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Old 05-31-2012, 12:42 AM   #1
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i'm looking for the best or hopefully a easy way to get rid of what looks like clover in our front lawn and we have bare spots any recommandation on something that would work on that .If i dig down in those spots and there is a green mesh is that what the sod came with?I'm just a dumb plumber please help
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Old 05-31-2012, 07:02 AM   #2
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The mesh would not have been part of the sod. It sounds like it was part of one of those matt systems that had seed, mulch, fertilizer and top dressing all bundled into one. The mesh was like backing on tile and kept it all as a unit.

You should identify the weed for sure before treating it with something that will not work. If it is clover something like Ortho Weed-B-Gone in spray form will get it eventually but you may need several applications. If you haven't (and it is late for Sacramento) you might lay down a Weed-N-Feed product assuming you have not already fed the turf with a time release product. You do not want to burn it. You can just get the weed part of it in granular form but you may need an applicator license or permit in California. PREEN is one brand consumers can get here. Make sure you get a POST EMERGENT and not a PRE EMERGENT herbicide for this though.

Roundup and a tank sprayer where you can control the stream of chemicals and reduce pressure to minimize overspray will do the trick. Roundup is a non-selective systemic herbicide and will kill most anything it touches.

Assuming you have a blade type turfgrass like perennial rye, bluegrass and fescue blend make sure you are mowing tall. You do not have a choice but to mow bermuda and ryzhome grasses shorter.

Last edited by user1007; 05-31-2012 at 07:06 AM.
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Old 05-31-2012, 08:10 PM   #3
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If the clover has little white flowers (only when in bloom), thats "white clover". It seems to be doing really well up here this year. But I don't think getting rid of it is going to be easy. Weed B Gon hurts it, but has trouble killing it. But I have not given up yet. Its tough up here, because just about anything that really works, is controlled. I called the pros for a price, but for $170 bucks ( 3 treatments), they were going to use Fiesta ---- which is just Weed B Gone, so I figured I might as well keep at it myself, pulling it and spraying it. Most of the info I have read says your lawn probably needs nitrogen if you have white clover.
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:56 AM   #4
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If the clover has little white flowers (only when in bloom), thats "white clover". It seems to be doing really well up here this year. But I don't think getting rid of it is going to be easy. Weed B Gon hurts it, but has trouble killing it. But I have not given up yet. Its tough up here, because just about anything that really works, is controlled. I called the pros for a price, but for $170 bucks ( 3 treatments), they were going to use Fiesta ---- which is just Weed B Gone, so I figured I might as well keep at it myself, pulling it and spraying it. Most of the info I have read says your lawn probably needs nitrogen if you have white clover.
It is too bad so many good herbicides now require an applicator license but consumers abused the stuff and there was no choice but to clamp down on sale of stuff that really worked well.

Clover does consume a lot of nitrogen so you might think about adding something almost pure in nitrogen like ammonium sulfate. Just water it in thoroughly so you do not burn the turf. And remember you will be feeding the clover too! Spray it with Weed-B-Gone awhile before feeding it.

Over nitrogenation is a big deal and US runoff is killing coral beds (and their ecosystems) and shrimp populations in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean so be careful.

And, you should probably get a soil test before adding too many fertilizers.
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:02 PM   #5
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It is too bad so many good herbicides now require an applicator license but consumers abused the stuff and there was no choice but to clamp down on sale of stuff that really worked well.

Clover does consume a lot of nitrogen so you might think about adding something almost pure in nitrogen like ammonium sulfate. Just water it in thoroughly so you do not burn the turf. And remember you will be feeding the clover too! Spray it with Weed-B-Gone awhile before feeding it.

Over nitrogenation is a big deal and US runoff is killing coral beds (and their ecosystems) and shrimp populations in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean so be careful.

And, you should probably get a soil test before adding too many fertilizers.

let us not forget, crabs and oysters in the Chesapeke Bay
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Old 06-01-2012, 05:51 PM   #6
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thanks for the info i know what you mean about the herbicides that require an applicator license.My wife read some were about cant think of the name TBE or something like that she kept arguing with me because i was not looking in the right places to buy it.come to find out its the same chemical as agent orange but before 1985 it commonly used to kill certain grasses.Anyway i do appreciate your guys knowledge.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:54 PM   #7
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Trimec or Mec-amine will get rid of most broad leave weeds (clover, ground ivy, dandelions) they will also get rid of crabgrass. Ortho Weed-b-Gone also contains the same active ingredients minus the MCCP which kills crabgrass. I do not know what the restricted use pesticide rules in California as I am from Iowa. If it is Unless white clover is actually overtaking and killing the grass I would let it grow. Once I get my ground ivy under control I am going over seed with some white clover. This is because the same herbicides that will kill ground ivy will also kill white clover. White clover does not consume nitrogen. It actually fixes nitrogen, it is a member of the pea family which are legumes there by reducing the nitrogen that you need to apply. Since it fixes nitrogen it make it an excellent forage crop as it is high in protein. The following URL is the fact sheet from the USDA http://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_trre3.pdf. The best thing to do is to identify the weed then read your chemical labels as to what it kills then mix and apply according to the label. Make sure you follow the label as the instructions are to protect both you and the environment. Just as some back ground I work in the ag industry and have my commercial pesticide applicators license. Just my two cents worth.
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Old 06-01-2012, 10:31 PM   #8
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I did not mean to suggest clover is not a great source of nitrogen when returned to the soil. It does draw a fair amount of nitrogen to grow though.
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Old 06-02-2012, 08:26 AM   #9
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thanks for the info i know what you mean about the herbicides that require an applicator license.My wife read some were about cant think of the name TBE or something like that she kept arguing with me because i was not looking in the right places to buy it.come to find out its the same chemical as agent orange but before 1985 it commonly used to kill certain grasses.Anyway i do appreciate your guys knowledge.
After Vietnam, leftover agent orange was used extensively as a forest management herbicide in Northern California until a rather scathing documentary came out. As if damage to Vietnam soldiers and their offspring were not evidence enough, the documentary showed orchard fruit mutated and looking like something out of a science fiction film. Human birth defects were showing up like 1:100 instead of 1:10,000,000. Dow argued it could be anything even though the only variable in the equation was use of the herbicide. Ronny was in the process of destroying the California environment so the governors office was not going to help even people having kids with no arms or legs.

They did stop using the stuff after the documentary hit. Whatever responsibility Dow took was buried in out of court settlements.
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Old 06-05-2012, 08:45 PM   #10
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Not sure what the rules are in California either but mecoprop is the best product for white clover. It come here in Canada in two forms for landscapers. Killex (a blend with two other herbicides, and as straight mecoprop)
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