Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Landscaping & Lawn Care

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-30-2011, 07:30 AM   #1
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Looking at doing quite a bit of work with 4x8 cement pavers this coming spring/summer. I know that I'll have to make quite a few cuts, and so I'm looking for what people here think is the best cutting tool.

So far, I've found tons of different opinions on the internet. Demo saws, wet tile saws, angle grinders, multi-tools, chop saws (!), etc.

What's your preferred tool for cutting cement pavers and reused brick? Why? Why not any of the other options?

Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2011, 07:35 AM   #2
Member
 
concretemasonry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota - Latitude 45.057 Longitude -93.074
Posts: 3,793
Rewards Points: 2,074
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


For patios, they also make a hand splitter that is used by many contractors. It is much easier and faster. Usually, there is no need to have a perfectly smooth face since the cut face can be installed facing the edging and still maintain the tight joint between adjacent pavers. Some paver suppliers even rent them out.

Dick


Last edited by concretemasonry; 08-30-2011 at 07:38 AM.
concretemasonry is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2011, 08:54 AM   #3
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


I had read about those. A tile setter I used to work for told me they were garbage, but I've never seen one in action. I'm sure ceramic tile and concrete pavers are two entirely different worlds of cutting, though.

How about splitting and then an abrasive or cutoff wheel to smooth the edge slightly? Or, scoring with a cutoff wheel, then splitting?
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 07:42 AM   #4
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,737
Rewards Points: 2,026
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


We have a hand splitter/guolotine? and it works fine on small aggregate pavers. Clay pavers can be hit or miss though. If you need a clean cut, then a cut-off saw or chop saw are the way to go.

If you have a curving edge, you can place all the brick & let them run "wild", mark your curving line, and cut the entire edge at once, with the brick in place, with a cut-off saw. Quick accurate way to do it.

If you need to cut one brick at a time, I don't think you can beat a $150-200 electric chop saw with a $100 14" diamond blade.
jomama45 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 08-31-2011, 01:50 PM   #5
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


I imagine you would consider a 4x8x1.75 concrete paver to be "small" and "aggregate", right? That's what I'll probably be cutting. And some reclaimed brick.

Can a the guilotine only cut on 90 degree angles, or do 45's as well? Does it really cut any better than a mason's chisel for these materials?
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 06:57 AM   #6
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,737
Rewards Points: 2,026
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thadius856 View Post
I imagine you would consider a 4x8x1.75 concrete paver to be "small" and "aggregate", right? That's what I'll probably be cutting. And some reclaimed brick.

Yes, they're small enough to fit into it.


Can a the guilotine only cut on 90 degree angles, or do 45's as well? Does it really cut any better than a mason's chisel for these materials?
45 degree angles won't be easy, as it's fixed and doesn't angle at all, so I don't think the blades/chisels are deep enough to break at a true 45 degrees.

I'm a mason whose had plenty time on a hammer & chisel and I'd honestly trust my splitter before myself anyday.

I still think you may want to look at a cheap metal chopsaw though with a diamond blade, because the splitters aren't cheap either.
jomama45 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 12:14 PM   #7
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Hmmmm.

If I were to lay a 45 herringbone, I'd need quite a few 45 degree cuts. Plus other funky angles where it will meet the curved soldier course.

Chop saw looks better every day.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 12:48 PM   #8
Member
 
concretemasonry's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota - Latitude 45.057 Longitude -93.074
Posts: 3,793
Rewards Points: 2,074
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


The question is whether you need the accuracy to go to a saw, especially when you have some "free-form" edges and 45's. Pavers have been installed for decades/centuries without saws and have performed well. Unforunately on a patio, you are too close the work and anticipated final appearance. When you apply and vibrate the sand for the interlock it fills every space between the pavers and between the pavers and the edge restraint.

I do question the size of the pavers, because the 1 1/2" thickness is really skimpy and non-standard, even for a patio. Normally a 60 mm (about 2-3/8") is used for light loads. An 80 mm paver (about 3-1/8") is used for driveways and some streets, while 100 mm pavers (about 3-7/8") are used for airports and industrial facilities. Thickness is critical because a thinner paver does not interlock as well and distribute pedestrian and traffic loads as well as a thicker paver. All real pavers are well over 8000 psi and the casual pavers and stepping stones are about 1 5/8", but have no strength requirements.

If you already have the pavers, make sure the base is compacted very well and the filling fine sand is vibrated well into the joints while you even out the surface.

If you are laying over a concrete slab, it is a totally different situation, similar to what a tile setter would do and pray for durability.

Dick
concretemasonry is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 01:03 PM   #9
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


While I have concrete slab, it will be removed in phases as I work with the pavers. I do plan on a compacted base, 4" aggregate and 1" sand. This project won't start until the coming spring.

Double checked the paver stats. A bit confused. Manufacturer shows 2-3/8". Lowe's shows 1-7/8". I've seen them in person, but don't recall their thickness. I wonder if they're a thinner custom product just for Lowe's to save $$. Either way, I'd planned on going with a dedicated masonry local distributor if possible. Our second choice shows at 9x6x2-3/8 as well.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 06:29 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 66
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


I used a diamond blade on my circular saw and one on my angle grinder. By the time I was done I wish I rented a wet saw.
Attached Images
 
Jj375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 06:34 PM   #11
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


That's a pretty nice patio. What's under the cover? :D

Looks like 6x6 and 6x9 cobble. Do you remember the manufacturer / model? If you don't mind me asking, how much did you pay per sq for just the pavers alone?

To be clear... you said you used a circular saw. Like.. this kind of circular saw?!?!

Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 06:36 PM   #12
Concrete & Masonry
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 2,737
Rewards Points: 2,026
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thadius856 View Post
While I have concrete slab, it will be removed in phases as I work with the pavers. I do plan on a compacted base, 4" aggregate and 1" sand. This project won't start until the coming spring.

Double checked the paver stats. A bit confused. Manufacturer shows 2-3/8". Lowe's shows 1-7/8". I've seen them in person, but don't recall their thickness. I wonder if they're a thinner custom product just for Lowe's to save $$. Either way, I'd planned on going with a dedicated masonry local distributor if possible. Our second choice shows at 9x6x2-3/8 as well.

Excellent idea!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jj375 View Post
I used a diamond blade on my circular saw and one on my angle grinder. By the time I was done I wish I rented a wet saw.
Nice work, and good thought on the wet saw. The Herringbone pattern on a 45 degree the OP's considering is even far more cuts than what you had to do in the picture.
jomama45 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 06:41 PM   #13
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Quote:
Originally Posted by jomama45 View Post
The Herringbone pattern on a 45 degree the OP's considering is even far more cuts than what you had to do in the picture.
I just might have to ditch that crazy idea in the end. Everything I want to build against is a straight line and built on (hopefully exactly) square. The house is a straight rectangle, as well as the property line, both front and back yards and all the fencing.

The reason I was considering it was because I'm afraid the waviness caused by numerous layers of stucco and paint will be more obvious if the eye catches the straight line from a soldier course and herringbone running right against the house.
Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2011, 09:23 PM   #14
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 66
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Quote:
Originally Posted by Thadius856
That's a pretty nice patio. What's under the cover? :D

Looks like 6x6 and 6x9 cobble. Do you remember the manufacturer / model? If you don't mind me asking, how much did you pay per sq for just the pavers alone?

To be clear... you said you used a circular saw. Like.. this kind of circular saw?!?!
Yeah a circular saw it worked but what a mess. The pavers are Hanover pavers 6•6,6•9. I think about 3$ a square foot. And it's a fire pit under the cover lol.
Jj375 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2011, 02:49 AM   #15
Member
 
Thadius856's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Northern California
Posts: 921
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Cutting Cement Pavers and Brick


Looked up the Hanover pavers. Found a price list for a MA distributor that shows $2.35/sqft on the first try. Needless to say, I'm jealous. The closest I have come so far is $2.85/sqft. It appears that they're not produced in this region though. :\ Oh well, a classic paver is a classic paver.

I inquired about the spec on Lowe's site for the Oldcastle being listed at 1-7/8". This is the response I got.

Quote:
Sorry for the mix up!
Yes the paver for Lowe's is thinner and ICPI ( the governing body for paver installation ) typically recommends a 60mm paver unless it's an overlay ( going over a concrete foundation / base) We do have a 50mm paver however that is used for pedestrian only applications.

Please let me know if you don't receive your catalog in a timely fashion, I will be happy to personally get one to you.

Have a great evening.

Matthew Doss
BELGARD
Seems like that pretty rules Lowe's out for me. I knew there was no way they could come in at $1.85/sqft for the same paver I was seeing at dedicated local distributors for 50% more.

I do have plenty of concrete I could lay them over, but it's even to grade. I'd either have to create a 1-7/8" right at my back door (LOL) or grind it down that far (LMAO).

Thadius856 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
ceramic tile dust on brick patio pavers Paml Tiling, ceramics, marble 1 07-21-2011 06:15 PM
Brick pavers In Michigan klrz28 Landscaping & Lawn Care 1 03-31-2011 04:00 PM
Brick Pavers joe3534 Building & Construction 0 12-09-2009 04:11 PM
Damaged brick pavers turbomangt Landscaping & Lawn Care 1 12-02-2009 12:41 AM
Brick pavers on driveway ???? sflamedic General DIY Discussions 2 04-21-2008 11:12 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.