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RockingM82 02-10-2012 09:28 PM

Something for privacy in poorly draining back yard
 
I live in an old neighborhood in St. Louis, MO and the drainage in the back yard is not great. It isn't a swamp, but it will stay damp in the Spring. I would like to plant a hedge or trees that would grow to provide privacy from the neighboring yards. I'm looking for 8 ft or greater. The distance to cover is probably about 70 feet.

Any recommendations on vegetation type?

joecaption 02-10-2012 09:36 PM

Look around, what's already growing wild in that area?
Get a soil sample and take it to your local green house and ask them.
This site has people from all over the world. Not likly anyone here is going to be able to help.

juryduty 02-14-2012 12:41 AM

Try Bamboo. I think there are varieties that grow all over the U.S. and tolerate a wide variety of soils. Google around, there are some companies on the web that specialize in it.

Bondo 02-14-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RockingM82 (Post 850014)
I live in an old neighborhood in St. Louis, MO and the drainage in the back yard is not great. It isn't a swamp, but it will stay damp in the Spring. I would like to plant a hedge or trees that would grow to provide privacy from the neighboring yards. I'm looking for 8 ft or greater. The distance to cover is probably about 70 feet.

Any recommendations on vegetation type?

Ayuh,... So regrade the yard for Drainage, Then put in yer shrubs...

GardenConcepts 02-14-2012 08:03 PM

Don't plant Bamboo- you will regret it when it engulfs your entire yard and you can't get rid of it.

Look into Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) and Dawn Redwood (Metasequoia glyptostroboides). They both love wet soil and will tolerate average soil conditions. River Birch, Red Maple, and Black Gum also like wet soils.

wildrush01 02-20-2012 11:43 PM

as to the bamboo, you can easily control the spread...lol by digging in a 3' retainerwall into the ground to prevent the spread of outer growth (roots). as to the water issue, water seeks the lowest level. find a good spot and dig in a collection barrell, ie. a three to four foot long piece of colvert (plastic) about 2' round drill half to 3/4 inch holes sporatically all over it, put it in the ground surrounding it with rocks (river,or gravel, busted concrete) etc. about six inches worth includeing the bottom of barrel. this will attract water like a magnet. drop a sump pump with auto float switch in it so it turns on and off by level of water and run a drain line from it to where it can move freely from your yard. ie., your front yard to street. we usually cover the hole with a large flag stone or simillar, and put a decorative pot or something on top. it:thumbup:s amazing how well this drains a yard rapidly.

user1007 02-22-2012 11:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by juryduty (Post 853048)
Try Bamboo. I think there are varieties that grow all over the U.S. and tolerate a wide variety of soils. Google around, there are some companies on the web that specialize in it.

Careful the bamboo recommendation!!!! Even if you could raise Panda Bears they could only control part of what you see above ground.

There indeed species of bamboo that will do well in St. Louis. I used to incorporate lots of it into landscape designs because it can make a beautiful, drop-dead-gorgeous, low-maintenance, pest-free, living screen and windbreak. And, you will have an endless supply of stakes for tacky ticki torches and wind chimes. But I knew the species I was planting. And if ever I used more aggressive species, I planted within buried PVC or concrete drain pipe sleeves so the roots and rhyzomes could not crawl. Once some species get away from you? Bamboo will be all over your yard and into your neighbors' too! You will need a Bobcat at the very least to dig it out and this need will arise faster than you can imagine and be a regular landscape maintenance nightmare. Once planted without sleeves mentioned to contain it? Bamboo is near impossible to get rid of.

Also, even bamboo is not going to like growing with constantly soggy roots. Few but actual swamp plants will.

You really need to address your grading and drainage issues before planting anything or you will waste a lot of money on plant materials. Some of the plants mentioned might take hold in soggy soil but even they will not make it in wet soil. Make sure to correct your soil Ph before spending too much on plants also. Sorry, but do not shoot the messenger. :wink:


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