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Old 10-06-2008, 11:11 AM   #16
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landscape irrigation system drip tubing


Netaphim. Check with John Deere Landscapes.
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Old 07-01-2009, 11:56 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by SECO Landscapes View Post
Of course, the ground doesn't freeze here, so I can's address "winterizing" the system. Having said that, we've installed miles of Netafim Techline CV.

Most landscapers in my area have little/no experience with it, and don't know how to install it properly. Actually, if you're handy, you can do it yourself, Netafim has excellent technical materials. A Y-filter & 30psi Low-Flow (.125-8gpm) filters are a MUST.

My favorite for planter beds is the .6gph / 12" spacing. Use only Netafim barb connectors, make sure you install it in a loop/grid. The Flush Cap that swade mentioned in the previous post is smart - it allows you to flush the entire line. Locate it "furthest" from where the water supply enters the "loop".

When cut/damaged, repairing it is easy - just cut out the damaged emitter & splice in a new one, or just use a barb connector to repair a cut, if you don't hit the emitter that is welded inside of the tubing.

We install the tubing on grade, and hold it in place with a few jute staples . After install, we go back & carve a channel 1" deep (claw hammer works well) & let the tubing drop in, cover with dirt & staple every 2' to hold it down.
I started this thread a year ago - and we finally recently made a decision to DIY retrofit and install Netafim on one zone of our existing irrigation system. Have put down 250 feet of Netafim in a loop and need to install some perpendicular lines to create grid to get good coverage on some areas. Now I'm worried we're getting too many feet for it to function properly. On supplier's recommendation, we bought the .9 emitters 12" Techline CV Netafim. Using 30 psi pressure regulator. Our water supply is 60 - 70 psi.

My question: If we go over the recommended number of feet, will it create severe problems and not function at all, or just have to run the zone for longer time?
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Old 07-01-2009, 01:58 PM   #18
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According to this cart http://www.netafimusa.net/downloads/...Sheet_4-05.pdf

(page 2-Maximum length of a single lateral)

You should be fine, you said you have a 250' in a loop, so the longest run would be 125'. The more you can "grid it out" the better the flow.

If your really concerned you can swap out that 30psi regulator for the 45 and increase any single lateral run to 311', but like I said, since you have it in a loop I dont think you will have any problems.
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Old 07-01-2009, 03:16 PM   #19
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Swade, I do not know what I would do without internet "friends." This project is about to worry us to death. Stopped working on it this morning because of fear I'd finish and find it wouldn't work. So now I can proceed. 100 degrees every day and no rain and can't go on vacation in the cool country because our 12-zone professionally installed system with about 100 sprays and rotors was so poorly designed that the only thing it accomplishes is green grass and high water bills, while I spend hours hand watering foundation shrubs and flowers. Many thanks for the help.
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Old 07-05-2009, 08:38 AM   #20
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I am to the stage of covering the Netafim with compost and mulch. Is there a preferred position for the emitters, up, down, sideways?

Thanks again.
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Old 07-05-2009, 11:50 AM   #21
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landscape irrigation system drip tubing


In my experience with it....no and if you had the patience to get them all the same direction I would be very concerned that you are ocd. Obviously the closer the emmitter is to the ground the better, but the purpose is to saturate the soil, gravity will take care of that.

I would recomend running and flushing the zone before you mulch. Makes finding and fixing any obstructions easier.

Good luck and congrats
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Old 07-05-2009, 08:47 PM   #22
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Installed 2 places to flush the system by inserting a T, then short piece of blank Netafim, and then fitting with screw-on cap that belongs to a different type system. So the system has been thoroughly flushed .

But have to ask: How does one repair an obstruction if it occurs? Also, if there are areas that get too wet, is there any way to purposely plug an emitter from the outside? Am thrilled with the system but do have some concerns about a couple of areas having plants close together that have very different water requirements.
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Old 07-05-2009, 09:17 PM   #23
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landscape irrigation system drip tubing


If you get a damaged section of pipe or obstruction just cut it out and get drip tube couplers from the same supplier you purchased the material from.

As far as the "hot zones" you can loop around the more needy plants or install "spaghetti" tubing with an emmitter to the base of those plants. Just explain what you have and what you want to do to the supplier, they will help you chose whats best.

Drip systems are great for what they do, apply watter directly to where you want it. They are however difficult at times to tweak because you cant see the watter and often wont see a problem until its too late.

On systems that I maintained ( years ago) I would take a soil plug around each area to monitor for hot spots and adjust run times, add a loop or the spaghetti tubing.

If you have an area that is too wet simply move the tubing further away / remove a loop (if able) or retrofit your grid. Thats the benifit of drip, you can always change it.
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Old 07-06-2009, 10:24 PM   #24
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The section we did with Netafim is working great. A couple of places will need some adjustment. This went so great, we want to do the remainder of the foundation areas. But we have used up all the zones on our 12-zone controller.

Sometime in the past I saw a part at one of the suppliers that from the label on it appeared to be for splitting a zone, some type of gizmo to be hooked up in the valve box. Now I can't remember where I saw it. Maybe I dreamed it . Is it possible to split one zone into two?
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Old 07-07-2009, 08:47 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by remodelingagain View Post
The section we did with Netafim is working great. A couple of places will need some adjustment. This went so great, we want to do the remainder of the foundation areas. But we have used up all the zones on our 12-zone controller.

Sometime in the past I saw a part at one of the suppliers that from the label on it appeared to be for splitting a zone, some type of gizmo to be hooked up in the valve box. Now I can't remember where I saw it. Maybe I dreamed it . Is it possible to split one zone into two?
]

There used to be a device called a "doubler" that would be installed on an existing valve to activate another. Acted like a switch, you would install the doubler on say zone 12, wire it to zone 12 valve and your new one (13). At the controller you would program a second run time for zone 12 either on a different program (most controller have A/B/C) or with in the same program. The "doubler" will toggle to the new valve, the next time its activated it will toggle back and so on.

They can be trickey to set up but once you have it they tend to work well. If memory serves they can be pricey, maybe upwards of 75.00 but that was a few years ago.

I will say this, if I had the funds and the ability, I would upgrade the size of the controller and install new wire....just makes troubleshooting anything in the field easier and the job more simple.

W/O seeing your site, what would be involved in adding wire or your "funds" your going to have to make that call.

You might also look into a battery operated solenoid. Typically run off of one or 2 9v batterys. Only downside is you dont know when its going to die. You just add a valve, set the timer on the solenoid for a time that the system is not typically running and your all set. We had a few sites that had very remote locations that needed water and it was a decent solution until they were able to spend the money to install a traditional system.

If you cant tell, I used to love irrigation, just after 12 years designing/installing/servicing I got burned out. I dont mind sharing my knowledge but when it comes time to installing one at my house, I payed to have it done.
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Old 08-13-2009, 05:01 PM   #26
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this kit has everything you need-
You can get a smaller or larger kit depending on your garden size

http://www.dripking.com/shop/kits/La...Irrigation+Kit
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Old 08-19-2009, 08:17 AM   #27
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The two zones that we retrofitted to be Netafim drip systems are working great except for one area getting too wet. This area has been a constant problem since our whole sprinkler system was installed 9 years ago because next to it there are 4 Hunter rotors in the lawn area set 30 feet apart in a square. They over spray the drip area. I have adjusted the rotors as much as possible and cannot stop this. Most serious problem is a large oak tree in the middle of this and stream from each of the 4 rotors hit the trunk of it as they make a pass. This tree has gotten sicker and sicker and now realized that the rotors hitting it causing it to be too wet is the problem.

Would it be possible to replace the rotors with, for instance, the Hunter adjustable arc nozzle 17A? Or can you suggest some other adjustable head to replace the rotors? Need adjustable heads because this St. Augustine lawn area is very irrgularly shaped, sort of like a squished square.

Thanks.
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