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hidden 1 11-15-2011 08:05 PM

brick edging
 
Hi i am wanting to make a edger outside of patio using 2ft long by 4 inch wide 5 inches high decorative block(rectangular)..side by side 1 layer.

What will i need to do to install securely and have a uniform look.Its not against any thing just in ground.

Will i need leveling sand,gravel,cement,etc?..

hidden 1 11-20-2011 07:02 PM

pic
 
1 Attachment(s)
here is a pic at what im doing.
any suggestions?2011-11-14 08.14.47.jpg

user1007 11-23-2011 05:32 PM

No matter what you do, that thin wall is going to look wobbly and warped in short order. No way you are going to keep it plumb and upright and the pieces integrated to each other. I guess you could try setting it in concrete but I would worry you will break the things if they cannot flex.

concretemasonry 11-23-2011 07:13 PM

I am lost in the lack of description and the application. For edging a patio with pavers, just a 1 5/8" thick concrete unit is considered overkill.

If you are trying to build a low retaining wall, there are cheaper and better ways to do it.

Dick

hidden 1 12-01-2011 08:23 PM

Its not connecting to a walkway or stone,etc, is at edge of flower bed . Only clay dirt around it.
Probably will lay gravel and leveling sand then seat well with mallet and level. Blocks are 2 ft long and have a wavy slant at top 4 inches wide 5 inch high
(got a steal of deal so this is nothing as to expense)..
Just wasnt sure what to use in between and under em for a good strong bond.

joecaption 12-01-2011 09:00 PM

Unless you pore some form of footer wider then the blocks and get that level, then set the blocked in morter then back fil lon the sides with something like crush and run that gets compacted. There just going to tip when something like the lawn mower or some one triping over them come up againt them. Just setting them in sand will never stay level once the season change or even a hard rain.
Anything you use to try and bond them together is just going to crack because there's nothing to stop that long piece from sinking or lifting.

user1007 12-01-2011 09:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by joecaption (Post 783676)
Unless you pore some form of footer wider then the blocks and get that level, then set the blocked in morter then back fil lon the sides with something like crush and run that gets compacted. There just going to tip when something like the lawn mower or some one triping over them come up againt them. Just setting them in sand will never stay level once the season change or even a hard rain.
Anything you use to try and bond them together is just going to crack because there's nothing to stop that long piece from sinking or lifting.

EXACTLY! :thumbsup: Do you want to keep arguing how your system should work or listen to people who know how it will not? :furious::furious::furious: You have live forces coming at this thin tiled retainer wall you have in mind even as you think about it. You cannot match them with a dead load source, planted in soil as a base anchor like concrete or rock. The base will not flex or move at the same rate.

I am sure the tiles are beautiful but use them for something else. Or hire an orthodontist to line up the teeth, perfectly straight now but wacked in no more than a year is my prediction the way you are approaching this.

pls8xx 12-01-2011 11:21 PM

If I read everyone correctly, the consensus is that the blocks will become out of align in short order. But that might not be the case. If this is a warm climate area, there is no expansive clay subsoil, and the blocks are buried in the ground with only the top inch exposed, I think the alignment could last for many years.

Even where conditions dictate that the blocks will have movement and a above ground look is desired, there are still ways to use the blocks.

One such way to make the project work would be to pour collars 12 inches square, 4 inches thick, with a hole in the center slightly larger than the end of the blocks. The project is then assembled with each block end inserted half way into a collar. The whole line can then flex with the soil movement and the collars hold the alignment and keep the blocks upright.

user1007 12-02-2011 02:26 AM

The OP did not want advice. He wanted affirmation.

He is going to build his magic wall of perfectly straight teeth regardless of comments made by any of us.

He knows. Get out of his way.

pls8xx 12-02-2011 05:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sdsester (Post 783781)
The OP did not want advice. He wanted affirmation.

He is going to build his magic wall of perfectly straight teeth regardless of comments made by any of us.

He knows. Get out of his way.

The same is probably true for about 9 out of 10 that come to this forum. And for that reason I never feel guilty if I don't take the time to reply to a question. The ones that really benefit are those that read the forum, learning the solution before they have the problem.

In this case the OP does not appear to have much at risk in giving his method a try; if he doesn't like the result he can remove the blocks in an hour. But if the blocks are placed with the bottom near ground level, they will be a hazard. It's very possible that someone could step on the unsecured blocks and take a fall and sustain major injuries. For that reason, it seemed worth my time to offer a solution.

hidden1 12-04-2011 08:16 PM

lol
 
lol im.just setting 20 of in the ground side by side 3/4 of each one will be inground.(and no--theres no one to worry about trippin on-and - is way out of the way too..).and weather is usually above freezing.

.its not bricksurgery geeese..

and if it doesnt turn out right right ill try a concrete edge with peagravel...not a biggie project..
:whistling2:


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