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Old 03-15-2009, 11:09 PM   #1
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Thuja "Green Giant"


I live in Zone 5, and need to plant 1 more Thuja Green Giant Arborvitae. The temps are now warming to 40's-60's during the day, and dropping to mid 20's-mid 30's at night.

Is it still too cold to plant, or is it OK? The soil/ground is now damp and soft.

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Old 03-16-2009, 06:03 PM   #2
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Thuja "Green Giant"


"Is it still too cold to plant, or is it OK? The soil/ground is now damp and soft."

Not really but I would probably wait a few more weeks. I'm in 7b, OK here. Actually, I moved a few shrubs about a month ago just before a rain front was coming in with 40 temps. As long as the ground's not frozen, it won't make any difference in being "too cold" to plant. However, your plant will just sit there more or less until the soil gets around 50*. That's when roots will start to develope. But, considering the last couple of years of drought here in the south, cold soil is better than dry soil!

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Old 03-16-2009, 08:00 PM   #3
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Thuja "Green Giant"


I'm in 6A, and I've been moving big shrubs all week. Just make sure you cover all surface roots with a good layer of mulch.

Green Giants are very hardy, at least around here.
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Old 03-26-2009, 07:34 PM   #4
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Thuja "Green Giant"


You can actually move woody stuff anytime in the winter. that's actually best and when they push the root growth.
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Old 03-27-2009, 12:44 PM   #5
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Thuja "Green Giant"


"You can actually move woody stuff anytime in the winter. that's actually best and when they push the root growth."

In zone 5?

Not my intention to sound negative here, but I would beg to differ on that information. That's pushing it in my zone 7. Could you cite any references for root growth in frozen ground for woodys, perennials, or anything else for that matter? I really hope I'm wrong on this because I may learn something new, not that I'm planning on moving anytime soon. But I believe it is a disservice to posters who come here looking for help when personal opinion and folklore is espoused as truth.
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Old 03-27-2009, 05:27 PM   #6
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Thuja "Green Giant"


I've lived in zone 5 and it can be done. Late fall (there it's October) and early spring (March) is fine. I assuming that if you can't get a shovel in the ground he's not going to try and plant. It is not uncommon for trees to be planted in that zone provided the ground is not frozen. And yes root growth pushes in cool season grasses and most woody plants, including trees in the winter and will grow in frozen soil which actually have a lot of air pockets which is where the roots go anyway. The summer is, by and large for, top growth and storing up carbs for, winter root growth and winter breakout. Pernnials are dormant. Farmers plant trees in the fall and into early winter and through the winter if the ground is not frozen. it give the staock a head start in the spring.

Don't have a lot of studies at hand only 40+ years of experience all up and down the east coast and mid-west. If it hasn't work for me I wouldn't post it. I'm not out to mess folks up.
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Old 03-27-2009, 05:29 PM   #7
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Thuja "Green Giant"


The other thing you need to do is read the original post. If he's zone 5 hes on the edge. He posts in january with day time temps of 40-60's with soil damp and soft. Sound's like Atlanta to me!
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Old 03-27-2009, 06:12 PM   #8
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Thuja "Green Giant"


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dugger52 View Post
The other thing you need to do is read the original post. If he's zone 5 hes on the edge. He posts in january with day time temps of 40-60's with soil damp and soft. Sound's like Atlanta to me!
Try again - Zone 5 is up North

I'm in Zone 6 & do not plant/transplant until April/May
I actually try to move a lot of stuff in the late Fall



Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 03-27-2009 at 06:15 PM.
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Old 03-27-2009, 06:54 PM   #9
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Thuja "Green Giant"


Well I tried to get him to tell us where he/she lived and I've gotten nothing. I'll admidt it doesn't sound like zone 5 to me either but that's what he said. Based on what he said plant away!!! A city and state would be nice.
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Old 03-27-2009, 06:58 PM   #10
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Thuja "Green Giant"


dave was talking about the type of weather, that is it doesn't sound like 5 to me. Live in Athens, GA for three years, sixty miles east of Atlanta and he's describing is the winter there (mostly).
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Old 03-27-2009, 09:43 PM   #11
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Thuja "Green Giant"


I'm not sure how deep a hole you need
That would be my only fear if the ground might still be frozen
I'm still getting ice on my pond/pool some nights

I looked up the plant & it said they transplant fairly easy
The zones I referred to are planting zones (map)
We have the same weather right now to 40-60 in the day, 20-30 at nite
Grasses & weeds (roots) actually do grown in the winter
I know from pulling up stuff & transplanting ion the fall myself
That's one reason they say to use Winter fertilizer for your lawn

Where is the plant now?
Or are you buying it? Transplanting it from somewhere?
List your state so people have an idea of where you are

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