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Old 12-15-2009, 07:33 PM   #1
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slate walkway


what is the best material to put under slate for a walkway? I have already put down RCA for strength. do I use sand or crushed stone or what ?




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Old 12-15-2009, 08:36 PM   #2
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What is your local (wherever you may be) definition of RCA and what are the local options?

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Old 12-15-2009, 08:38 PM   #3
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I have no idea what RCA stands for. My slate backyard walkway is built on coarse sand, and has stood up for about 20 years no problem.
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Old 12-17-2009, 10:40 PM   #4
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I am curious too about RCA and what it means.

Your slate is thick enough to stand up as walkway, yes?
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Old 12-18-2009, 10:43 AM   #5
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Depends on your local climate; where are you?

RCA is recycled concrete aggregate.
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:07 AM   #6
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It sounds like you would like to have a dry laid application. If the RCA is a type of aggregate, make sure that it is at least 4" thick and laid on soil that has not been disturbed.

You could use sand for the next layer and also for the joints. A dry laid application of slate would be similar to that for pavers. This might help.
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You do not need the edge restraint.
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:33 AM   #7
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It's a pleasure reading your posts and surfing your website, Susan.
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Old 12-19-2009, 09:52 AM   #8
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Thank you so much!
By the way...love your Golden pic
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Old 12-19-2009, 10:01 AM   #9
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Thx...one of two we have. This one is what is known up here as an American Golden, as it has similarities with an American setter. The other one is a real Golden retriever. Brings me my tools whenever I need them.
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Old 12-19-2009, 10:35 AM   #10
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We have a 3 year old and lost two too old age in the past few years. They are wonderful dogs. Brings you your tools? Cool!
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Old 12-19-2009, 01:21 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
I have no idea what RCA stands for. My slate backyard walkway is built on coarse sand, and has stood up for about 20 years no problem.
Daniel, I live on Long Island, NY RCA is recycled concrete aggragate - the slate I have will hold up for a walkway. I was watching Home Tele & thet reccommend crushed granite, but if coarse sand will work I'll try it. It's probably cheaper too. Marty
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Old 12-19-2009, 01:23 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Susan Schlenger View Post
It sounds like you would like to have a dry laid application. If the RCA is a type of aggregate, make sure that it is at least 4" thick and laid on soil that has not been disturbed.

You could use sand for the next layer and also for the joints. A dry laid application of slate would be similar to that for pavers. This might help.
Paver Installation

You do not need the edge restraint.
Susan, Thanks for your reply I will take your advice & mull it around with other suggestions I have gotten. Marty
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Old 12-19-2009, 02:01 PM   #13
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Granite is a rock composed of a variety of minerals, including quartz, feldspar, biotite, and others. Once crushed, granite behaves essentially identically to sand, which is sillicon dioxide (quartz). There is no reason to go to the trouble to obtain crushed granite when sand will work just as well, be more readily available, and be less expensive.
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Old 12-19-2009, 03:22 PM   #14
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Marty,
Your welcome! Good luck with your project.
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Old 12-21-2009, 06:02 AM   #15
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Around here in the northern tip of Illinois ( clay) crushed roadbed gravel

( limestone here) is used 3/4" down to fines, vibrator compacted in ( in layers) for pavers.

The crushed rock is angular which locks tight together under the weight and vibrations ( use plenty of water to force out the air).

I was told 6" thick to guarantee the work by a well known contractor here.( I did 7-8")

Then 1/2 to 1" of course sand for final leveling.

Then polymeric sand ( http://www.supersandbond.com/) is used on top for between the joints and vibrated in with a rubber padded vibrator compactor.

This is how pavers are done correctly in this area, I don't know about slate.

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