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-   -   What Comes First-Drywall or Backerboard?? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/what-comes-first-drywall-backerboard-2101/)

allen1466 03-23-2006 05:55 AM

What Comes First-Drywall or Backerboard??
 
Hello Everyone,

Remodeling my half bathroom and I have been asking a question:

Does the drywall go up first, then the cement backerboard or is it visa verse?? I will be laying 6" x 6" tiles.

Also, for the 6" x 6" tiles, should I use 1/4" backerboard or 1/2"?? I have
1 1/4" thick subfloor w/o the backerboard.

Thanks, Allen

redline 03-23-2006 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by allen1466
Hello Everyone,

Remodeling my half bathroom and I have been asking a question:

Does the drywall go up first, then the cement backerboard or is it visa verse?? I will be laying 6" x 6" tiles.

Also, for the 6" x 6" tiles, should I use 1/4" backerboard or 1/2"?? I have
1 1/4" thick subfloor w/o the backerboard.

Thanks, Allen

Are these tiles going on the floor or on the wall?

KUIPORNG 03-23-2006 07:44 AM

In addition to this question
 
This question also apply to the project I am doing. I would like to ask even further, should the floor tiles being laid before the drywalling? I saw new home building like this, laying floor tiles before drywalling... but want to know if this is the right way of doing things. I can see advantageous of this as your tile edges will all nicely concive under the dry walls even without trims...

allen1466 03-23-2006 08:10 AM

Hello Everyone,

I will be putting the tiles on the floor only. I would like to put the tiles down last so I won't damage the tiles. This is what I have been told.

What I have right now is this: exposed stud work and the new sub-floor. People have told me to put the backerboard down first and then drywall. Leave a 1/2"-3/4" gap between the drywall and the backerboard. This way if water does get on the floor and it seeps into the wall, it won't get the drywall wet. But this bath is only a 1/2 bath.

The tiles I have are 1/4" thick and the thinset should be 1/4" under the tiles. The floor trim should cover the gaps.

Allen

Darylh 03-23-2006 09:18 AM

1-1/4" plywood subfloor "wow". you got some floor there already so 1/4" will do fine but use lots of fasteners. 1/2" is more stable and deflexs less. You can go either way as far as when you put the backer board in but I would put it in first and do the intire floor even where the cabinets go..Make sure when you grout the tiles you grout into the wall and use some clear caulking after you put in the baseboard trim.

KUIPORNG 03-23-2006 10:05 AM

What is the best way to fastening?
 
Hi there,

Don't want to HJ this thread, but jus really need to ask the question more as I am doing similar stuff for my basement bathroom. I am using the regular ply wood subflooring on top of a thick plastic sheet which on top of a concrete floor... the ply wood is kind of make it the same with everywhere else in the basement: wood flooring. now the question comes? how to do the fastening of the backboard to the plywood subflooring? as my ply wood is not that thick, may be 1/4" to 1/2", I was thinking using concrete screw, but then you are talking about a lot of fastening, should I used concrete screw plus Adhesive?

thank you

redline 03-23-2006 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by allen1466
Hello Everyone,

I will be putting the tiles on the floor only. I would like to put the tiles down last so I won't damage the tiles. This is what I have been told.

What I have right now is this: exposed stud work and the new sub-floor. People have told me to put the backerboard down first and then drywall. Leave a 1/2"-3/4" gap between the drywall and the backerboard. This way if water does get on the floor and it seeps into the wall, it won't get the drywall wet. But this bath is only a 1/2 bath.

The tiles I have are 1/4" thick and the thinset should be 1/4" under the tiles. The floor trim should cover the gaps.

Allen

If the tiles will be going on the floor then drywall is not used on the floor only on the walls.

Backerboard (or cement board) should go down before the tiles.

If you do plan on using tiles on the walls then you will also use the cement board (backerboard) on the walls behind the tile and the drywall is not needed. The cement board is used in place of the drywall.

The cement board is used in areas that water may pentrate a tile.

Hope this helps.

bob the builder 03-23-2006 06:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by allen1466
Hello Everyone,

I will be putting the tiles on the floor only. I would like to put the tiles down last so I won't damage the tiles. This is what I have been told.

What I have right now is this: exposed stud work and the new sub-floor. People have told me to put the backerboard down first and then drywall. Leave a 1/2"-3/4" gap between the drywall and the backerboard. This way if water does get on the floor and it seeps into the wall, it won't get the drywall wet. But this bath is only a 1/2 bath.

The tiles I have are 1/4" thick and the thinset should be 1/4" under the tiles. The floor trim should cover the gaps.

Allen

I would say if you plan on dropping a bit of mud on the floor when finishing would you sooner clean it off of the backerboard or subfloor, unless you lay down some protective covering. I've seen it done both ways. Flooring guy comes last and he is the one who installs the backerboard usually so I would say that is last...

Bob

bob the builder 03-23-2006 06:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G
Hi there,

Don't want to HJ this thread, but jus really need to ask the question more as I am doing similar stuff for my basement bathroom. I am using the regular ply wood subflooring on top of a thick plastic sheet which on top of a concrete floor... the ply wood is kind of make it the same with everywhere else in the basement: wood flooring. now the question comes? how to do the fastening of the backboard to the plywood subflooring? as my ply wood is not that thick, may be 1/4" to 1/2", I was thinking using concrete screw, but then you are talking about a lot of fastening, should I used concrete screw plus Adhesive?

thank you

How thick is your plywood 1/2" or 1/4"???

Bob

KUIPORNG 03-24-2006 01:08 PM

reply to Bob the builder
 
the thickness of my plywood is the same os those $11 Canadian Dollars 4x8 OSB board bought from HD, as I used mostly OSB everywhere except the bathroom as I want better quality there knowing that I am going to lay tiles. I really don't know the thickness right now, if above information does not let you know, I will have come back on Monday telling you...

bob the builder 03-24-2006 06:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G
the thickness of my plywood is the same os those $11 Canadian Dollars 4x8 OSB board bought from HD, as I used mostly OSB everywhere except the bathroom as I want better quality there knowing that I am going to lay tiles. I really don't know the thickness right now, if above information does not let you know, I will have come back on Monday telling you...

The reason is because if it is 1/4" it will be tough to recess your screws. I would glue it and screw it. Flat head tapcon I guess. Or add another layer of ply.......

Bob

R&D Tile 03-26-2006 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Darylh
1-1/4" plywood subfloor "wow". you got some floor there already so 1/4" will do fine but use lots of fasteners. 1/2" is more stable and deflexs less. You can go either way as far as when you put the backer board in but I would put it in first and do the intire floor even where the cabinets go..Make sure when you grout the tiles you grout into the wall and use some clear caulking after you put in the baseboard trim.

You DO NOT GROUT the joint or gap at the walls, if this is what you meant, it's to be left open or caulked and then covered by the baseboard, you need it for expansion.:mad:

R&D Tile 03-26-2006 06:25 PM

Unless this floor is over a sleeper system and it sounds like it isn't, you CAN NOT tile this floor the way it is, you will have to remove all that wood and tile on the concrete if in the right condition, no, there's nothing you can put over the plywood that is there now and have this work for tile, sorry.:)

And by the way, NEVER use 1/4" wood of any type where there is going to be ceramic tile or stone.:)

KUIPORNG 03-27-2006 08:51 AM

Response to R&D Tile
 
Hi R&D Tile,

I am sure you are an expect base on your user name, after reading your response, there is somthing I do not understand, how do the builder tile on the first floor and second floor of our home if what you say "Cannot tile on plywood"... our home first floor and second floor are all plywood subflooring and there are tiles in lot of area...

I sure can see why tiling on concrete is the best solid tiling as there is no movement on concrete, I do not think tiling on plywood is not possible though... the reason we have plywood on our basement floor, is kind of unusual, but do serve the insulation purpose, and minor leak problems can also be resolved because water underneath the plastic raised floor have space to evapoluate...

R&D Tile 03-27-2006 08:11 PM

Yes, you CAN tile over plywood floors, just not directly on it, use a backerboard or membrane over the plywood first, then your tile.;)

This assuming the joist system and flooring above it meet specs for tile or stone.


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