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Old 10-30-2012, 08:36 PM   #1
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Ginko tree


Can anyone tell me the pros and cons of a Ginko tree. i live in SE Indiana

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Old 10-30-2012, 09:47 PM   #2
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Ginko tree


Every thing about it is good except of one ting---

Nice shape--

Interesting leaves--

Disease resistant--

Long life----

But----------

The rotting fruit smells like death and will make your stomach turn---

If you can live with that small shortcoming--it's a nice tree.

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Old 10-31-2012, 03:54 AM   #3
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Ginko tree


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Originally Posted by oh'mike View Post
Every thing about it is good except of one ting---

Nice shape--

Interesting leaves--

Disease resistant--

Long life----

But----------

The rotting fruit smells like death and will make your stomach turn---

If you can live with that small shortcoming--it's a nice tree.
good one and so true
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:28 AM   #4
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Ginko tree


The Ginko tree is believed to be one of the oldest trees on the planet and has survived back to prehistoric times when we did not even walk around.

As mentioned, the fruit of female trees does fall and rot when it does it smells smell like a skunk urinated on some sort of the most rotten fruit you have ever encountered. You can rake it up but it is not a fun task.

However, only the female trees produce fruit which is why most municipalities that plant Ginkos as street trees plant the males only.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginkgo_biloba

Your real nursery or a responsible tree farm or grower should be able to sell you a nice male tree. Obviously somebody has to grow males and females or it serves the species no good. Leave that for a nursery. If the place you are buying cannot tell you the sex of the tree, I would not purchase it unless you can live with the possible fruit smell.

It is considered an endangered species so is a nice tree to plant for that reason. It does well in the landscape once established but do plant it for its ultimate size as Gingkos grow into large trees.

Last edited by user1007; 10-31-2012 at 06:36 AM.
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:33 AM   #5
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Ginko tree


I did not know they were male/female----Handsome tree----might be a good choice after all----
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Old 10-31-2012, 06:48 AM   #6
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Ginko tree


They are indeed handsome trees.

One thing to bring up if you are considering trees for your landscape. I moved back to Chicago from one of the countries oldest and most established urban forests. And I know live on Lincoln Park. Both suffered heavy losses int he form of disease and beetles because they over planted single species of trees.

The City Arborist for my last City, along with has matching City twin, put out a wonderful tree selection and planting guide to illustrate trees that wanted to see homeowners plant to improve diversity. The idea is that by having a mix of trees something like Dutch Elm Disease or a boring beetle that takes on one type will not be so devastating to the entire population.

You might see if your municipality has such a guide. Indiana University Extension may. Your library may know of such resources.

I would be surprised if male ginkoes were not on the list though.
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Old 10-31-2012, 07:05 AM   #7
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Ginko tree


Good advice-----As you know, the Emerald ash borer is wiping out entire neighbor hoods as we speak==

You would have thought that city planners would remember the Dutch Elm disease that denuded so many streets in the 1960s---by no---entire neighborhoods were planted with Ash---and now need replanting,
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Old 10-31-2012, 08:09 AM   #8
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Sometimes, and especially if your community does not have an arborist on staff, it takes a pitchfork and torch revolt of the masses to convince city tree planters they do not have to order 100 of the same tree from a nursery.

My Aunt and Uncle lived in Eau Claire for a long, long time. Half their street trees, gorgeous canopied Dutch Elms, got the disease and had to be removed. Most of the remaining ones, with too much sail surface to them, got taken out in a freak straight line wind storm.

Lincoln Park has lost a lot of nice old trees, all the same species, to a boring insect that snuck into the environment. What amazes me is there is so much for insects to do here since we have more theaters than NYC, as many rated restaurants, the lake, etc. How they got to be so boring amazes me.

Seriously, I worked for the Waste Management and Research Center which was a hybrid attached to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the University of Illinois. I got to know some of the state survey people well including those that monitor and try to treat tree diseases and insect infestations. They have certainly issued multiple warnings to municipalities like yours not to plant the same tree species. It saddens me to learn your public works folk do not listen. You must admit diversifying planting is fairly obvious common sense?
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Old 10-31-2012, 01:18 PM   #9
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Ginko tree


Growing up in NY (40 years ago) we had a ginkgo tree (a female I guess) that was positioned so that it dropped its fruit right onto the running track at our high school. Every time we ran by (through) it some of the fruit would get smashed. It was common to hear cries of "EWWW!!!" each time we came around.
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Old 10-31-2012, 05:09 PM   #10
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Ginko tree


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Originally Posted by sdsester View Post
Sometimes, and especially if your community does not have an arborist on staff, it takes a pitchfork and torch revolt of the masses to convince city tree planters they do not have to order 100 of the same tree from a nursery.

My Aunt and Uncle lived in Eau Claire for a long, long time. Half their street trees, gorgeous canopied Dutch Elms, got the disease and had to be removed. Most of the remaining ones, with too much sail surface to them, got taken out in a freak straight line wind storm.

Lincoln Park has lost a lot of nice old trees, all the same species, to a boring insect that snuck into the environment. What amazes me is there is so much for insects to do here since we have more theaters than NYC, as many rated restaurants, the lake, etc. How they got to be so boring amazes me.

Seriously, I worked for the Waste Management and Research Center which was a hybrid attached to the Illinois Department of Natural Resources and the University of Illinois. I got to know some of the state survey people well including those that monitor and try to treat tree diseases and insect infestations. They have certainly issued multiple warnings to municipalities like yours not to plant the same tree species. It saddens me to learn your public works folk do not listen. You must admit diversifying planting is fairly obvious common sense?

not to be picky but they were American elms
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Old 10-31-2012, 05:44 PM   #11
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not to be picky but they were American elms
Of course they worry. Sorry about that. Was thinking of the fungus though---Dutch Elm Disease.

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