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-   -   Need tips on winterizing lawn irrigation system...size of compressor etc. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/need-tips-winterizing-lawn-irrigation-system-size-compressor-etc-86138/)

Hossenfeffer 11-08-2010 10:16 AM

Need tips on winterizing lawn irrigation system...size of compressor etc.
 
I moved into a house last Feb. that has an inground system. Never had one before, and winter can get just chilly enough here to do damage.

The local maintenance company seems too busy to show up and winterize the system for me....and I could save some money just by blowing out the system myself.

Any tips on size of compressor to use? I guess my longest run of pipe is about 100 feet and most zones are much shorter. Maximum of 4 heads on any one zone here.

Can one do damage by using too much pressure?

I see some regular water tap fittings in the contron box. This looks like the spot to connect the compressor. Is that how it is done? Do the compressors have fittings to attach onto regular water taps/spouts?

Thanks for any tips.

ojee001 11-08-2010 10:24 AM

Too much pressure can damage your valves limit yourself to 50psig and you should be ok. I bleed my system using a 25 gallon compressor it's long because the compressor turns on quite often but not that bad. As for the fittings go to any of the big box stores and you will figure it out, essentially the quickest is to use flex hose (eg the clear ones they sell) with the metal connectors you screw on tight.

cgoll 11-09-2010 03:43 PM

I just did mine using a 12 gallon compressor. Bigger is definitely better. You don't need pressure higher than 50 psi, but more volume would have helped. I did some zones twice to be sure. Next year Iíll borrow a neighbor's compressor and see if I can gang them together to get more volume.

Important: Donít forget to drain the backflow preventer! You could connect at the control box, but that wonít clear the backflow preventer. Expensive item to crack!

ClassicLighting 11-26-2010 02:10 PM

THe OP didn't mention if this is a well water or city water. On an above ground centrifugal pump, disconnect the power, remove the drain plug and connect there. On city water, turn off the main water supply (preferably before the backflow) and connect to a the test****. Concerning the compressor, CFM is what matters (low psi, high volume). I'd recommend a minimum of 20 CFM and about 50 psi for an average residential.

Better yet, rather than trying to figure it all out and collect all the required parts, call your local irrigation company. Would you rather spend hours trying to figure this out or pay around $50-75 and be done with it?

jameswleroy 11-30-2010 02:41 AM

I agree I paid 45.00 to have my guy come in and do it.

bob22 12-01-2010 08:00 PM

I read somewhere not to let the air come out of the emitters for too long (I assume ones that move/rotate) as they can overheat and be damaged.

ClassicLighting 12-01-2010 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bob22 (Post 543919)
I read somewhere not to let the air come out of the emitters for too long (I assume ones that move/rotate) as they can overheat and be damaged.

You are correct. OR call a pro and you don't have to worry about overheating the system components or breaking it. How much time and effort will you waste in order to save $45?

cgoll 12-02-2010 11:25 AM

Unfortunately, it is not $45 around here (Northern NJ). The guy who installed my system did it "off the books" for $75 cash last year. A friend at work was quoted $140! He is, however, closer to New York city, so higher prices may prevail.

Obviously, big differences, both regional and contractor-to-contractor.

oberkc 12-02-2010 01:14 PM

Also, the original post suggested that the local company was "too busy" to even take the job.


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