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Old 03-22-2009, 07:17 PM   #1
"Daniel"
 
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Texturing a New Ceiling


Hello,

I have several sections of new drywall on my ceiling, mixed with existing. They are bigger than patches, as I removed large pieces for attic access. I am now trying to texture the new sections. My basic problem is that I can't get any compound built up. I have blended the compound to the recommended "milkshake" or "pancake batter" thickness. I started with a 1/2" roller, then moved up to a 3/4" roller when I didn't like the results. I still didn't like the 3/4" either. It appears to be merely painting on the compound rather than putting it on thickly. Also, it's only even passably thick for about 2 ft, then it barely covers. I'm putting it on clean drywall. I didn't bother mudding anything but the joints. I tried to get a large amount of compound on my stippling brush, but it wouldn't leave much behind. The existing ceiling has very nice, thick and sharp, defined peaks. Mine were without any shape. I quit before I got too far along.

In this photo, the left side is my new attempt, the right is the existing.

Any advice would be great.
Thank you!!
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Texturing a New Ceiling-ceiling1.jpg  

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Old 03-24-2009, 02:17 PM   #2
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Texturing a New Ceiling


What does your brush look like? Was it "flat" when you bought it or were the bristles sticking straight up?? Please post a pic.
I use a 3/4" nap roller. You don't need a "large amount of compound" on the brush. Once you get the brush "wet" with joint compound, you don't need to add any more or "dip" the brush in the compound. Don't try to cover too much area before you come back and "blop" with the brush. The raw sheetrock sucks the moisture out of the compound quickly and won't "pull" the pattern down. Looks like your mud may be TOO thin from your picture. And your comparison, I hope, is when the new stipple was still very wet. Or maybe you're using a "lightweight" compound?? That WOULD be a problem. I ask because the light weight dries more of a grey than white. Normally the NEW texture dries whiter than the OLD just because of "aging". Get back to me with some answers and we'll see if we can figure it out......

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Old 03-24-2009, 08:49 PM   #3
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Texturing a New Ceiling


I am using a lightweight compound, which I bought with the walls in mind rather than the ceiling. I assumed the old ceiling is white because it was painted white, but I don't know enough about colors when dry. I intended to paint the ceiling after texturing, just in case there were color inconsistencies with the old stuff. It's 20 years old, after all.

Although my mixture was pancake batter thick, or even milkshake thick, perhaps I thinned it out too much? I consumed what seemed like a large amount but it didn't stick to itself stiffly like I expected. I'm going to run out anyway, perhaps I should get powder instead of premix, and also not use lightweight on the ceiling. If I go for a thicker blend, I'm hoping it'll work better. At some point, it'll be so thick that a roller won't work anymore.

This photo shows the two brushes I have to choose from. I used the left one because it stood up more, but the bristles are bent in directions that don't seem like they'd texture well. Still, the primary problem is the thin amount of compound I've put up, rather than the shape of my stomps. I was hoping someone would look at the original photo and say, "oh yeah, that's what it'd look like if you were too thin," or some similar problem.
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Last edited by quinocampa; 03-24-2009 at 08:50 PM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-24-2009, 09:48 PM   #4
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Texturing a New Ceiling


Lightweight compound is ABSOLUTELY NOT suitable for texturing (and in my opinion for anything else). If anything, the new mud (regular ready mix) will normally dry WHITER than the old due to aging even if it has been painted. That's what gave me a clue as to part of the problem. Of your two brush choices, the one on the right would be the one to use. You"ll have to scrape/sand the lightweight back off and start over.
"Milkshake/pancake batter consistency" may be a BIT thin. You want it to flow when you roll it though. Make sure your roller is thoroughly saturated with (REGULAR) compound or you won't get good coverage. It won't hurt to dampen your roller with water before beginning. It may take rolling over the small area you're working with a couple of times just to get the roller "full" of mud. Take a 4" or 6" drywall knife and put mud on your brush to get it saturated with compound. You need to actually put some mud on the back side of the tips of the brush to get them to "fall" away from the brush. You want those ends to be "flexible to help create the pattern. After you "prep" the brush, "blop/stomp" it against the ceiling to get rid of the excess mud (before you roll any mud on). Once the brush is saturated and "limp", roll your mud over where you just got rid of the excess and work your way over the patched area. Don't try to cover too much area before you hit it with the brush. Don't try to go too far before you dip your roller in the mud again. When you are using the brush, turn it about 1/4 turn (after you pull it back away from the ceiling) between "stomps" to get the pattern more random. If you get an area that looks thin, roll back over it and "stomp" it again.
That's about the best I can explain the procedure. Hope it helps......
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Last edited by bjbatlanta; 03-24-2009 at 09:51 PM.
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Old 03-24-2009, 10:53 PM   #5
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Texturing a New Ceiling


Okay BJ, it reads pretty clearly. I have faith that I can work it out. I posted a few weeks ago when I hadn't taped any joints yet, fretting over a section with new and old walls and ceiling. That worked out well enough, so if I can manage this, I'll be golden. Thank you for your help! If I fail, I'll enlist a pro (oh my wounded pride...).
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Old 03-25-2009, 10:01 AM   #6
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Texturing a New Ceiling


Sounds harder than it actually is, once you get set up. (Takes longer to get ready and clean up than to do the actual work.) And I forgot to mention; screw the brush onto a roller pole for best results (if you weren't already doing so). Does much better than trying to "stomp" by hand on a ladder. Drop the brush 16 -18" from the ceiling after each hit on the ceiling and remember to rotate it as you go. When you stop to roll some more, just set the brush face down on a bucket lid. Be sure to wash the lid before putting it back on the bucket or you'll end up with "chunks" in the mud when you pull the lid off again....

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