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Old 09-03-2012, 09:06 AM   #1
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My two-year old tree seems to grow asymmetrically (towards West).
Please see the attached photos.
Is it ok or need correction?
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Tree-005.jpg   Tree-009.jpg  

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Old 09-03-2012, 09:39 AM   #2
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It will need a trim to balance out those branches, but I wouldn't do it now. I don't know where you live so it is hard to give more specific advice.

At this stage you don't want to take off too much foliage as that is the tree's energy source. I would keep it staked up and watch it for a couple more seasons. It may put some growth out on the other side and balance itself.

You should give it a pruning after it's first few years anyway, that's when you can shape the tree somewhat. If you get cold where you live then wait to prune until the leaves fall (late winter/early spring). This helps the wound heal and avoids insect infestation.

Please research how to prune this tree properly, or let a professional do it if you are unsure. It seems like an easy enough thing, just cutting some branches, but if you do it improperly it can stress the tree and affect its full-grown shape.

You should put your location in your profile - that helps people help you.

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Old 09-03-2012, 09:41 AM   #3
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The other thing I notice is that your tree is very close to the fence and other trees. What kind of tree is this? Do you know how big it will get when adult? It may very well go over the fence and interfere with other trees in that location.
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Old 09-03-2012, 09:44 AM   #4
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What he ^ said.

Pear tree?
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Old 09-03-2012, 11:09 AM   #5
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Trim the branches to the shape you want and let it grow. Most trunks straighten out by the time the tree is 5-6 years old, unless it is a species that typically has an irregular trunk like Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo).
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Old 09-03-2012, 03:34 PM   #6
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I agree that it is probably too close the fence. You must plant trees for what they will grow into! And you need to be able to get around them to prune. I would move it while you can.

I totally disagree about letting it grow without a trim. The first thing I did when I planted a tree was prune it or had someone else do so. And I planted, or had planted, thousands. Why people are so afraid to prune amazes me. The trees cannot do it themselves you know?!

Pruning does several things. First of all you can resolve things like crossing branches on small trees with hand pruners that will grow to be major chainsaw problems. Second, pruning top growth stimulates root growth and reduces the trees need to commit fluid and nutrient resources to too much aspirating leaf growth. Finally, it lets you shape it into what you want and reduces the "sail" surface that has to respond to the wind load on it. That's part of your problem now.

It is controversial where I am but in N California where I practiced, young trees got at least one sturdy full height tree stake to get them a start. Sometimes they got two placed on the windward and leeward side. Or even wooden guy wires anchored to wooden spikes for larger caliper trees to hold it from 3-4 directions.

Buy adjustable tree ties or get the simple ones cut from old tires with wire on the end. Make a figure eight between the tree and stake. Replace or adjust often.

As for when to prune next? I would wait for the leaves to drop. If you live in a warm winter climate, you can fall prune. If winters are harsh and/or early I would wait until spring to see what cold damage has been suffered. If you wait until spring it is sometimes easier to see the buds so you know what to prune back to.

And please don't make your trees scream or hurt yourself. Nothing stings like a dull pruning saw! Use nice SHARP pruners and saws! Dip them in bleach between cuts if you suspect any kind of fungus.

Every tree owner should get a good book on pruning. Morrow used to publish a little one that was almost as good as any for general guidance I ever ran across. It is out of print and $30/used seems a bit much but it is called "How to Prune Almost Anything". Ask your REAL, not box store, nursery for recs too. Or visit the library and copy pages for trees that you have.

http://www.amazon.com/Prune-Almost-E...ost+everything

Where are you by the way? You might want to update your displayed profile with ss number, exact home address, bank account and routing number, passport number and birthdate. Or I guess knowing where you are regionally or city and state would be as helpful to us on this forum in answering yard care questions.

Last edited by user1007; 09-03-2012 at 03:46 PM.
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Old 09-03-2012, 07:20 PM   #7
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Just a note on tree staking ..... there are just as many arguments against tree staking as there are in support of it, according to my wife who is a landscape architect. Tree staking can harm the growth of a tree by not allowing it to do what it would do naturally. Here is one article against tree staking that I googled. http://forestry.about.com/od/treeand...ee_staking.htm

The point is that I would rely more on pruning the tree then allowing it to grow naturally than I would on staking it to ensure a straight trunk.

Kevin
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Old 09-03-2012, 09:04 PM   #8
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Some of my tree bark is damaged.
See the attached photo.
Is it serious?
How to heal it?
Attached Thumbnails
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:10 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by albertkao View Post
Some of my tree bark is damaged.
See the attached photo.
Is it serious?
How to heal it?
It looks like it is trying to heal itself. Make sure it is not harboring disease or insects. You could apply some tree tar to it but the jury is out among arborists whether this is a could thing or bad thing. You can manage to seal in problems and create a worse situation.
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Old 09-05-2012, 03:53 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
It looks like it is trying to heal itself. Make sure it is not harboring disease or insects. You could apply some tree tar to it but the jury is out among arborists whether this is a could thing or bad thing. You can manage to seal in problems and create a worse situation.

When I was still in the business ,the Bartlett Tree lab said tree paint and or tar actually retarded the healing process and made us stop using it. This was back in the 70's.
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Old 09-05-2012, 07:00 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisn View Post
When I was still in the business ,the Bartlett Tree lab said tree paint and or tar actually retarded the healing process and made us stop using it. This was back in the 70's.
That sounds about right. I used to seal every cut when pruning trees trees and then came word to stop the practice.

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