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-   -   Adding 2nd zone hot water baseboard.... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/adding-2nd-zone-hot-water-baseboard-168379/)

noodle9400 01-06-2013 11:58 AM

Adding 2nd zone hot water baseboard....
 
I'm looking to add a 2nd zone of hot water baseboard to the addition side of my house. I can't remember but total house size is 17xx sq ft, i think? Regardless more than half but less than 3/4 of it has hot water baseboard. 2 years ago I had a high efficient gas boiler installed. At that time I got a quote for 2200 for the extension of the heat and was told that they had to zone it out. Reason was due to the distance the water would travel through the pipes, the pipes would get as hot as they should.

I started buying baseboards at Lowe's to prepare for a DIY installation, hence why i'm on here. However, with some research in prices online from some companies, I noticed that there are BTU differences. How can baseboards provide different BTUs when its just a copper pipe with fins on it?

Also, how difficult would it be for a DIY kind of person to perform this job? I was gonna have a buddy of mine help me out. Neither of us are plumbers/hvac people. The boiler I have is a Bryant BW9. Just looking to save money and gain actual heat on that side of the house. Its got as low as 42 degrees with no heat and lately my wife and I have been sleeping in the already heated spare bedroom. Any advice, suggestions, information, would greatly be helpful. Especially in the purchasing of baseboard area.

beenthere 01-06-2013 01:52 PM

Different thickness of the copper tube, and thickness and number per inch of the aluminum fins.

Its not hard to install.

techpappy 01-06-2013 02:41 PM

If you require a separate zone just install separate supply and return piping all the way from the boiler and install a separate pump and zone valve which are energized when TT calls for heat. OR you could take a chance and just install the piping to the addition off the main circulating pump header. Might be a little cooler....won't know until you try it...you may also have to install zone control valve for existing in order to optimize zoning..also may have to install zone controller to provide prioritization of zones. May depend on size of boiler. Maybe you can work with your pro ..get instructions..do the grunt work and get them to set up controls etc.

noodle9400 01-10-2013 09:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beenthere (Post 1087637)
Different thickness of the copper tube, and thickness and number per inch of the aluminum fins.

Its not hard to install.

Gotcha. Ok that makes sense. When you say the thickness of the tube, you're not talking about 3/4" or 1", you're actually referring to the thickness of tube's wall, right? Someone at lowe's mention that to me trying to explain the difference between the L type and M type copper piping. (i think they are the types).

noodle9400 01-10-2013 09:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by techpappy (Post 1087671)
If you require a separate zone just install separate supply and return piping all the way from the boiler and install a separate pump and zone valve which are energized when TT calls for heat. OR you could take a chance and just install the piping to the addition off the main circulating pump header. Might be a little cooler....won't know until you try it...you may also have to install zone control valve for existing in order to optimize zoning..also may have to install zone controller to provide prioritization of zones. May depend on size of boiler. Maybe you can work with your pro ..get instructions..do the grunt work and get them to set up controls etc.

Its not so much required as it is strongly urged. The thermostat is located at 1/4 of of the house. so that area may get warmer faster than the farthest side of the house. With that being said that farther side may not get as warm. Which right now its pretty freaking cold without heat. I literally keep the door closed to that side so the heat stays on the one side of the house. Talking 45-48 degrees in there. Initially installing this seamed easy until you mentioned things like i may need to install a separate pump and zone valve or i may have to install zone controller to provide prioritization of zones. See these things i dont know anything about. Installing everything and get having someone do the hookups at the boiler may be my best option. I'd hate to F up my boiler. Its a Bryant BW9 and its only 2 years old lol.

747 01-10-2013 09:48 PM

You want a plumber/hvac guy. Where i live we have plumbers who also do furnaces. These are the guys who are experts on hotwater heat and some of the old Victorian homes in my town still have the steam furnaces.

noodle9400 01-28-2013 10:17 PM

So I got a couple of quotes so far. 6800 being the highest and 2700 being the lowest. Both with them doing everything. I decided that with these next few quotes I'm gonna get this week, that I am gonna ask how much would it be if they just do the hookup at the boiler. I will do the grunt work of running the supply/return line and connecting the baseboards. But instead of using copper piping I was thinking of using PEX tubing. Cheaper and just as reliable from what I read but I wanted everyones opinions. My nephews grandparent works for south jersey gas and I was quickly talking to him about it. He said to be careful of tube expansion. Any thoughts or concerns??

beenthere 01-29-2013 04:29 AM

Just don't under size the pex.

techpappy 01-29-2013 10:07 AM

Installing and particularly, crimping the PEX connections can be very difficult.

Try and get some instruction and practice before you commit to doing one way or the other. If you are proficient in soldering then running copper may still be the best option for you.
I know I'm an expert at crimping.:laughing::whistling2:NOT!!


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