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denemante 05-12-2011 11:42 AM

drainage ditch stagnant water
 
I've got a shallow, natural drainage ditch across my back property line. It pours into a cement culvert/drain.

I've got French drains near my house which work well to send away rainwater through those black 6-8" corregated plastic pipe. Also, my downspots go out in similar fashion. They all pour into that ditch at various places.

The ditch is probably only 12-18" deep by a few feet wide. However, in several spots, it's so filled with roots and stones that I can't dig it out to drain right - so shallow water pools - just a tiny bit. But that water STINKS! Also, it's a breeding ground for mosquitos.

Also - water must be sitting inside those corregated pipes too. When I dump out the kids play pool into the French drain, the smell it pushes out the other end is horrible. Not quite a sewage smell - but close. Must be rotting yard waste.

Anyway - I thought about laying more corregated pipe in that drainage ditch then burying it. Where applicable, where my French drains run to that ditch I'd put in another French drain to tie it to the new ditch pipe. But if it gets clogged or something breaks - my backyard will flood because even runoff from houses up the hill pour into that ditch.

Any good solutions here?

whammytap 05-16-2011 04:49 AM

Hmm. I'm not a pro, but I've got runoff problems as well. I don't think you should bury that plastic corrugated pipe--it's not very sturdy, and you're right--what do you do if it clogs? How is the grade of the ditch? Obviously, water flows downhill, so the culvert must not be "downhill" enough. Do you have a Sawz-All? Those are great for hacking away tough tree roots like the ones blocking your ditch. That'll get the ditch flowing. Start at the most downhill point--the culvert end--and work your way up to the drains.

If you still have water standing in your French drains once the ditch is draining properly, that is a bigger, tougher problem. I'm guessing that would probably mean your drains aren't pitched properly, which sounds like big money to fix that. Get that ditch flowing, and hopefully that will solve your problem. I hope this helps!

oh'mike 05-16-2011 06:17 AM

When the time comes to replace that corrugated pipe--use schedule 40 PVC drain pipe ---

The corrugated pipe traps crud in every groove--also settles and created 'bellies' that hold sludge.

You use the word 'french drain' which is a pit filled with course rock
--These are used to allow water to soak into the ground.

Do you really have a french drain?

Remember --you do not want perforated pipe---no need .

denemante 05-16-2011 10:18 AM

Yeah, I must not have a French drain. What I have are 2 boxes in the ground about 12"x"12x"12". I can see a 6 inch hole in one side which heads the direction of the pipe. I assume it's all black corregated pipe as that's what comes out into the ditch about 75 feet away.

They do flow - I can stick a hose into each and they do not overflow - water comes out the other end into the ditch - along with that horrible smell.

But water does stand in these boxes. Must be a really shallow grade to the pipe.

The previous owner got water in the walk-out basement once in 12 years during insane rain. A month later, he regraded the entire backyard and put in a large cememnt patio and these drains. We've had very heavy rains since - and the area on the patio near the house is barely wet and I see no standing water anywhere nearby.

But we've just finished the basement, so I'm trying to plan ahead.

AllanJ 05-16-2011 05:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by denemante (Post 646408)
I've got a shallow, natural drainage ditch across my back property line. It pours into a cement culvert/drain.

I've got French drains near my house which work well to send away rainwater through those black 6-8" corregated plastic pipe. Also, my downspots go out in similar fashion.

Also - water must be sitting inside those corregated pipes too. When I dump out the kids play pool into the French drain, the smell it pushes out the other end is horrible.

Anyway - I thought about laying more corregated pipe in that drainage ditch then burying it. Where applicable, where my French drains run to that ditch I'd put in another French drain to tie it to the new ditch pipe. But if it gets clogged or something breaks - my backyard will flood because even runoff from houses up the hill pour into that ditch.here?

Where do the corrugated pipes lead to?

denemante 05-16-2011 05:57 PM

The corregated pipes lead from these in-ground box drains across the backyard to the drainage ditch. Also, separate corregated pipes come off two rear downspouts and cross under the lawn to that same ditch.

AllanJ 05-17-2011 12:58 PM

Remove the stones and roots etc. from the ditch so it drains to the culvert. You may need to dredge the bottom of the ditch too (using a shovel) to get a proper pitch.

Quote:

You use the word 'french drain' which is a pit filled with course rock.
A French drain is supposed to be perforated or porous to admit and/or collect water from the surrounding soil and then carry the water someplace else. A similar or similarly constructed facility or structure where the water is supposed to soak into the ground immediately around or under it is a leach field or a dry well.


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