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-   -   Too late to Aerate and dethatch??? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/too-late-aerate-dethatch-106749/)

Yeti 06-05-2011 11:18 PM

Too late to Aerate and dethatch???
 
I'm located in Northern IL, just wondering if it's too late in the season to core aerate and dethatch? Read a couple different places that it could be bad for your lawn if you do this when it's too hot out. Temps this next weekend are supposed to be in the upper 70's to mid 80's.

downunder 06-06-2011 04:18 PM

Yeti
Do you have irrigation?
I work for a city parks department. We aerated our ball fields last week. Ga 90's. But we have to work around different sports seasons and get it when we can. And we can run all the water we want to.:thumbup:

bob22 06-06-2011 07:42 PM

Go to:
http://cropsoil.psu.edu/turf/extension/home-lawns
Various sections on each of the subjects you raised and others with good detail and are fact-based.

Thatching brief from site:
Don't remove thatch when turf is weak or under heat or drought stress. Doing so increases the chance of injury and decreases recovery potential. Remove thatch from cool-season turfgrass stands during late summer/early fall. Temperatures are usually cooler at this time, reducing the chances of serious turf injury. You can perform late summer/early fall thatch removal in conjunction with renovation practices such as aeration, fertilization, and overseeding. Also, weed encroachment is not as likely to occur with late summer/fall thatch removal as it is with spring removal.

user1007 06-06-2011 07:57 PM

You can certainly still aerate now. I wouldn't fret about dethatching too much either if you can keep the turf moist in a pinch until we get some real rain. And they do sell enzymatic dethatching agents. They are a little pricey though.

Breakthecycle2 06-07-2011 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 662322)
You can certainly still aerate now. I wouldn't fret about dethatching too much either if you can keep the turf moist in a pinch until we get some real rain. And they do sell enzymatic dethatching agents. They are a little pricey though.

Im getting some brown spots now. I overseeded and dethatched in early spring. What benefits would I see from aerating now?

user1007 06-07-2011 09:22 PM

Aeration improves circulation around roots and allows deeper water penetration into the removed cores. Ordinarily you do it around feeding time but it generally will not hurt the turf but for the appearance of it looking like 1,000 rabbits left pellets on top of your lawn. Of course if the soil has been dried out by drought the aerator will just bounce along the surface and never penetrate to pull out the cores as desired.

De-thatching is more aggressive as the tools need to beat up the grass blades more than a little to get at and yank out the thatch. I would not recommend it at this time unless you have more than adequate irrigation to compensate.

As for your brown spots? Make sure you mow your turf tall to help a bit with that. You can buy a hose end aerator that may help. It has two water jets on either side of a plate you put your foot on.

Brown spots, if all else is healthy and the appear for no particular reason could be insects (e.g. grubs) or a fungal growth. Water early in the day to help prevent the latter. Apply an insectiside to kill the grubs.

You know, depending on where you are, stop by and talk with the parks and rec or even golf course turf managers about such questions. Was one once and was always flattered people would stop by to ask questions now and then. If your state has any money left for things like ag extension? Call those folks also. California used to have a nice group dedicated just to turfgrasses and related consumer questions. I suspect gone now with the budget crisis but the publications might still exist. Turf has not been an issue for me in the decades I have lived, on and off, in Chicago. I did ask for a riding lawnmower to navigate the streets of Manhattan but nobody ever gave me one for birthday or Christmas.

Breakthecycle2 06-07-2011 09:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 662998)
Aeration improves circulation around roots and allows deeper water penetration into the removed cores. Ordinarily you do it around feeding time but it generally will not hurt the turf but for the appearance of it looking like 1,000 rabbits left pellets on top of your lawn. Of course if the soil has been dried out by drought the aerator will just bounce along the surface and never penetrate to pull out the cores as desired.

De-thatching is more aggressive as the tools need to beat up the grass blades more than a little to get at and yank out the thatch. I would not recommend it at this time unless you have more than adequate irrigation to compensate.

As for your brown spots? Make sure you mow your turf tall to help a bit with that. You can buy a hose end aerator that may help. It has two water jets on either side of a plate you put your foot on.

Brown spots, if all else is healthy and the appear for no particular reason could be insects (e.g. grubs) or a fungal growth. Water early in the day to help prevent the latter. Apply an insectiside to kill the grubs.

You know, depending on where you are, stop by and talk with the parks and rec or even golf course turf managers about such questions. Was one once and was always flattered people would stop by to ask questions now and then. If your state has any money left for things like ag extension? Call those folks also. California used to have a nice group dedicated just to turfgrasses and related consumer questions. I suspect gone now with the budget crisis but the publications might still exist. Turf has not been an issue for me in the decades I have lived, on and off, in Chicago. I did ask for a riding lawnmower to navigate the streets of Manhattan but nobody ever gave me one for birthday or Christmas.

Thanks for all the info. I was thinking Fungus perhaps, im not really sure. I have been mowing it tall since April, so I know thats not the issue. i cant go any taller, its at the max. I just fertilized last week with week killer, so I think that could have something to do with it, but not too sure. I have been (for the most part watering in the afternoon for a few hours, each (front and back). I notice the brown spots after I mow. at first I thought it was decaying grass clippings, but its not.

user1007 06-07-2011 09:51 PM

If you are using hose end sprinklers, invest in a couple of timers you can pick up for $20 and try watering just before day break.

These brown spots sound like you may have caused a chemical burn in applying your weed and feed product---especially since they appeared immediately after. Nothing to do put see if the areas come back or reseed the end of the season if that is what happened.

Do keep a watchful eye to see if the patches grow in size. In which case, especially if you watering late, you have a fungus amongus I would guess.

Any matching patches in neighboring lawns by the way?

If you suspect a fungus, and your mower came with a bag? You might want to collect the clippings. You will just scatter the fungus spores mulching the clippings.

Breakthecycle2 06-07-2011 09:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 663025)
If you are using hose end sprinklers, invest in a couple of timers you can pick up for $20 and try watering just before day break.

These brown spots sound like you may have caused a chemical burn in applying your weed and feed product---especially since they appeared immediately after. Nothing to do put see if the areas come back or reseed the end of the season if that is what happened.

Do keep a watchful eye to see if the patches grow in size. In which case, especially if you watering late, you have a fungus amongus I would guess.

Any matching patches in neighboring lawns by the way?

If you suspect a fungus, and your mower came with a bag? You might want to collect the clippings. You will just scatter the fungus spores mulching the clippings.

Actually, I have noticed some of the neighborhood has the same type of issue. Not my immediate neighbors, but houses in close proximity. If it is a fungus, what do I do?? The latest I water is 2PM, until 3-4PM.

user1007 06-08-2011 12:06 AM

If it is a fungus, you should treat it but I am not sure what you can by as a consumer. Ask your local nursery? Or like I said, swing by the maintenance shed for the parks district or a golf course near you. Bring donuts if you really want to make an impression.

If it is grubs, you can buy insectiside to help with them but not at the same strength someone licensed to apply the chemicals can. A lawn care specialist will probably be cheaper for you in the long run.

As mentioned, your ideal watering goal if you can pull it off is to have your turfgrasses dry by sundown. Nocturnal bugs like lawn moths and fungi spores find grasses dry overnight of almost no appeal at all.

Now then, if in talking with the turf folks in your area you determine it is a fungus. You will need to determine whether it is soil or plant oriented? Nonsense. You are talking small patches from what you said. Dig them out completely, prepare the soil and replant turf seed.


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