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-   -   New House & Need Serious Help (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/new-house-need-serious-help-5518/)

Jamila 12-21-2006 08:48 PM

New House & Need Serious Help
 
Hello,

We just moved into our first house.

I have always wanted a garden to grow our own veggetables, and a place for my children to run and play. We have a huge backyard with plenty of room for both however there is a problem. The yard is tilted, running away from the back of our home. I would much prefer it to be even.

How can I make it even?

Thank you for reading.

Best Regards,
Jamila

majakdragon 12-24-2006 07:40 AM

By adding fill dirt you can level it out. Make sure you don't over-do it and make water run back towards the house. You could add fill in the area you want the garden in and use landscape timbers to raise the rear section to make the garden area level. This would allow excess water to still drain away from your foundation. You could also build a raised bed garden using the landscape timbers.

Jamila 12-24-2006 11:56 AM

Fill Dirt
 
I found that a lot of people in this area offer free dirt, from after they demolish their homes. Is this dirt ok to use?

After I put dirt down, how do I make it green again?

majakdragon 12-24-2006 03:37 PM

Dirt from a demo may be okay if you don't mind picking the trash (wood, cement etc) out of it. You'll need to plant grass seed in it after you get it leveled and cleaned. You may also need some topsoil if it is clay type dirt.

Tscarborough 12-24-2006 11:41 PM

It can be simple or complex. Take a bowl of water filled to the brim into the back yard at the low point of the yard. Sight along the water level and align it with the high point of the yard. Have someone measure from the water level to the ground. Take that dimension, multiply by the on the ground distance from where you stand and multiply by the width of the yard. Divide by 2 and that is the amount of dirt you will need. As an example, say you measure 3 feet to the water level, the distance was 50 feet on the ground and the width of your yard was 25 feet. 3x50x25=3750, 3750/2=1875 CuFt, or 69.44 CuYd or about 5 truckloads of fill.

That assumes that you will create a retaining wall. Note that any wall over 3' should be engineered.

EZ Rider 12-31-2006 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tscarborough (Post 27794)
It can be simple or complex. Take a bowl of water filled to the brim into the back yard at the low point of the yard. Sight along the water level and align it with the high point of the yard. Have someone measure from the water level to the ground. Take that dimension, multiply by the on the ground distance from where you stand and multiply by the width of the yard. Divide by 2 and that is the amount of dirt you will need. As an example, say you measure 3 feet to the water level, the distance was 50 feet on the ground and the width of your yard was 25 feet. 3x50x25=3750, 3750/2=1875 CuFt, or 69.44 CuYd or about 5 truckloads of fill.

That assumes that you will create a retaining wall. Note that any wall over 3' should be engineered.

Another, cheap but accurate method of determining level grade is to take a garden hose that is long enough to reach the desired distance, hook it up and run enough water through it to remove all the air, then unhook from the faucet. Have a friend help you by each taking one end of the hose and sealing the ends with your hand. One goes to the house and puts his end down to ground level, while the other takes his end of the hose out to the end of where you want to level. Eyeball both ends of hose to get close to level and then both uncover the ends of the hose. The person on the distant end then slowly moves his end of the hose up or down until the water just barely wants to come out. At that point the two hose ends are level (water in the hose seeks its own level just like in a carpenter level) and you can then measure down to the ground to determine level grade. Deduct for how much drainage slope you want per foot of distance, and then do the same calculations as in your method above. This method works well if you are going around obstacles or around the corner of a building where you can't sight it as you described in the first method.

Good luck,

Dave

handy man88 03-23-2007 12:28 PM

I wouldn't use the fill dirt. Fill dirt has almost zero nutrients, and if used, should be screeted to filter out rocks and debris. What you should do is have a retaining wall installed at the very edge and have top soil put in. Then, you must resod or reseed.


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