Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Landscaping & Lawn Care

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-10-2009, 07:46 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 23
Share |
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


One of the "fixes" I'm doing to get water away from the house is to put underground drains for my downspouts. I've dug the trenches and placed 4" corrugated pipe. I haven't filled in the trenches yet. because I was told by a friend that this type of pipe will readily clog up with debris and suggests I should use 4" smooth plastic pipe.
Am I OK with the corrugated pipe or should I replace with smooth?

deejclow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2009, 09:57 AM   #2
DIY Hack
 
Mr Chips's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 1,302
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


Obviously, smooth pipe as less chance of clogging, but if you currently don't get a lot of leaves or sticks in your gutters, then you should be o.k. You could always put some type of gutter guards, or put strainers in your downspouts to keep debris out.

if your gutters don't get clogged regularly, and you have a good bit of pitch in your underground pipe, you will probably be o.k. with the corrigated

Mr Chips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2009, 09:58 AM   #3
The DIYer Assistant
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: CO
Posts: 37
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


hey deejclow, well you right to get the corrugated pipe, but, did you also get perforated version of the black corrugated pipe? Most landscapers who work on underground drain solutions would tell you this is the best way to go because it allows water to gradually spread out as it makes it's way down and out to the area where you would like to "daylight" it, or rather have the drain end above ground. The last thing to keep in mind about these perforated corrugated pipes is you must use a "sock" as well. This material is thin and flexible and either comes in a roll separate from your pipe, or you can get the pipe already covered by it, either way it works great for keeping sediment out of your pipe while allowing water to pass through. Hope this helps!
TheDIYerGuy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2009, 11:21 AM   #4
Member
 
concretemasonry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota - Latitude 45.057 Longitude -93.074
Posts: 3,707
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


Remember if you go with perforated pipe pipe it will carry less water and more importantly, it can also collect water from the surrounding soil, which further reduces the ability to remove the water. Water will enter or go either way. That is the reason to use non-perforated pipe if you want to carry the water away from the foundation to a lower area.

I have oversize downspouts and use solid to get about 20' away and 4 feet lower before switching to perforated to distribute the water.

Dick
concretemasonry is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2009, 12:00 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 30
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


I also used solid pipe with very good pitch to drywell. Works great so far.
bobssurfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2009, 05:03 PM   #6
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 23
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


Thanks all. Advice appreciated
deejclow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2009, 08:32 AM   #7
Don't know it all, yet!
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
Posts: 910
Default

Downspout drainage pipe


Quote:
That is the reason to use non-perforated pipe if you want to carry the water away from the foundation to a lower area.
ABSOLUTELY!

Quote:
because I was told by a friend that this type of pipe will readily clog up with debris and suggests I should use 4" smooth plastic pipe.
What "debris" are they talking about? You will get a certain amount of silt in there, which is why the sock mentioned above is a very good idea. That stuff is way too cheap not to use compared to having to dig it back up a couple of years later. Or are they talking about leaves, etc from the gutters?

I would go with the smooth pipe just in case.

__________________
If it's worth doing, it's worth doing right. If you wouldn't put your name on it, it ain't done right!
downunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The IPGC Drainage Pipe agster97 Landscaping & Lawn Care 0 07-09-2009 12:05 AM
what type drainage pipe to use on a gravel way markstrt339 Building & Construction 1 11-30-2008 04:30 PM
Septic/sewer pipe replacement Mendocino Plumbing 4 11-21-2008 05:40 PM
Building a soffit around a drainage pipe along the wall ssudha17 Building & Construction 12 10-04-2008 03:18 PM
Heavy-duty roots in ground drainage pipe proofer Plumbing 11 08-06-2008 04:42 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.