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-   -   Sump pump pit never opened to ground water (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/sump-pump-pit-never-opened-ground-water-147578/)

Standav 06-19-2012 12:35 PM

Sump pump pit never opened to ground water
 
I bought a house 2 years ago. It was built in 2003. The basement has a sump pump pit but the knock outs or area where the tile would come in were never opened, so no sump pump has ever been installed. Last year I never had any issues with water, but this year I have had a few instances where water has came in through the seems. It has been minimal but I would like to finish the basement and stop this issue before it worsens. I have a few questions.

1.) Is there going to be drain tile on the other side of the sump pit?
2.) Will installing a sump pump eliminate this problem?
3.) I'm assuming I need to get a pump installed and plumbed before opening the pit up.

Any advice is appreciated.

oh'mike 06-19-2012 12:39 PM

Answer this---do you have another sump pit that does have a pump in it?

Standav 06-19-2012 12:44 PM

There are no other sump pits. This is the only one.

oh'mike 06-19-2012 12:52 PM

That's odd---often there is one sump pit and one sewage pit---I figured that was an unused sewage pit.

If you slice slits into the sides of the pit--it will relieve pressure under the slab--

Odd that you don't have exterior footing drain tiles leading to the pit.

Is your home built into a hill with a walk out basement?(Daylight drainage?)

Standav 06-19-2012 01:03 PM

I misunderstood, there is a sewer pit, but that is completely sealed. The basement is pumbed for a full bath. I was only talking about the sump pit for ground water.

AllanJ 06-19-2012 01:15 PM

The sump pit by itself, with some holes or slits in the sides and also a sump pump, will protect against basement flooding within an approximately four foot radius around it.

To get protection all the way around the basement you would normally need nearly horizontal drain tiles or perforated drain pipes aka a French drain all the way around the foundation under floor level, either just inside or just outside, those pipes emptying into the pit.

If the foundation and basement floor were built atop coarse gravel rather than sand or soil, the drainage into the pit may be fast enough to protect the entire basement without the need for perforated pipes.

Standav 06-19-2012 01:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AllanJ (Post 947025)
The sump pit by itself, with some holes or slits in the sides and also a sump pump, will protect against basement flooding within an approximately four foot radius around it.

To get protection all the way around the basement you would normally need nearly horizontal drain tiles or perforated drain pipes aka a French drain all the way around the foundation under floor level, either just inside or just outside, those pipes emptying into the pit.

If the foundation and basement floor were built atop coarse gravel rather than sand or soil, the drainage into the pit may be fast enough to protect the entire basement without the need for perforated pipes.

I read somewhere that on newer houses they usually put perferated drain tile around the foundation and connect it to the sump pit. In a perfect world, I was hoping to cut into my sump pit and find these tiles on the other side. Is this likely?

AllanJ 06-19-2012 02:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Standav (Post 947039)
I read somewhere that on newer houses they usually put perferated drain tile around the foundation and connect it to the sump pit. In a perfect world, I was hoping to cut into my sump pit and find these tiles on the other side. Is this likely?

Most likely there are no drain tiles. But even if there were drain tiles, you might have to demolish much of the pit wall to find the tiles. You would not know at what depth any existing drain tiles would want to enter the pit nor where along the circumference of the pit the pipes are.

You might want to start looking for drain tiles by cutting the basement floor about three feet from the pit and against the foundation wall. Usually the drain tiles are against the foundation footing which in turn is probably 8 inches to a foot below the floor surface.

oh'mike 06-19-2012 03:42 PM

Show us both pits--the open unused one and the sealed pit---

Standav 06-20-2012 04:42 PM

3 Attachment(s)
I have attached photos of the sewer pit, the sump pit and the inside of the sump pit.

oh'mike 06-20-2012 06:04 PM

A picture of the piping coming out of that pit will be needed---I bet that one contains your perimeter drain pipes----I know that it's sealed up---but opening it would give you the true answer--and not our guesses.

Standav 06-20-2012 07:22 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Well, I think your right. I never checked that because when I had the house inspected the inspector said that was for the removal of the waste for the bathroom that is in the basement. I'm assuming he didn't know what he was talking about, or did he? I guess if I have this working and only one point where water is seeping in, then I need to install a french drain or something.

oh'mike 06-20-2012 09:03 PM

What happen when you run water in that bathroom?

That looks like a sewage line (PVC) as opposed to the typical footing drain (Black corrugated pipe)

Standav 06-21-2012 07:12 AM

The bathroom in the basement is nonexistant. There is some plumbing for it, if we ever decide to finish the basement in the bathroom, but there isn't a faucet or toliet.

Standav 06-21-2012 09:22 AM

2 Attachment(s)
There is a vertical crack down my foundation. It is leaking water into the basement. I have read a lot about this but not sure the right path to take. I was assuming that if I opened the sump pit and pumped out ground water than it may stop. Here is a photo of the crack. Should I leave the sump alone, and focus on patching this crack (from outside or inside?) and adding drain tile?


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