Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Landscaping & Lawn Care

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-10-2010, 09:55 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 96
Share |
Default

Colloidal Clay


A customer of mine wants me to add colloidal clay around her foundation.
A local architect recommended it for drainage, then add dirt and top it off with sod.

Has anyone use this clay and what other terms are used to identify it and place and order?

No landscapers seem to know what I'm looking for.

Thanks, I'm getting desperate.....

RemodelMan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-11-2010, 08:33 AM   #2
DIY Hack
 
Mr Chips's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 1,302
Default

Colloidal Clay


i think what you are looking for is commonly reffered to as "select fill". It's fill dirt with a percentage of clay and is very compactable, often used around foundations

__________________
Those who can, do...
Those who can't criticize on the internet
Mr Chips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2010, 07:36 PM   #3
Don't know it all, yet!
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Metro Atlanta, GA
Posts: 910
Default

Colloidal Clay


You can't ask the architect?
__________________
If it's worth doing, it's worth doing right. If you wouldn't put your name on it, it ain't done right!
downunder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2010, 03:57 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: metro
Posts: 1,039
Default

Colloidal Clay


my first noob question: where can you buy this stuff in small amounts at a time?
federer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2010, 05:45 PM   #5
DIY Hack
 
Mr Chips's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 1,302
Default

Colloidal Clay


Quote:
Originally Posted by federer View Post
my first noob question: where can you buy this stuff in small amounts at a time?
You would buy it at a place that sells fill. Not sure what you mean by small amounts, but I imagine most of those places would sell you a bucketful if you are willing to pay cash!!
__________________
Those who can, do...
Those who can't criticize on the internet
Mr Chips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2010, 07:25 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: metro
Posts: 1,039
Default

Colloidal Clay


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Chips View Post
You would buy it at a place that sells fill. Not sure what you mean by small amounts, but I imagine most of those places would sell you a bucketful if you are willing to pay cash!!
thanks for the reply. i need to try google a fill place then. thanks. i was thinking a couple 50lb bags to do one side of the house.
federer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2010, 12:41 AM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: metro
Posts: 1,039
Default

Colloidal Clay


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr Chips View Post
You would buy it at a place that sells fill. Not sure what you mean by small amounts, but I imagine most of those places would sell you a bucketful if you are willing to pay cash!!
coming back to this-can you just dump the clay select fill on top of existing soil?
federer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2010, 06:12 AM   #8
DIY Hack
 
Mr Chips's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 1,302
Default

Colloidal Clay


yes, just make sure you backslope so water drains away from foundation
__________________
Those who can, do...
Those who can't criticize on the internet
Mr Chips is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2010, 07:07 AM   #9
Member
 
steveel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 287
Default

Colloidal Clay


It depends. The lowest the wood of your wall can come to the soil is.... well, I forget. Is it 6" or 8"? More is better, anyway. If you're already at that level, I wouldn't just add more without a professionals (architect/engineer) approval, and checking with your building dept.
steveel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2010, 07:36 AM   #10
Civil Engineer
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,166
Default

Colloidal Clay


A colloid is a suspension. You can look up the exact definition of a colloid on Wikipedia. Clay is a family of minerals, consisting of several hundred different types. A colloidal clay is a clay which remains in suspension when agitated in water. This means that the clay is in the form of very fine particles which do not settle out of the water column.

A typical colloidal clay is bentonite, so named because it was originally mined in Benton Wyoming. It is essentially impervious, hence is used in waterproofing panels. It also holds water very well, but does not release it easily. Bentonite is used in kitty litter, well drilling fluid, waterproofing membranes, landfill covers, and many other applications, and can be purchased by the 50 lb bag at specialty stores that cater to drillers, or you can buy clay based kitty litter and take your chances on what you get.

Now as to why anyone would want to add such a product around their house, I have no idea. If added in sufficient quantity, it will make the soil effectively impervious, so water will run off rather than percolating downward. So far as I know, it will not improve the soil characteristics for growing plants. I have never seen it used for the purpose you suggest, but if the customer is convinced that they want it, well at least now you know what it is and where to get it.
Daniel Holzman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2010, 01:31 AM   #11
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: metro
Posts: 1,039
Question

Colloidal Clay


Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Holzman View Post
A colloid is a suspension. You can look up the exact definition of a colloid on Wikipedia. Clay is a family of minerals, consisting of several hundred different types. A colloidal clay is a clay which remains in suspension when agitated in water. This means that the clay is in the form of very fine particles which do not settle out of the water column.

A typical colloidal clay is bentonite, so named because it was originally mined in Benton Wyoming. It is essentially impervious, hence is used in waterproofing panels. It also holds water very well, but does not release it easily. Bentonite is used in kitty litter, well drilling fluid, waterproofing membranes, landfill covers, and many other applications, and can be purchased by the 50 lb bag at specialty stores that cater to drillers, or you can buy clay based kitty litter and take your chances on what you get.

Now as to why anyone would want to add such a product around their house, I have no idea. If added in sufficient quantity, it will make the soil effectively impervious, so water will run off rather than percolating downward. So far as I know, it will not improve the soil characteristics for growing plants. I have never seen it used for the purpose you suggest, but if the customer is convinced that they want it, well at least now you know what it is and where to get it.
thats for the info. the purpose is for regrading-draining water away from the foundation. you dont think this collodial clay is a suitable material to accomplish this? not sure what you are getting at exactly. sorry i am slow and this is all new to me

federer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
colloidal clay in well water BobMac Plumbing 43 01-14-2013 08:11 PM
clay cap around foundation? patrickosu Building & Construction 5 08-21-2010 04:55 AM
Clay Soil Vs. Grass mahjohn Landscaping & Lawn Care 6 08-20-2010 07:43 PM
Removing clay stains from asphalt ljcox General DIY Discussions 6 05-15-2009 08:54 PM
Improving Drainage in Clay Soil BigJimmy Landscaping & Lawn Care 1 03-23-2007 12:03 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.