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-   -   Leveling the slope toward my neighbor.... (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/leveling-slope-toward-my-neighbor-19050/)

Wanttodoitright 03-26-2008 05:37 PM

Leveling the slope toward my neighbor....
 
The side yard between my house and my neighbor's privacy fence slopes away from my house. That's great for drainage, but my wife wants to plant a vegetable garden there, as it gets most of the sun.

What is the best solution to level the yard (which is only about 9 feet wide), without adding undo stress on the fence?

I really want to build her a raised garden bed, but I would need to level the area anyway, in order for the bed to be level.

I am figuring about only needing about 2.5-3 cubic yards to bring the area level, not including extra for the raised bed.

Maybe adding boards along the bottom of the fence would be sufficient? Or is that not enough extra dirt to really matter?

Any thoughts will be appreciated!

Mr Chips 03-27-2008 04:38 PM

regarding the raised bed option: you would NOT have to level the ground underneath just make sure your posts are set Level to each other

dchaban 04-16-2008 04:04 PM

think opposite
 
Instead of bringing in fill, how about cutting out to be level from the fence base?
perhaps some landscaping timbers or a 2-3 level retaining wall with 1 step could bring the grade from the house down to a fence-level garden area.:wink:

Randell Tarin 04-16-2008 05:58 PM

1 Attachment(s)
If the area in question is acting as a drainage area, then you don't want to impede the flow of water. If you stop the drainage away from your house, then there is always the potential of water damage to your home.

If you terrace your raised bed, then the water may still drain from your house, but may or may not flood your garden. What to do? What to do?

I would recommend the following:

1. Place a layer of course gravel (1-1/2"-2" dia) on the low side of where your bed will run.

2. Onto to this run a length of perforated flexable 4" pipe wrapped in landscape fabric.

3. Cover this with another layer of gravel until the area is brought up to level
with the high side of the bottom of your raised bed.

4. The end of the perforated pipe should end up on the lowest section of your yard.

5. Cover the gravel with landscape fabric then add your soil back on top of this.

This should allow for proper drainage of your yard and of your raised bed.

call811beforeyoudig 04-23-2008 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Randell Tarin (Post 116896)
If the area in question is acting as a drainage area, then you don't want to impede the flow of water. If you stop the drainage away from your house, then there is always the potential of water damage to your home.

If you terrace your raised bed, then the water may still drain from your house, but may or may not flood your garden. What to do? What to do?

I would recommend the following:

1. Place a layer of course gravel (1-1/2"-2" dia) on the low side of where your bed will run.

2. Onto to this run a length of perforated flexable 4" pipe wrapped in landscape fabric.

3. Cover this with another layer of gravel until the area is brought up to level
with the high side of the bottom of your raised bed.

4. The end of the perforated pipe should end up on the lowest section of your yard.

5. Cover the gravel with landscape fabric then add your soil back on top of this.

This should allow for proper drainage of your yard and of your raised bed.

Great project tips! To add one more helpful piece of advice, before you start any digging project, like digging a pond or leveling your yard, call 811. It will make sure you won’t accidentally hit an underground utility line - which could hurt you and take out service to your entire neighborhood. So for your and your neighbors’ sake, check out our site for some info: http://www.call811.com/


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