surprisingly enough I have a very wealthy customer with expensive furniture and grand pianos who meticulously maintains his drum humidifier and gets better results than with a flo thru. Larger surface area with a wet CLEAN sponge and it works well. Besides the fact that is all we had for the last 25 yrs until 5 yrs ago when flo thrus became popular.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:28 PM   #22
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Ah, the theorists. Wonder how Joe average tech is going to measure FPM and static pressure in a humidifier. Surprisingly enough I have a very wealthy customer with expensive furniture and grand pianos who meticulously maintains his drum humidifier and gets better results than with a flo thru. Larger surface area with a wet CLEAN sponge and it works well. Besides the fact that is all we had for the last 25 yrs until 5 yrs ago when flo thrus became popular.


I fully agreed that Rolling Drum type is more efficient, more economic, environmental friendly, than the Flow-Through type. I extremely regret that I trust on the installer to replace my Drum type with this garbage Honeywell Flow-Through humidifier. Now I need a portable humidifier for my piano, and one in my bedroom; then I have to dump 18 gallon of clean and valuable water in to the drain everyday.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:35 PM   #23
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The only problem with the drum type is less than 1% of the population keeps them clean. They get bacteria and slime in them and that is how Legionnaires disease got started. The ones that are available now are so cheap and flimsy that they don't last very long. Now an old tech like Clover and I remember the Autoflo's (97 I believe) of days gone by that were built like a tank.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:37 PM   #24
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Ah, the theorists. Wonder how Joe average tech is going to measure FPM and static pressure in a humidifier. Surprisingly enough I have a very wealthy customer with expensive furniture and grand pianos who meticulously maintains his drum humidifier and gets better results than with a flo thru. Larger surface area with a wet CLEAN sponge and it works well. Besides the fact that is all we had for the last 25 yrs until 5 yrs ago when flo thrus became popular.
Five years?

Dude, I have been using them for twenty years and so has every body around here.

There was a NEWS paper article here that compared the flow thru the drum type.

The flow thru was more healthy to use than the drum type.

The reason was simple: Drum types need more attention and maintenance than flow thru.

They found dangerous levels of staph and staph germs in the drum humidifier whose water sat over the summer.

Then I believe that it was RSES that published an article that revealed a field investigation of drum humidifiers that proved positive for legionallia disease.

I don't know anybody who uses drum humidifiers to day.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:38 PM   #25
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The only problem with the drum type is less than 1% of the population keeps them clean. They get bacteria and slime in them and that is how Legionnaires disease got started. The ones that are available now are so cheap and flimsy that they don't last very long. Now an old tech like Clover and I remember the Autoflo's (97 I believe) of days gone by that were built like a tank.
Daamn I type slow. You had this posted before I was half done with my post.
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Old 02-06-2011, 02:41 PM   #26
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Actually I went out of this biz for 10 yrs and did operations work in large commercial buildings and a hospital complex so the flo thrus must have been popular sooner than I remember. Plus everything has to get to where I am by dog sled so we may be a bit behind the times.
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:00 PM   #27
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The only problem with the drum type is less than 1% of the population keeps them clean. They get bacteria and slime in them and that is how Legionnaires disease got started. The ones that are available now are so cheap and flimsy that they don't last very long. Now an old tech like Clover and I remember the Autoflo's (97 I believe) of days gone by that were built like a tank.



The 97 and the 200P.

I hated those things. They came with plastic water tubes. I leaned real quick that plastic tubing and a hot supply duct don't last.

The 200P taught me humidifiers are better installed on the CAR.

Daamn floats always needed adjusted and over flowed.

i still have an old Lobb in the basement still in the box from 1990 and a few 800 BPs from Auto Flo too,



WA 2 Lobb
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:02 PM   #28
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Actually I went out of this biz for 10 yrs and did operations work in large commercial buildings and a hospital complex so the flo thrus must have been popular sooner than I remember. Plus everything has to get to where I am by dog sled so we may be a bit behind the times.

Is true that it's so cold where you are even the women have beards?
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:07 PM   #29
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Naw, it's a cultural thing, Olga could lay a good lickin on you.
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Old 02-06-2011, 03:22 PM   #30
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[quote=yuri;585837]Ah, the theorists. Wonder how Joe average tech is going to measure FPM and static pressure in a humidifier.

Well, I never had to carry an anemometer air flow tester when i installed humidifiers. I just used common sense and made sure I stayed in the mfg requirements.

I have to admit, however, that even then not all humidifier jobs are successful.

If the furnace is too big or the or the stat is set too low than even a good install won't humidify the home.

One customer had a new grand piano that cost like a ba zillion dollars(lol) and the humidity had to be kept at 40% year round. Right away the first question out of my mouth was " How warm do you keep your home". She told me between 70* and 74*f. Great any humidifier.

i went back when she complained the humidity was only 35%RH. Looked at the stat--67*F.

I think you get it. She did not want to pay the high gas bill her new grand needed to sustain 40%RH.

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