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-   -   New lawn in Ohio (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/new-lawn-ohio-84341/)

drb753 10-19-2010 10:19 AM

New lawn in Ohio
 
My new home does not have grass. The landscaper graded the yard but was not able to rouckhound because of a weak of heavy rains. Now he wont put the lawn in because he does not want to guarantee its growth due to it being so late in the year. Is it OK to leave it as bare dirt until the Spring or do I need to do something to stabilize it until Spring. Thanks!

GardenConcepts 10-20-2010 01:51 PM

Your landscaper should at least put down a layer of straw to prevent erosion. If you have any significant slope, you should ask for erosion fabric to be installed.

downunder 10-20-2010 07:10 PM

I'm not sure which I am more disgusted with.

Unless you are having seriously cold temperatures this early, there is absolutely no problem with putting in a lawn now. You didn't say whether you mean seed or sod but it really doesn't matter but you can go a little later with sod because you are not trying to germinate anything but just getting roots established, i.e. basically just transplanting.

In most areas, it is against the law to leave bare soil exposed. There are state laws and FEDERAL regulations regarding this. I would suggest checking this with your local codes office that handles eroision and sediment control issues. Beyond that, I don't want to address Ohio law from Georgia.

Edit:
This link will give you a starting understanding-
http://codes.ohio.gov/oac/1501%3A15-1

jasoninct 10-20-2010 07:10 PM

Don't leave it bare soil over the winter. There will be wind erosion if the soil is frozen and not covered with snow or ice. When the ground thaws in the spring there will be significant erosion with the thaw and spring rains.

To get something to go use a contractor mix of grass seed. Generally a blend of 50% perrenial rye grasses and or fescues and 50% annual rye. The annual rye will germinate in 5 to 10 days if it gets lightly watered daily but most will perrish over the winter but the roots they generate will greatly reduce erosion. The perrenial rye grasses will germinate in 10 to 14 days and will survive the winter and fescues will germinate in about the same time and will also survive the winter and offer a nice textured, drought, pest and traffic resistant lawn.

Put some seed on the lawn yourself. Then have your landscaper come and do an overseeding in the spring. That will guarantee you a nice lawn for next year

jasoninct 10-20-2010 07:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by downunder (Post 520339)
In most areas, it is against the law to leave bare soil exposed. There are state laws and FEDERAL regulations regarding this. I would suggest checking this with your local codes office that handles eroision and sediment control issues. Beyond that, I don't want to address Ohio law from Georgia.

In CT a new construction home can not be closed on until there is at least grass seed planted on the soil.

downunder 10-20-2010 07:18 PM

Quote:

Put some seed on the lawn yourself.
H.... NO! Tell him to get off his sorry ### and do it.

jasoninct 10-21-2010 09:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by downunder (Post 520352)
H.... NO! Tell him to get off his sorry ### and do it.

I agree. A rock hound can be used as long as the ground isn't frozen. In october, the ground in ohio is not frozen. Maybe you should find another landscaper.

downunder 10-22-2010 07:35 AM

drb753,
We skipped over this but what has your weather (other than the rainy spell you mentioned) been like recently and what is your next two weeks expectations?

Oops! 10-30-2010 07:48 PM

He should do it now. This is a good time of year for it.


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