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-   -   Tub separation problem in bathroom redo (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/tub-separation-problem-bathroom-redo-118390/)

nirakara 09-26-2011 07:41 PM

Tub separation problem in bathroom redo
 
Hi all, I have a question that seemingly can't be looked up on the internet so I'm coming to the people behind the internet :)

I've just removed some 1960's bathtub walls which had gotten moldy and started to shed their tiles. They consisted of drywall between the 2x4s and the tub and cementboard over the tub flange with tiles on that.

It seems in modern construction we don't need two boards, just a single waterproof layer with proper adhesives placed over the flange. Unfortunately now I have a half inch gap between the tub and the wall on three sides and I would rather not have to buy and install drywall as well as the waterproof board. What would you guys do in this situation? Thanks so much!!!

P.S. It sucked a lot removing the half million nails that held up two layers of boards and the wire mesh they used to use on the corners of these walls. Just thought I'd vent to people that might understand my plight :)

oh'mike 09-26-2011 08:29 PM

A picture would help a lot----

Is there a 1/2" air space all around the tub?

Could you shift the tub back and to one side so you don't have to fur out all three sides?

The old style overlay install is hard to do any more--very few tiles have the special overlay caps available.

nirakara 09-26-2011 11:08 PM

Yeah unfortunately the bathtub is surrounded on three sides. I could push it towards one corner and build up the other wall but I don't know that the thick piping attached to it would move so easily (I assume that's the only thing holding it in place.

Here's a closeup of the gap:
http://i.imgur.com/pJJZj.jpg

And here's the whole thing:
http://i.imgur.com/jQ6Qi.jpg

Bud Cline 09-26-2011 11:31 PM

Fir-out the studs with 1X's and go again. NO DRYWALL. Use only a wallboard rated for wet locations, any cement board would do. Stop the wallboard just above the tub lip and caulk that juncture, then tile past the gap and caulk the tile to the tub. Don't forget to use either a moisture barrier on the studs before the wallboard or waterproof the tub-side of the wallboard but don't do both.:)

oh'mike 09-27-2011 08:21 AM

Boy--that's an oldie!

Now is the time to add a new mixer valve------

DangerMouse 09-27-2011 08:44 AM

Good point Mike.

I love our mixer, I haven't had "toilet flush shock" in the shower for many years.

DM

nirakara 09-27-2011 08:47 AM

Going with firring
 
Thanks guys, firring it is!! It seems so obvious now but I wouldn't have come up with it without coming here.

Also mike, why did you suggest I need a new mixer valve?

On a side note I still haven't figured out how to get that faucet off...

DangerMouse 09-27-2011 08:52 AM

The spout? Grip firmly with both hands, unscrew as normal.
Is this a shower as well? I can't tell from the photos.


DM

Bud Cline 09-27-2011 10:16 AM

Quote:

The spout? Grip firmly with both hands, unscrew as normal.
To remove the fill spout I would use two pipe wrenches and remove the spout by also removing the nipple. The depth of the wall is going to change when the wall studs are firred-out and the nipple will probably have to be changed anyway. Once the wall thickness is determined the length of the nipple can be determined.

Quote:

Is this a shower as well? I can't tell from the photos.
The spout has a diverter lever so that says there is a shower. I think I see a copper (?) riser coming from the spout supply area that would feed a spray head.
Now is the time to replace everything that is there.:)

Once the walls are firred-out and the wallboard installed there should be two outside corners that will have to also be addressed, probably with corner bead and joint compound.

Ron6519 09-27-2011 04:31 PM

I'd replace all the plumbing to the tub while you have it exposed. Install the new shower controls up to solar plexus height.

nirakara 09-27-2011 05:24 PM

Bigger project?
 
Dang guys, you're making my project more complicated by the message. Other than just revamping for the sake of making things pretty why should I change all the piping? The copper and welds look solid, or should i be concerned about the connections between them being rusty perhaps?

Anyway yes there is a shower and everything unscrewed just fine, it was just that spout that didn't have any kind of obvious set screws or ways to grip it to twist. I'll try harder tonight. Thanks!

Ron6519 09-27-2011 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nirakara (Post 737093)
Dang guys, you're making my project more complicated by the message. Other than just revamping for the sake of making things pretty why should I change all the piping? The copper and welds look solid, or should i be concerned about the connections between them being rusty perhaps?

Anyway yes there is a shower and everything unscrewed just fine, it was just that spout that didn't have any kind of obvious set screws or ways to grip it to twist. I'll try harder tonight. Thanks!

You say it's an old house. The bath has been renovated at least once, but the pipes look original to the house with the exception of that one copper pipe.
House was built mid '30's -mid '50's, that's along time to keep the pipes. The drains clog and the supplies leak. The fact that they're still there would make it red brass. Great pipe, but do you want to build a new bath around 60-80 year old plumbing?

oh'mike 09-28-2011 06:47 AM

The only reason we are suggesting updating the plumbing is this-----

It's easier now than it will ever be---Two hours for an experienced guy working slow---

After your tile is up and the bath looks nice----how would you do that in two hours?


Only makes sense to change the mixer --copper lines are O.K. I bet---

Use a good brand like Moen--Delta so parts will be available years from now.---Mike---


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