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tb582 08-01-2010 12:05 PM

Three Windows at once
 
5 Attachment(s)
Hey Guys - looking to fix up the windows on the side of my house....

I'm going to order them all at once then tackle them separately.
  • One currently has an air conditioner in it - I want to box this one up and need to know where to begin.
  • The second one is in the kitchen, next to the air conditioner and I don't even think you can really call it a window, its more like a piece of plexiglass fastened to some sort of frame. - anyway this one I don't want to just replace but put in a slightly longer and less wide window.
    • as a side note my neighbor just replace his identical window (which I dont think looks all that good) (beige house in the pic below)
  • The thrid window is the attic window which I'm thinking is going to need some sort of fan attached or something, but this one will be the last that I tackle.
I think I want to box up the one with the air conditioer first - Where do I start? My biggest concern is that this side of the house gets pounded every time it rains so I want to ensure things are done top notch and water tight :)

I recently replaced the two windows in my son's room thats the extent of my knowlegde :)

Just Bill 08-04-2010 07:29 AM

The correct way to close off a window is to frame in the opening after removing the window frame and trim, then install housewrap/moisture barrier, and reside with the same siding. Install insulation/drywall inside.

It is possible to install a replacement window in the other frame, but since you are redoing siding, anyhow, replace the whole window with a new construction unit. The upper window also needs a complete unit.

That looks like asbestos or mineral siding, very fragile and not easily removed in one piece, work slowly and do not breath the dust if you cut.

tb582 08-04-2010 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Just Bill (Post 480180)
The correct way to close off a window is to frame in the opening after removing the window frame and trim, then install housewrap/moisture barrier, and reside with the same siding. Install insulation/drywall inside.

It is possible to install a replacement window in the other frame, but since you are redoing siding, anyhow, replace the whole window with a new construction unit. The upper window also needs a complete unit.

That looks like asbestos or mineral siding, very fragile and not easily removed in one piece, work slowly and do not breath the dust if you cut.

Thanks - so the housewrap/moisture barrier can you send me some links of a good mfg? is that just the black felt paper? Also once I have it framed up I'm assuming that I just use plywood on the outside?

tb582 05-18-2011 08:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tb582

Thanks - so the housewrap/moisture barrier can you send me some links of a good mfg? is that just the black felt paper? Also once I have it framed up I'm assuming that I just use plywood on the outside?

I hope to get this project done on Memorial day weekend. Couple of questions.

Still looking for guidance on the house wrap/moister barrier, is it ok that I'll only be putting that where the hole is now? And not along the whole side od the house? I'm imagining that now I'll have a XbyX foot section of that side of my house that will have this. Possibly the same with the insulation on the inside? Can you point me in the right direction of what house wrap/moister barrier to buy???

Tom Struble 05-18-2011 10:12 PM

you can use 30 lb felt or ''tar'' paper but what you need to understand is for any weather resistant barrier to work it has to be lapped properly

meaning it needs to be installed shingle style,the piece you install must go over the existing paper at the bottom and under the existing paper at the top

simple i know but you be surprised how many think it doesn't matter,but actually it's critical

tb582 05-19-2011 09:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomstruble (Post 650691)
you can use 30 lb felt or ''tar'' paper but what you need to understand is for any weather resistant barrier to work it has to be lapped properly

meaning it needs to be installed shingle style,the piece you install must go over the existing paper at the bottom and under the existing paper at the top

simple i know but you be surprised how many think it doesn't matter,but actually it's critical


ahh thats a great point! - and the felt paper just gets nailed or stapled to the plywood that goes on the outside?

I'll be ordering my replacement shakes for the outside as well...

http://www.gaf-weatherside.com/profile.html

kwikfishron 05-19-2011 05:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tb582 (Post 650883)
ahh thats a great point! - and the felt paper just gets nailed or stapled to the plywood that goes on the outside?

I'll be ordering my replacement shakes for the outside as well...

http://www.gaf-weatherside.com/profile.html

Wow, $450 a square for FS Shingles.:eek:

tb582 05-23-2011 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tb582 (Post 650883)
ahh thats a great point! - and the felt paper just gets nailed or stapled to the plywood that goes on the outside?

bump on this...

tb582 05-25-2011 09:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tomstruble
you can use 30 lb felt or ''tar'' paper but what you need to understand is for any weather resistant barrier to work it has to be lapped properly

meaning it needs to be installed shingle style,the piece you install must go over the existing paper at the bottom and under the existing paper at the top

simple i know but you be surprised how many think it doesn't matter,but actually it's critical

Should I be using a piece of tyvek or tar paper?


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