DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Landscaping & Lawn Care (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/)
-   -   My New Tree!!! (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/my-new-tree-160807/)

knotquiteawake 10-22-2012 09:19 AM

My New Tree!!!
 
Finally got a tree to replace the dead Maple I had to have removed. Here is the before and after and also a nice close up of it.

Its a Lacebark Elm tree, was in a 65 gallon container before planting. Finally feel like I'm making progress on the front yard!

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-r...eforeafter.jpg

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-C...017_091216.jpg

My wife refused to have a twig in our front yard so we had to go with a much larger tree to start with.

user1007 10-22-2012 09:23 AM

Looks nice and although expensive I am sure? It does already look like a tree.

I know it sounds radical but first thing you should do is prune it. Now is the time to get rid of any structural problems the nursery did not take care of. Get rid of crossing branches and water shoots for sure. Prune to encourage the central leader. Taking about 1/3 of the top growth will encourage strong root growth. Pruning will also promote stronger branches.

Might wait until it goes dormant though.

Congratulations.

knotquiteawake 10-22-2012 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 1035613)
Looks nice and although expensive I am sure? It does already look like a tree.

I know it sounds radical but first thing you should do is prune it. Now is the time to get rid of any structural problems the nursery did not take care of. Get rid of crossing branches and water shoots for sure. Prune to encourage the central leader. Taking about 1/3 of the top growth will encourage strong root growth. Pruning will also promote stronger branches.

Might wait until it goes dormant though.

Congratulations.

We've been saving up for it since the old tree was removed. We're debt free (apart from the house) thanks for Dave Ramsey, so we paid for it with cash we had on hand.
I got allergy tested the other week and found out I am VERY allergic to oaks and only a little allergic to Elm. The only size they had for Lacebark (which was hard to find in of itself) was this huge 65 gallon tree, I would have been happy with 45gallon and up.

Yes... expensive, $599 plus what they charged for installation, but I did get 10% on it. To us its worth the price to have something that looks good right off the bat.


I need some more information about pruning. It is a tangle of branches right now, is this something the avg home owner can figure out? What to chop?
I would like to shape the tree a bit to encourage growth out to the side and up and not towards the house as much.

user1007 10-22-2012 10:09 AM

You should not be casual about pruning or go crazy without a plan. Just remember trees cannot prune themselves and don't be shy about it. And, it is a lot easier to deal with potential problems that can be handled with pruning shears or a lopper than when they mature and require surgery and chainsaw work.

Get some books specific to your species from the library or see if your municipal or university arborist has guides. Once you find some that make sense, it is handy to have your own copies.

Make sure you have well oiled and sharp pruning shears, saws, loppers, etc. Keep cutting edges clean and it is not a bad idea to dip them in Clorox between cuts.

For your first pruning things you should look for and remedy to start:

- Water shoots. These often grow perpindicular to branch structure and look different than branches. They may pop up around the base of the tree. Get rid of them.

- Inward growing branches. Branches that are growing inward are likely to cause you problems later and will not be healthy since they will be starved for light.

- Branches crossing and touching each other or forming dangerous "crotches" that can hold water will come to haunt you.

- Shoots on the bottoms of branches (most trees except fruit spurs) will just weigh down branches later.

- Trees should usually have just one leader.

- Long, lanky branches should be cut back to buds to encourage stronger and more wind and snow resistant limbs. Prune just above a bud. This is a good way to shape your young tree as well.

- You may need to prune out some future sail effect and open the tree up so all branches get lots of light and air.

- A nicely pruned tree should look nice structurally and have lots of airspace between branches and limbs.

Jess_718 10-28-2012 07:41 PM

Tree
 
Beautiful tree. It really adds to your curb side appeal of your home!

Great pic!

Fix'n it 10-28-2012 09:16 PM

$600 = :eek:

user1007 11-04-2012 09:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fix'n it (Post 1039987)
$600 = :eek:

It doesn't sound so outrageous to me for nice, guaranteed nursery stock that size. And it is a tree already.

How did its first pruning work out?


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:38 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved