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-   -   Gravel Driveway Erosion Problem (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/gravel-driveway-erosion-problem-187907/)

Mills314 10-01-2013 11:48 PM

Gravel Driveway Erosion Problem
 
Gents, I have an issue with my gravel driveway. I recently returned from Afghanistan to find that the majority of my gravel driveway near my house has eroded into my yard. The grade from the garage to the yard is about 10%, however once you reach the yard, there is a steep hill running down towards the woods which causes water to seriously flow down said hill once it leaves the driveway. It is basically a turn around area, and the edge that I need some advice on is about 100' in length. I have considered a few options..........

-Putting in railroad ties as edging

-Forming and pouring a curb out of concrete

-Landscape stones

-Raking gravel back from the edge about 3' and putting some sod down after tilling up the earth and sewing it in with the yard

Any other options or anyone have any suggestions on this? I have managed to clean the gravel out of the driveway and regrade the driveway with a box blade, so I have no shortage of gravel. I would however like to keep this from happening again in the future as I have dealt with this for about the last 2 years and I am sure tired of raking gravel out of my yard.

I currently have some anti-erosion fabric staked in along the edge in order to prevent the erosion from occurring until I figure this out.

Thanks!

forcedreno2012 10-02-2013 03:09 AM

Can't answer your question but glad you are back safe and thanks for your service.

Live_Oak 10-03-2013 10:20 AM

Pics?

Was the drive properly constructed from the beginning with the topsoil removed and stone added and compacted before the final layer of gravel? Are there drainage swales to both sides of the drive to manage the water so it doesn't undermine the road base? If so, are they large enough for the volume that you're getting? Those are the usual suspects when a gravel drive is washed out.

Mills314 10-04-2013 10:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Live_Oak (Post 1249044)
Pics?

Was the drive properly constructed from the beginning with the topsoil removed and stone added and compacted before the final layer of gravel? Are there drainage swales to both sides of the drive to manage the water so it doesn't undermine the road base? If so, are they large enough for the volume that you're getting? Those are the usual suspects when a gravel drive is washed out.

Doubtful. I didn't build the house, but based on the shortcuts that I have seen..........I seriously doubt it. I will post some pics today and hopefully that will shed some more light on it. It is really only in one area that concerns me. It is rather manageable in other areas.

Pagevee 10-05-2013 07:18 AM

I don't have any suggestions but wanted to thank you for your service. I am glad you made it back safely

Mort 10-05-2013 01:38 PM

Why is everybody assuming he's in the service? Maybe he went to Afghanistan on vacation, or to visit relatives? :)

gregzoll 10-05-2013 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mort (Post 1249795)
Why is everybody assuming he's in the service? Maybe he went to Afghanistan on vacation, or to visit relatives? :)

You do not go to Afghanistan on vacation or to visit relatives. Only military service members, "Contractors", news reporters, military photographers, or the CIA staff would go to Afghanistan.

gregzoll 10-05-2013 09:53 PM

Mills314, not much you can do about migration of the gravel, unless you want to put in some type of curbing, or vertical strip, to keep it in its boundaries. You can bring in some companies that deal with this stuff, or even talk to the county road commissioner over a few beers, or while at the gun range, and see what the best option is.

If you are using recycled concrete as a base, it would interlock, but you still need some type of edging or curbing. Rain is what usually causes it to migrate to the yard, because the layer is not deep enough, so once the mud gets too wet, it just flows everywhere.

Friends of ours have a long drive from the main road, to their house, and about every two or three years, they have to bring in a large truckload of stone, which they get from the LaFarge quarry down the road from them, so they can save some money, but still they have to replace the bed every two or three years, because of it going out of the property with the vehicles, weather, etc..

Mills314 10-06-2013 12:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1249959)
Mills314, not much you can do about migration of the gravel, unless you want to put in some type of curbing, or vertical strip, to keep it in its boundaries. You can bring in some companies that deal with this stuff, or even talk to the county road commissioner over a few beers, or while at the gun range, and see what the best option is.

If you are using recycled concrete as a base, it would interlock, but you still need some type of edging or curbing. Rain is what usually causes it to migrate to the yard, because the layer is not deep enough, so once the mud gets too wet, it just flows everywhere.

Friends of ours have a long drive from the main road, to their house, and about every two or three years, they have to bring in a large truckload of stone, which they get from the LaFarge quarry down the road from them, so they can save some money, but still they have to replace the bed every two or three years, because of it going out of the property with the vehicles, weather, etc..

I really need like some edging or something like that. The reason I don't want to just replace the gravel once it flows into the yard is that my Lawnmower blades can't handle it. The amount of hills and erosion that I have on my property beats the hell out of them and I need to start getting these hills filled with thick grass and a way to keep the gravel in the actual driveway.

gregzoll 10-06-2013 03:27 PM

There is the steel edging, also the plastic, or just create a curbing with concrete, to keep it in its place. There are companies that do borders in any style, which may be the best way to go. As for the stone, I would probably go with Blue Stone, if you are wanting to clean it up and make it look better.

Go at least 12" min, to get the three layers in. Otherwise you end up right where you are now, if the gravel bed is too shallow.

From http://www.steverazzconstruction.com...vel-driveways/

"3 Different Sizes Of Gravel

You'll need several types of gravel for driveway construction that will last:

The base layer of your gravel driveway should contain fist-sized stones, also called #3 stones. #3 stones are about the size of a baseball/softball. These stones will create a solid foundation for your gravel driveway.

The second layer of your driveway should contain golf ball-sized stones, also called #57 stone.

The final layer of your gravel driveway should contain stones a bit larger than a thumbnail. You'll need "traffic bound" or "dense grade" stones (hint: we supply both). This type of gravel has stone dust mixed in and forms a hard, cement-like surface as it settles with time."

Now of course if you do not have a pad in front of your garage, or parking area, I would probably go with pavers or poured slab.

Mills314 10-06-2013 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gregzoll (Post 1250205)
There is the steel edging, also the plastic, or just create a curbing with concrete, to keep it in its place. There are companies that do borders in any style, which may be the best way to go. As for the stone, I would probably go with Blue Stone, if you are wanting to clean it up and make it look better.

Go at least 12" min, to get the three layers in. Otherwise you end up right where you are now, if the gravel bed is too shallow.

From http://www.steverazzconstruction.com...vel-driveways/

"3 Different Sizes Of Gravel

You'll need several types of gravel for driveway construction that will last:

The base layer of your gravel driveway should contain fist-sized stones, also called #3 stones. #3 stones are about the size of a baseball/softball. These stones will create a solid foundation for your gravel driveway.

The second layer of your driveway should contain golf ball-sized stones, also called #57 stone.

The final layer of your gravel driveway should contain stones a bit larger than a thumbnail. You'll need "traffic bound" or "dense grade" stones (hint: we supply both). This type of gravel has stone dust mixed in and forms a hard, cement-like surface as it settles with time."

Now of course if you do not have a pad in front of your garage, or parking area, I would probably go with pavers or poured slab.

So being that my driveway and parking area is massive.............And I have no intention of concreting the whole thing............

It looks like going with a curb might be the best option. Just have it dug up, form it and bring in a truck for a pour.

I will call some guys in the area and have them give me a price. I am assuming they will have to dig down a bit in order to keep it in place, and potentially add something to ensure the water moves away from it versus pooling up and eventually eroding under the curb.

gregzoll 10-06-2013 09:34 PM

You will still need to place the Geotex fabric down before placing the first layer of rock, so that soil does not erode. As for the curbing, if you go say 12-14" down for the footing, and do not have to worry about it heaving in Winter, it should stay for a while.

Now if you just do a decorative border instead of traditional curbing, it would just be about 6" max from top to bottom of the border against the soil.

Mills314 10-07-2013 10:31 PM

Yeah, as for the fabric.............

This is a retro project, so everything that was previously mentioned is basically impossible due to the fact that we are currently driving over 6 years of compacted gravel.


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