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-   -   Can I prevent bamboo from overtaking my backyard? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f16/can-i-prevent-bamboo-overtaking-my-backyard-178097/)

ilyaz 04-25-2013 05:53 PM

Can I prevent bamboo from overtaking my backyard?
 
1 Attachment(s)
We've lived in our house for about 13 years now and when we moved in, we already had bamboo growing in the far back corner of our yard. Over the years we have not done much to it except for stomping fresh shoots every spring.

Not sure if it's too late already, but I am trying to figure out if I can control its growth and prevent it from taking over my yard completely. I am also looking for solutions that will not force to sell my house to be able to afford them. :-)

The photo shows most of my backyard. This spring I am seeing fresh shoots coming out of the ground near the shed.

In front and to the left is a patio The patio is linked to a long driveway beside our house (You can't really see them). I am seeing shoots along the driveway essentially on the other side of the house!

Ideally, I don't want to get rid of bamboo completely. Not sure if that's even possible given that it grows on our neighbors' properties too. I think I want to restrict it to the far left "epicenter" corner by putting up some type of barrier around it. Can I get rid of the rest (at least closer to the shed) by digging up the yard and removing all roots? How deep would I have to dig? What sort of barrier should I use? Thx

SPS-1 04-25-2013 07:24 PM

Do a search for "bamboo". You will find some interesting stories.

SeniorSitizen 04-25-2013 07:51 PM

Hogs will rid your yard of bamboo but your yard will have holes rooted about 2 ft. deep or however the deepest rhizome is.

I'd prefer to try an application of glyphosate applied in a manner that saturates both sides of the new growth leaf. I've never tried it on bamboo but I've killed un-wanted trees 10 ft. tall with a 4" dia. trunk.

The problem with the glyphosate is people think they are still on the freeway and everything is fast and immediate. Glyphosate just doesn't work that way.

InspectorZo 04-25-2013 09:21 PM

I've always recommended installing bamboo in pots in a back yard. It is a plant on steroids. I know of homeowners that dug up the yard to completely rid themselves of the bamboo plants and 6 months later, they sprouted back.
You can try and install a root barrier such as this one to control the spread of the bamboo.
That is all the info I can offer, sorry!

InspectorZo

Quote:

Originally Posted by ilyaz (Post 1167196)
We've lived in our house for about 13 years now and when we moved in, we already had bamboo growing in the far back corner of our yard. Over the years we have not done much to it except for stomping fresh shoots every spring.

Not sure if it's too late already, but I am trying to figure out if I can control its growth and prevent it from taking over my yard completely. I am also looking for solutions that will not force to sell my house to be able to afford them. :-)

The photo shows most of my backyard. This spring I am seeing fresh shoots coming out of the ground near the shed.

In front and to the left is a patio The patio is linked to a long driveway beside our house (You can't really see them). I am seeing shoots along the driveway essentially on the other side of the house!

Ideally, I don't want to get rid of bamboo completely. Not sure if that's even possible given that it grows on our neighbors' properties too. I think I want to restrict it to the far left "epicenter" corner by putting up some type of barrier around it. Can I get rid of the rest (at least closer to the shed) by digging up the yard and removing all roots? How deep would I have to dig? What sort of barrier should I use? Thx


ilyaz 04-25-2013 11:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fairview (Post 1167271)
I'd prefer to try an application of glyphosate applied in a manner that saturates both sides of the new growth leaf. I've never tried it on bamboo but I've killed un-wanted trees 10 ft. tall with a 4" dia. trunk.

Is glyphosate the stuff they put into RoundUp. That stuff is powerful but I am afraid of killing everything else around the bamboo. Anyway, food for thought I guess. Thx

ddawg16 04-26-2013 12:41 AM

Let it keep growing....pretty soon you will have enough to put new floors in your house.....another week or two should do it.....

SeniorSitizen 04-26-2013 01:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ilyaz (Post 1167385)
Is glyphosate the stuff they put into RoundUp. That stuff is powerful but I am afraid of killing everything else around the bamboo. Anyway, food for thought I guess. Thx

Yes, and no that won't happen. I've used glyphosate in flower beds where an unwanted grass was in such close proximity to desired plants the two had to be tied off separately as not to touch. I've also planted garden in an area 10 days after spraying with no ill effects from the glyphosate but the deer and grass hoppers devastated it later.

Seattle2k 04-26-2013 03:55 AM

Glyphosate can also be applied with a small paint brush.

ilyaz 04-26-2013 07:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fairview (Post 1167450)
Yes, and no that won't happen. I've used glyphosate in flower beds where an unwanted grass was in such close proximity to desired plants the two had to be tied off separately as not to touch. I've also planted garden in an area 10 days after spraying with no ill effects from the glyphosate but the deer and grass hoppers devastated it later.

So would I apply it to fresh shoots? Exposed/dug up rhizomes? Leaves of adult "trunks"? If I cut a trunk and apply this stuff to the stump, will this help kill the roots? Thx

SeniorSitizen 04-26-2013 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ilyaz (Post 1167502)
So would I apply it to fresh shoots? Thx

Yes, it's been determined new growth is more susceptible to treatment than older growth, but that has never prevented me from applying to older growth if I missed it when it was a younger plant.

There is possibly a new product I'm not aware of but the original Glyphosate wasn't designed to be applied to cut woody stems, tree trunks etc.

If the new plants are such that they can be wicked by pinching and dragging with sponges rather than spraying, a quart of concentrate mixed according to directions will treat probably 10 times more plants than spraying and get better coverage.

Wicking is just an example but you can use your imagination on your favorite application method. Brushes, paint rollers, spraying etc. all work but some methods are just better than others for a specific application. Follow label directions and don't let anyone convince you to mix in other ingredients that aren't on the label. Example: Diesel fuel.

user1007 04-26-2013 09:33 AM

Bamboo gets a bad rap and can be a magical addition to the home landscape. It is important to know what type you are planting and what to expect from it though. Some varieties can take over quickly if you turn your back on them. And as with anything non-native they have nothing natural to eat them (although introducing hogs or wild boar to your backyard could be fun!).

There are two types of bamboo that can be sloppy lumped into either running or clumping type. Aggressive bamboo of the running type sends out rhyzomes horizontally that then take root inches/feet from the parent plant. These rooted rhyzomes quickly become a new plant sending out its own rhyzomes. Like bermuda grass or spider plants (fun for houseplants and a dreaded weed by Hawaiian pineapple growers).

Especially when I specified the running type of bamboo in landscapes I specified dwarf varieties that were slower growing to start and than had it planted inside of rings cut from large PVC or concrete drain pipe buried in the ground---it will bust clay pots. This generally worked well to keep it contained to what the landscape design called for.

The clumping types can be contained in similar manner but they spread more slowing and a root system forms new roots for a separate plant. In the wild, animals running through the bamboo would pull the clumps apart and establish a new plant, etc. You have to go in and thin clumping types manually to make them look their best. A pygmie form of black bamboo looked great in the landscape, for example, but had to be thinned out every 3-5 years.

If you want some bamboo to remain your best bet is to determine what type you have. Dig out what you do not want at this point and then bury some sort of retaining structure to contain what you have to where you want it.

Chemical treatment seems an endless task and do be careful introducing herbicides.

Too bad Chinese Panda Bears do not make good pets or adapt to most climates well.

Seattle2k 04-26-2013 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fairview (Post 1167514)
There is possibly a new product I'm not aware of but the original Glyphosate wasn't designed to be applied to cut woody stems, tree trunks etc.

You might be thinking of Dicamba. Here's a reference from University of Rhode Island http://www.uri.edu/ce/factsheets/pri...mbooprint.html


And Washington State Univ has a paper on using Glyphosate for Bamboo eradication. http://county.wsu.edu/king/gardening...radication.pdf


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