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Old 08-17-2007, 11:26 AM   #1
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Dog Poop


My previous renters left their dogs' poop in my backyard. I've raked up the majority of it, but is there something like Kilz for lawns? There was so much poop that there are now bare patches in the grass. I need something that will make me more comfortable letting people (kids) use that area again without wearing a contamination suit.

Luckily, I know where the previous renters now live, so I don't have to figure out where to dispose of their crap.

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Old 08-17-2007, 12:19 PM   #2
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Dog Poop


I would think the best solution would be a non-chemical one. Rake up as much waste as you can and give the offending area a good deep watering. You could also put some powdered lime on the area to "neutralize" it. It will take a little time for the remnants to decompose (maybe a week or so) but look at the bright side... when you replant grass in that area it sure will be green!

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Luckily, I know where the previous renters now live, so I don't have to figure out where to dispose of their crap.
I hope we won't be reading about you in News of the Weird.


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Old 08-17-2007, 02:11 PM   #3
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Dog Poop


Ah, yes, I do intend to do this without chemicals. Enzymes would still be considered organic as long as the concentration was not too high, right?
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Old 08-17-2007, 02:18 PM   #4
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Dog Poop


I can't help you with enzyme treatment as I'm not familiar with it. I did have an afterthought though... you probably have a high ammonia concentration in that area and anything you can do to help abate that would be beneficial. Perhaps someone else can offer some advice in that department. If I stumble across anything I'll post it.
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Old 08-17-2007, 02:56 PM   #5
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Dog Poop


You already nailed it, Squirrel. Lime is organic and raises ph. An initial application of powdered, or better yet, spray it with the liquid version, should be a good quick fix. Then follow up later with pelletized (time release) lime. I'm close to the beach with very acidic soil and a good dose of pelletized every other year does wonders for the lawn.

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Old 08-21-2007, 11:56 AM   #6
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Dog Poop


You must have very good renters if the only problem is dog poop in the yard. This time of year it should be gone naturally in a couple weeks.
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Old 08-21-2007, 10:03 PM   #7
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Dog Poop


So I had a similar situation, we had an old fruit tree on the property and well I dug a trench around the fruit tree and filled in with the Dog Doo.... I added lots of water and its in a rainy climate. New renters & year later. Well you'd never guesss but the next renters called and told me that the apples were wonderful. I Best MACC
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Old 08-22-2007, 06:48 AM   #8
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Dog Poop


I have a similar problem...but it's with dog urine causing brown patches. I have used lime with no results but now use gypsum and it works great...
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Old 08-30-2007, 05:18 PM   #9
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Dog Poop


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. . . we had an old fruit tree on the property and well I dug a trench around the fruit tree and filled in with the Dog Doo....
That's a big No-No, MACCC. Dog poop is never supposed to be used as fertilizer.

Unless, of course, it's on sestiver's old tenants' tomato plants!!
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Old 08-31-2007, 09:01 AM   #10
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Dog Poop


^^^^ Yuck!
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Old 08-31-2007, 12:11 PM   #11
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Dog Poop


Yup, no dog poop as fertilizer. It is too salty, too much bacteria. I suppose if you composted it for a year, it would be okay...
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Old 08-31-2007, 12:55 PM   #12
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Dog Poop


I've been looking at getting one of those doggie septic systems... it's endorsed by our local municipality. They recommend to just dig a hole and build a little septic system, but I'm looking at one that's a bit more esthetically pleasing. I found one that's an insert with a lid to fit a 18 inch hole (36 inches deep). Just have to put in some septic starter and put in some with water every so often. Apparently 1 hole for 1 dog can be used for years... unless you have a st. Bernard...

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