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NHtransplant 05-07-2013 07:35 AM

Killing poison ivy and other brush
 
Hi All,
I am trying to kill off a lot of poison ivy around my yard. I have started clearing some of the area where my lawn meets the woods around my house. I cleared it before things started to grow this spring and now that things are springing up I am seeing a lot of poison ivy poking through. I have a huge problem with it. It has grown up a lot of trees for so long that the vines are over an inch thick in some spots. I have branches of poison ivy coming off of some.
I have used various "poison ivy" killers over the last two years with varying success. Now I am looking for something that I can spray that will take out everything so I can be sure I've killed the poison ivy off.
Does anyone have any experience getting rid of it or any tips on what chemicals to use.
Thanks in advance.

user1007 05-07-2013 09:18 AM

Poison ivy and poison oak can be invasive so I do not envy the challenge ahead of you. Multiple application of a systemic, non-selective vegetation or brush killer will do the trick---eventually. Round-up comes to mind as one of the safest. You don't want to damage the tree if you can help it! Beware of ineffective, consumer packaged, gimmicky poison ivy/oak killers. They are, for the most part, a waste of money.

Someplace like a real nursery, garden center or farm supply will have more robust herbicides/brush killers. You may need a permit or applicator license to get them in some places. Please use only in the concentrations indicated on the labels. You will want to purchase a tank sprayer and mark it so you use it only for herbicides in the future.

You might also try brushing full strength herbicide on stems you cut. Sever vines close to the ground if you can. Use a disposable foam craft brush. Be careful not to get the stuff on your hands. Of course you should have gloves on, perhaps disposable ones, when working around poison plants too. Dispose of any debris properly so your pets do not roll in it and transfer the oils to you. If you burn the debris, be careful not to inhale it as you might end up with a nasty lung condition---rare but it happens.

A call to your university, county, or state ag extension office would be worth a try too. They may have some suggestions or even some vouchers for brush killers that might help you out. Good luck. This may take you a growing season or two! Make sure you know all the forms of poison ivy, poison oak and its evil cousins.

Bosma 06-02-2013 06:09 PM

Round up poison ivy killer worked great for me, put in a sprayer that attached to hose adjusted dial to slightly above what instructions said and soaked every damn inch of the leaves. I then went in and ripped up and cut the main roots (some were 3"). Roots I didn't want to dig up I poured the poison ivy killer on end of root several times.

If I could do it over again I wouldn't use round up i would just get a full body plastic suit, find the main roots and cut them, then maybe use roundup to catch what's left over.

creeper 06-02-2013 06:24 PM

I have read that salt will do it as well as Borax laundry soap. ( twenty mule team)

But before Stephen gets upset at me for recomending this solution of Borax I must warn you that it will render the soil sterile for a season or two or three. Nothing will grow in its spot, but at least you will be done with it for a reasonable amount of money

Gary in WA 06-02-2013 08:34 PM

Use with care, informative video; http://well.org/monsanto-roundup-doe...ght-must-read/

Gary

user1007 06-03-2013 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by creeper (Post 1193687)
I have read that salt will do it as well as Borax laundry soap. ( twenty mule team)

But before Stephen gets upset at me for recomending this solution of Borax I must warn you that it will render the soil sterile for a season or two or three. Nothing will grow in its spot, but at least you will be done with it for a reasonable amount of money

Jan, I have no issue with people using any reasonable herbicide properly. Many got banned because of some advice given on this site. "I know the label says 3 oz per gallon but I always used 4-5!" To me that is sort of like saying I would see better with two pairs of glasses or contact lenses on but some do not get the damage they suggest.

You can find borax formulas for use as herbicides all over the net. I don't think it is banned for sale in any US states, just banned in some for use as an outdoor herbicide. And because when too much is used it does render soil sterile for a long time. Unfortunately, State EPAs and soil management people cannot watch the consumer mixing the stuff.

The other sad thing that happens is pesticides and herbicides get dummied down for consumers to the point you could mix the whole bottle into a gallon and not hurt much, including the weeds or insects you were trying to control. They may or not work but I assure you those products that require licenses or permits will work much better.

Established vines of any kind are tough to kill. From my experience you have to dig them out if you can, keep cutting them off and painting the cut with a systemic brush killer, and keep spraying the leaves with a systemic weed or brush killer too. No single application or single approach is ever going to work.

And if you have a forest bordering your property full of poison ivy? The task, once you control what is going on, is to post one of the children in alternating shifts to scream if another vine crosses your property line.


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