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Old 06-20-2009, 09:49 PM   #1
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Retaining wall contruction questions.


One side of my pole barn was built on a raised soil base. Over the last 8 years, the soil has slowly been eroding away. I have some pictures but I don't think I can attach them.
Anyway, I am trying to figure out the best option for a retaining wall. I happen to have nine 6"x8"x18' logs left over from our log home construction. I would like to use these since I need to get them out of my garage and they are free They are not treated so I would need some way to treat them for outdoor exposure to water and dirt. Does anyone know how I could treat these logs to use for the retaining wall? Also, is this even a feasible solution?
I have also considered using treated plywood with veritical support posts.
The wall would only need to be about 2 1/2 feet tall.
Thank you for any help you can provide.

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Old 06-20-2009, 10:00 PM   #2
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Retaining wall contruction questions.


You are a dreamer if you think you can treat the logs to be good enough for even a temporary fix.

Even the large treaters with a big buget can only only produce reasonably "permanent" timber materials with high concentrations.

You would be better off using the logs in your fireplace when it gets colder.

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Old 06-20-2009, 10:08 PM   #3
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Retaining wall contruction questions.


There's a reason they find fossils in rocks.....they last for millions of years, unlike wood. Use a concrete block,natural stone or poured wall to retain soil and it will last. bill
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Old 06-21-2009, 08:03 AM   #4
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Retaining wall contruction questions.


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Originally Posted by woodnthings View Post
There's a reason they find fossils in rocks.....they last for millions of years, unlike wood. Use a concrete block,natural stone or poured wall to retain soil and it will last. bill
I had considered using retaining wall blocks but I was unsure if it was a project I could do successfully. Are there some directions someone could point me to which has pictures of the process to follow?
thanks.
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Old 06-21-2009, 08:43 AM   #5
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Retaining wall contruction questions.


To get installation instructions, go to the sites for the major licensors (Allan Block, Anchor Wall systems or Versalok). The different units units have minor variation in appearance, but the installation in pretty much the same for all. - Never use a concrete footing.

These units are manufactured by block producers in virtually every country, so you should have several in your area.

Dick
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