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dandgluna 06-15-2006 10:33 PM

tile questions
 
Hello! I have decided to jump right in feet first on my bathroom remodeling project. I already moved the hideous shower doors from the 70's. Bu ot course, there are holes in the tiles. I decided to remove the tiles that have the holes and those in the row with them. I want to install a new tile to look like a border. My questions:

1. While removing the door, a couple of tiles broke out with the sheet rock. When purchasing sheet rock for this purpose, what should I ask for? I am assuming I will need to replace all of the sheetrock under this area. Is it possible to buy just the amount of sheetrock needed or am I going to have a lot of left over sheetrock? (The tiles I am removing are 4 in. square and are about 4 feet up the wall)

2. I want to remove the caulk from in between the tiles. Is there something that I can use to remove it easily without messing up the tiles.

Drawknife 06-16-2006 08:04 AM

1. While removing the door, a couple of tiles broke out with the sheet rock. When purchasing sheet rock for this purpose, what should I ask for? I am assuming I will need to replace all of the sheetrock under this area. Is it possible to buy just the amount of sheetrock needed or am I going to have a lot of left over sheetrock? (The tiles I am removing are 4 in. square and are about 4 feet up the wall)

First of all how much sheetrock did you break off? Did you just tear the paper or is it an actual hole, which is what I'm guess since those tiles (esp being there so long) will really tear up the sheetrock when you try to remove them, thus making it really difficult to "patch" just a row.

Anyways, for bathroom (or anywhere that's a wet location) you need to get what is called green board. Green board is specially made to be water resistant. Any of the BORGs should carry it, and it will come in 4x8 sheets, but the cost should be 10.00 or less.

2. I want to remove the caulk from in between the tiles. Is there something that I can use to remove it easily without messing up the tiles.
Not much special here except elbow grease. I would start by using a sharp razor blade to cut the caulk (being careful not to scratch the tub by going too deep) and begin removing with fingers. Again, the BORGs should carry a small plastic tool that has a hook on it to remove caulk that you could try also.

dandgluna 06-16-2006 09:26 AM

Thank you for your relpy.

There was a big chunk of tile removed with the tile. It removed a section about 6 inches wide by about 9 inches long.

Looks like the elbow grease is going to have to be what it takes. I noticed that this are of tiles are very close together.

Since the sheetrock messed up, my idea was to remove the caulk and then cut down throught the sheetrock under it to prevent the other tiles from being disrupted. Do you think that will work?

Drawknife 06-16-2006 02:06 PM

I'm a little confused and am trying to picture where the problem is? :confused:

I guess what I have in my mind (after re-reading the post) that you need to remove a vertical row of tile that runs from the tub 4' up the wall. I also am assuming the the row that needs removed is and edge row? - that only has 1 row of tile next to it?


At any rate I don't think its caulking between the tile, but rather grout. The of course underneath the grout & tile is thinset mortar, which is what lets the tile adhere to the wall. In that case, you won't be removing the grout with a utility knife or razor.

To remove that you'll need either a dremel type tool with a grout remover bit attachment. Or a small cold chisel and hammer to chip away the grout. Once that is removed you'll be able to run a utility knife down the sheetrock and score the drywall.

I think what I'd do is use the utility knife to score the remaining area of sheetrock you want removed, then use a small drywall saw to cut out that area.

The hard part is going to be cutting the piece of drywall to fit what you just removed and getting it put back in so it looks good. You're have get some drywall tape (mesh type will be the easiest for) and drywall mud to cover the seems. The sanding it down, repeat until there isn't too much of a noticeable seem (hump) where the new and old meet.


Again, maybe I don't totally understand what you're needing/wanting to do, so take this with a grain of salt.

dandgluna 06-16-2006 05:58 PM

Yes, the row of tiles I want to remove are the vertical one. They are 4 inches wide and they are on the outside edge of the tiles. So it sounds to nme like you understand exactly what I am saying. I am working on learning the DIY terminology. :)

Thanks for the advise! I do have a dremel and was hoping there would be a piece to use with it. It sounds more simple with that, but what seems simple some times turns out to be very difficult! :cool:

Thanks again!

Bonus 06-16-2006 10:24 PM

If you go to a tile store you can get a "Grout Saw", this is a thin toothed tool that will take the grout out from between the tiles.

I, too, am a little confused about what is going on. You removed some edge tiles and some of the drywall behind them came too? So now you have holes into the stud cavity of the wall? To replace the drywall will require some backing to support it, you can't simply put some drywall in the hole and expect it to hold the tiles for very long. Perhaps I'm not getting the problem, wouldn't be the first time.:confused:

I would disagree about using greenboard, it is not appropriate for behind tile in a wet location, use any of the cement board products (hardiboard, cbu etc.) or dens armor plus.

dandgluna 06-16-2006 10:59 PM

I may have to add some 2x4's to help attach the drywall. Thanks for pointing that out. I am not sure what you mean by stud cavity though.Can you clarify that for me? Thanks!


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