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Old 03-14-2012, 08:00 PM   #1
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


I have a power handheld grinder and I was thinking I could use it to grind down a few small stumps. The biggest stump is about 4" in diameter and I cut it down to 2 or 3" above the ground. Would this work?

Grinding small stumps with hand grinder-image-1936866885.jpg

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Old 03-14-2012, 08:33 PM   #2
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


If it's small enough for something like that to work (it won't btw)...
then get out the mattock and shovel and DIG IT OUT.

hth

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Old 03-15-2012, 05:03 AM   #3
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder




can't tell if serious

Oh heck no. Not unless you want to be there all day. For several days.

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Old 03-15-2012, 01:11 PM   #4
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


I was kind of joking but at the same time was hoping someone would tell me they had done it before. My biggest concern was starting a fire with it. Lol. I have tried digging them out but the roots are so spread out that I can't seem to get a shovel in the ground anywhere near the stumps.
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Old 03-15-2012, 01:24 PM   #5
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


If your back can handle it, a pick axe would make quick work of it
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Old 03-15-2012, 02:24 PM   #6
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


Go out an get some copper sulphate, drill a hole down the center of the stump about 1" diameter and fill with copper sulphate. Wait about 2-3 mnths removal should be a sinch then.

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Old 03-15-2012, 02:33 PM   #7
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x 10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 000000000

FOR REAL
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Old 03-15-2012, 02:51 PM   #8
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


Quote:
Originally Posted by nikeman View Post
My biggest concern was starting a fire with it.
I think that the only fire danger would be inside your overtaxed grinder; other than that, nope, not gonna do the trick. I generally chip away at them a bit with an ax, to expose as much meat as possible, then sprinkle a hand full of dirt across the top, for whatever microorganisms the soil may contain, and repeat every couple of months until it's gone.
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:41 PM   #9
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


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Originally Posted by Jackofall1 View Post
Go out an get some copper sulphate, drill a hole down the center of the stump about 1" diameter and fill with copper sulphate. Wait about 2-3 mnths removal should be a sinch then.

Mark
Copper could leach and damage other plants subject to the run off. It is highly toxic to them. I wouldn't use it.
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:41 PM   #10
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


Quote:
Originally Posted by nikeman View Post
I have a power handheld grinder and I was thinking I could use it to grind down a few small stumps. The biggest stump is about 4" in diameter and I cut it down to 2 or 3" above the ground. Would this work?

Attachment 47514
I would use a buffing wheel and polish the stumps away. This should eliminate risk of sparks. Or a Dremel with a cutting blade.

Last edited by user1007; 03-15-2012 at 05:46 PM. Reason: Added Photo of Ideal Blade for Job
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Old 03-15-2012, 05:50 PM   #11
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


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Copper could leach and damage other plants subject to the run off. It is highly toxic to them. I wouldn't use it.
Really, a couple of ounces of copper sulphate.........I don't think so, what do you think they use in ponds to control algea, a 1" diameter hole 3" deep, a shot glass full is absorbed by the plant you are treating.

And yet you make fun of someone looking for answers

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Old 03-15-2012, 08:02 PM   #12
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


Okay,

So you don't really have the proper tool. If you are wanting to use that angle grinder to do this, it CAN be done.

But not with a wire brush.


Try one of these: http://www.kaindl-woodcarver.de/inde...nhandschleifer


I've actually used my circular saw do do the same thing on a small stump, so I know it'll work. PIA but it'll work....

I've also used a 1/2" heavy duty drill and a 1" bit to drill a lot of holes in a stump, and then went at it with the old mattock.


Both worked but the saw method was actually easier.


Just be careful!
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Old 03-15-2012, 08:07 PM   #13
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


The wrong tool for the job is a dangerous tool for the job.
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Old 03-17-2012, 08:20 PM   #14
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Grinding small stumps with hand grinder


Water the soil around the stumps really well, then get a straight rock bar (basically a long, heavy steel rod, can get them at the box stores) and start stabbing it under the surface roots. Once you get it under a root, give the rod a good push upward - the leverage should pull the root out. Walk around the tree and do this with all the surface roots. Then get the rod under the entire root ball and see if you can lever out the remaining roots.

This beats trying to hack the thing out, and it works in rocky areas where you can't shovel easily.

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