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Old 03-25-2013, 08:55 AM   #1
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So, I'm in New Brunswick (on the east coast of Canada) and have been a homeowner for almost a month now. It's a new home in a new subdivision and although the final filling and grading of our lot hasn't been done yet, I've been thinking of what I need to learn.

Since I am a complete newb and have no experience landscaping (other than cutting grass) I would like some tips on what I need to do from scratch.

This is also my first post...

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Old 03-25-2013, 09:03 AM   #2
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This site has all the info you could ever need.
http://www.scotts.com/smg/home/home4...rm=BING_scotts

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Old 03-25-2013, 10:44 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by ikethearmyguy View Post
So, I'm in New Brunswick (on the east coast of Canada) and have been a homeowner for almost a month now. It's a new home in a new subdivision and although the final filling and grading of our lot hasn't been done yet, I've been thinking of what I need to learn.

Since I am a complete newb and have no experience landscaping (other than cutting grass) I would like some tips on what I need to do from scratch.

This is also my first post...
Ayuh,.... 2 rules of landscapin' are,....

#1, Pitch the grades away from the house...

#2, Water flows Downhill...
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Old 03-25-2013, 11:52 AM   #4
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Well the developer we bought the land from will be grading the "final product" so water will drain away from the house (that much I did know lol). I guess what I need to know is what to do once he says "you can start seeding now". I wasn't joking when I said I have no idea lol
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Old 03-25-2013, 06:38 PM   #5
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Sounds like you need a wife, she would take care of that "telling you what to do" job............
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Old 03-25-2013, 06:54 PM   #6
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Well the developer we bought the land from will be grading the "final product" so water will drain away from the house (that much I did know lol). I guess what I need to know is what to do once he says "you can start seeding now". I wasn't joking when I said I have no idea lol
Since its a new subdivision, more than likely the builder will be back when its a little warmer to lay sod. Thats usually the case anyway.
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:51 AM   #7
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Since its a new subdivision, more than likely the builder will be back when its a little warmer to lay sod. Thats usually the case anyway.
I'd asked about that and no sod, no seeding just dirt. I take it sodding is more expensive than seeding but easier?
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:55 AM   #8
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Instant lawn. But more expensive
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:12 AM   #9
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That's what I figured. How soon is too soon to start seeding then? I know it varies with location but what's a general rule of thumb?
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:22 AM   #10
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The soil temp. needs to be 60 or 65f for seed germination
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:21 AM   #11
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Okay that's about 16-19C but (dumb question coming) how can I tell the temp of the ground?
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Old 03-29-2013, 09:02 AM   #12
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Hydroseeding turf will give you a much stronger lawn then sod to start. Even for small lots it makes practical sense. Want to know the technology sod farms use to grow sod? Come on guess? Sod is but a transplant product. It starts dying the minute harvested so if you must sod your lawn, get it within 24 hours of being cut and do not let it sit on the truck rolled up.

At the end of the day though, with any turf, you will be planting the highest maintenance and resource demanding plant material you could ever dream up.

I am a former turfgrass manager and landscape designer. I always tried to encourage homeowners to think carefully about how much lawn they really needed and were committed to taking care of. I tried to talk them into nicely textured and colorful (if the wanted) groundcovers instead.

Hate to break the news to you but your developer and builder probably raped your native land. They came in with giant scrapers and moved the fertile topsoil once in place to create drainage problems for the development or they hauled it off in dump trucks. You may have to pay to bring the same or similar topsoil back.

You need to invest in a soil test to see what is left and how you can turn it over and ammend it. Soil tests are surprisingly cheap and will save you so much money in the long run. A good soil lab will tell you how to collect and prepare the samples. They will tell you exactly what you need to do to fix what has happened.

Meanwhile, why not scale your new yard to paper? Then you can play with where you should put things before you have to dig holes and plant them---in the case of shrubs and trees. And do remember to plant for the mature height and breadth of plants. Too many people and even pro landscapers plant to close to the house because it looks better at first. Piper gets paid when the trees and shrubs mature.


Last edited by user1007; 03-29-2013 at 09:05 AM.
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