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Old 11-08-2011, 12:34 PM   #1
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


I am going to run a duct from the main trunk about 8 feet to a newly finished area of the basement. What size duct would you suggest? I am going to use a round diffusor on the ceiling.


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Old 11-08-2011, 03:22 PM   #2
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


What size of duct is already installed on the system, and how many ducts are there. Also, is there a cold air return in the basement already?

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Old 11-08-2011, 04:15 PM   #3
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


6 in diameter round pipe is the most common in new construction.
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:29 PM   #4
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


pictures would help ....I would make sure you have a return air for the finished area as well ...6" pipe is common what size are you talking you may need 2 runs or more ......size of main trunk how many runs off it you see were Iam comming from..pictures would help.....
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:38 PM   #5
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


Six inch is the most common as HR mentioned. No way to know with the limited info given how many of those 6" runs you'll need though. Usually there's one over any exterior door and one over any window, along with a return. An 8" supply carries roughly the same amount of air as two 6" runs if you only have room for one.
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Old 11-08-2011, 06:40 PM   #6
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


Typically, round diffusers are not the best choice for basements with a higher heating load than a cooling load.............
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Old 11-09-2011, 01:52 PM   #7
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


I put a link to a video at the end if the post, hope it helps.

There are 14 existing ducts. The room is in the basement and is about 11'x15'. There are three registers along the trunk.

I do not anticipate needing all three of these trunk registers open. during the summer all are closed and in the winter it is usually closed as well. i am insulating and drywalling so temp should be easier to maintain. I believe that the new area will only need a register open during the summer to keep it cool because i will have computer and electronics that warmed the old room they were in by about 5 degrees. I would prefer to keep it on the cold side and thought i should try to plan ahead before drywalling the ceiling.

There is no cold air return in the basement. I was considering adding an open vent to the utility room since this is getting closed off from the rest of the basement just to let air through. I also wondered if i could/should put a vent in one of the cold air returns coming from the upstairs that would be in the ceiling of the new area. I don't know if that could have a negative impact. I know messing with the system involves calculations of air flow and a lot of stuff over my head but man i just want to add one vent on an area that has three that are not being used.

I thought a round diffusor would help distribute the air in this space better than a square one but i could go the other way if it were preferred.

http://i1181.photobucket.com/albums/...d/1db12918.mp4
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Old 11-09-2011, 03:16 PM   #8
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


You have to make sure you have combustion air for that utility room!

Do you have a direct vent furnace?
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:02 PM   #9
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


Quote:
Originally Posted by Technow
You have to make sure you have combustion air for that utility room!

Do you have a direct vent furnace?
That is why i thought adding a vent on the wall that would let air flow through the eall from the main part of the basement into the utility room or maybe replacing the existing door with a louvered one would be a good idea.

Direct vent...is that where it draws air from outside like a high efficiency furnace? I don't think so, i don't have a high efficiency unit.
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:19 PM   #10
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


toobhed, adding a vent is not what provides combustion air. HVAC systems are what are classified as a closed system. Unless you add a fresh air makeup into the system, all it does is recycle the air that is already in the home. Also adding a louver in the door, does not make for not having a duct from the outside for make-up air.

You close the space off downstairs to segment the mechanical's from the rest of the home, you are going to have to add a fresh air vent into the space.
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Old 11-09-2011, 06:03 PM   #11
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


Thanks everyone for the education, i always learn so much from these forums. Forgive me if my questions seem ignorant because, well i am ignorant which is why I'm here

Quote:
You close the space off downstairs to segment the mechanical's from the rest of the home, you are going to have to add a fresh air vent into the space.
so adding a way for air to flow into the utility room from the area that is closed off, by way of a hole in the wall covered with a grill (which i have been calling a vent) Isn't sufficient? How does air get into the system when the space is open? Is there an intake on the furnace that is drawing air in?

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Old 11-09-2011, 06:48 PM   #12
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Adding an additional vent to new finished basement


It draws air from the overall house, and with all of the leaks that most homes have, there is enough for it to get make-up air. Once you start sealing those leaks, or enclose the furnace & water heater into their own space, then you need to supply make-up air. A lot of times, a duct is placed, with a J at the bottom, so that cold air does not spill into the space. A fresh air intake piped into the return is another way. Other times, they just swap the equipment out for direct vent, with fresh air intakes, so that you can keep the home sealed.

The only way to tell how tight your home is, and how much make-up air you need, is by having a blower door test done.

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