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Old 09-09-2011, 08:48 AM   #1
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Window trim


I have a 1959-built ranch home with odd-sized windows trimmed out with the original rounded 2" trim. I painted all if it white, but it still does not look that great.

I was in a friends house and his house is trimmed out with 3" trim on the windows and 4" on the baseboards. I like it, but I am also considering removing all of the trim and just finishing it with sheetrock.

Thoughts?

Thank you

Graham

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Old 09-09-2011, 08:55 AM   #2
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How about some photos?

DM

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Old 09-09-2011, 08:59 AM   #3
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Window trim


I will take some and post. My digital camera was stolen so I will have to take with my phone so they may not be the best.
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Old 09-09-2011, 08:59 AM   #4
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Not sure how you would finish a window trim off with sheet rock thats would be a new one to me.

You could do 3" wood, either stainable (my preference) or paintable, but you have to be aware that to do trim work you need the proper equipment, at a minimum a good saw.

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Old 09-09-2011, 09:03 AM   #5
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You will add a lot of value and enjoyment to your home with upgraded trims and perhaps new interior doors.

Post pictures of the ranch moldings you have now---Original house might be plaster---Skim coating might take car of the old surface.
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Old 09-09-2011, 09:04 AM   #6
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Window trim


Mark,

I have access to any equipment I need as a buddy of mine is a remodeling contractor.

From what I can remember, some of the newer homes I have seen did not have window trim inside. I could be dreaming something up though...
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Old 09-09-2011, 09:04 AM   #7
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There are all kinds of ways to trim windows and what might look great in one house will look out of place in another.

If you Google "window trim" and look at the images you’ll get endless ideas. If you see something you like you can post it here and we can help you make your window look like the one you chose.
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Old 09-09-2011, 09:08 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gjones View Post
Mark,

From what I can remember, some of the newer homes I have seen did not have window trim inside. I could be dreaming something up though...
No I have seen windows dressed without the use of casing, but, the wall openning was built with that consideration, as your windows already have casings, it would be more pratical to just replace those.

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Old 09-09-2011, 09:12 AM   #9
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Mark,

That may be what I saw. I may just have to stick with some sort of trim and redo the casings later.
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Old 09-09-2011, 09:47 AM   #10
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I've seen metal bead edges on windows as well as curved.
Not my preference though. I like hardwood trim.

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Old 09-09-2011, 10:12 AM   #11
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I've seen it done without any trim. Something like this:


IMO, it's quite a risk since drywall is so susceptible to water. I'd imagine that this setup would also be prone to cracking...
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:32 PM   #12
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I have an 80's contemporary home & just had all the window & door trim & baseboards removed! Some I had a plasterer "wrap" with plaster & painted to match the walls (so the paint goes from the walls to the inside of the window sills, leaving just the window trim wood.) This was super expensive.
On other windows & doors I plastered in the gap between the wooden door & window jam (plaster NOT joint compound-too soft) then used a 3/4" x 3/8" wood trim piece to go over the crack. It needs to be covered because as your house heats & cools the walls do shift slightly. I painted the trim to match the walls leaving only the insides if the windows wood (but you could stain the wood too, to match your style). The look is very rich & custom. It's also super easy to cut & install. It will take longer than the old fashioned trim option but it's a trade with expense...sometimes time is money!
Best of luck.
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Old 10-06-2011, 04:34 PM   #13
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I'll post a photo if you are interested...let me know.
:-)
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Old 10-06-2011, 05:59 PM   #14
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I would love to see a few pictures. Thanks!!
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Old 10-07-2011, 09:55 AM   #15
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Here is a photo of the plaster wrapped windows, skylights and doors... this cost a small fortune, but totally worth it for the 'high traffic' rooms...
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