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-   -   Table or Circular saw for cutting 16" from 4x8 (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/table-circular-saw-cutting-16-4x8-11613/)

KUIPORNG 09-17-2007 11:36 AM

Table or Circular saw for cutting 16" from 4x8
 
When doing the closet, I need to cut a 16" x 96" from a 4x8 3/4 plywood....

as this is a big piece of wood from a big piece of wood... I am figuring whether I should use a circular saw or table saw to make the cut.... knowing that table saw can do a better straight cut... but such a big/heavy piece to move along table saw would be difficult... circular saw is easy to manipulate but may not be able to make an as good straight cut as table saw...

anyone can share which is the best way to do it or any tips in achieveing the best result... thanks...

although I am doing everything myself so far... but considering ask my wife to help on this one, ask her to hold the big piece on one end when we going through the table saw thing... it noise/dust will sure scare a hell out of her though...

also once the piece is cut, I know I need to sand it and prime it then paint over it(white), now these are the questions:

- can I prime it with the left over primer which I use to prime the drywall, or need to use different type of primer for wood.

- when I sand, do I sand the surface or I only need to sand the edge

- after sanding, do I put drywall mud on the edge to hide those wood texture or do I put drywall mud all over before priming

thanks for answering these additional questions, as you probably figure... this is my first time doing furnitures stuff... (If I don't count those unofficial ones in the past)... want to do everything right...

tigerbalm2424 09-17-2007 12:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 63433)
When doing the closet, I need to cut a 16" x 96" from a 4x8 3/4 plywood....

as this is a big piece of wood from a big piece of wood... I am figuring whether I should use a circular saw or table saw to make the cut.... knowing that table saw can do a better straight cut... but such a big/heavy piece to move along table saw would be difficult... circular saw is easy to manipulate but may not be able to make an as good straight cut as table saw...

anyone can share which is the best way to do it or any tips in achieveing the best result... thanks...

although I am doing everything myself so far... but considering ask my wife to help on this one, ask her to hold the big piece on one end when we going through the table saw thing... it noise/dust will sure scare a hell out of her though...

Its just as easy to make a straight cut with a circular saw in my opinion. I have a straight piece of aluminum about 2 inches wide by 8 feet long and about 1/4" thick. I simply clamp the metal on top of the 4X8 sheet exactly 1.5 inches(this is the distance on the saw from the outside of the quide to the blade) from the line I need to cut and then just run the circular guide along the piece of metal all the way down. Just as straight as a table saw in my opinion.

All you need is two clamps and something rigid, 8 feet long, and straight. A piece of wood would work too.

KUIPORNG 09-17-2007 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tigerbalm2424 (Post 63437)
Its just as easy to make a straight cut with a circular saw in my opinion. I have a straight piece of aluminum about 2 inches wide by 8 feet long and about 1/4" thick. I simply clamp the metal on top of the 4X8 sheet exactly 1.5 inches(this is the distance on the saw from the outside of the quide to the blade) from the line I need to cut and then just run the circular guide along the piece of metal all the way down. Just as straight as a table saw in my opinion.

All you need is two clamps and something rigid, 8 feet long, and straight. A piece of wood would work too.


I would agree with you if I could use the circular saw guide, but the guide is only good for 10" , and I need 16" ... that means I cannot use the guide and have to do it bare eye/hand which is a bit concern me... and I am thinking you have to go nonstop 8' while running the saw which also tough, as once you stop and start again, the edge will show somthing I believe...

tigerbalm2424 09-17-2007 12:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 63438)
I would agree with you if I could use the circular saw guide, but the guide is only good for 10" , and I need 16" ... that means I cannot use the guide and have to do it bare eye/hand which is a bit concern me... and I am thinking you have to go nonstop 8' while running the saw which also tough, as once you stop and start again, the edge will show somthing I believe...

Quick rendition. I meant the guide on the circular saw. Just use the circular, you dont need the table saw.

http://i166.photobucket.com/albums/u...lm2424/saw.jpg

tigerbalm2424 09-17-2007 12:23 PM

Oops, those numbers arent correct. the 16 inches should be measure to the blade, not the guide. The black thing labeled guide is meant to be the 8 foot piece of metal that is clamped down on the 4X8 sheet of wood. The side of the circular saw just runs along the edge of the metal guide. Its very simple.

And yes, you would need to cut a continuous 8 foot cut. How did you expect to do it with the table saw?

KUIPORNG 09-17-2007 12:26 PM

thanks a lot, what a inspiration... that prove it is always good to ask... so I guess you mean to create a manual guide of thing instead of using those metal thing which come with the saw... I see.. wonder how come I couldn't figure that out... I guess I don't necessary use a metal guide, I can in fact use a 2x4 as guide as well as long as I cah clamp th thing onto the wood.... for your other question table saw, stop and restart is not that big a issue as table saw handle that much better.... but I agree with you I am going to use the circular saw...

now please someone answer my painting question...

jogr 09-17-2007 03:24 PM

A 2x4 might not be as straight as you want it and the small imperfections and wood surface might cause your circular saw to hang up or move unevenly.

They also make reasonable priced guides that clamp to your circular saw that will cut up to about 24" wide from plywood. I got one at sears a few years ago that works fine.

Can't answer your paint questions but obviously you should choose plywood suitable for painting.

Ron6519 09-17-2007 05:41 PM

You just clamp a straight edge to the work and run the saw against it.
You do not use drywall mud on plywood in preparation for painting. You sand it and prime it with a primer made for wood. If you do not want to see the plies telegraph through the primer, veneer it first.
And you NEVER let your wife help you manuver a 4x8 sheet of anything on a table saw unless you want to spend some quality time in the Emergency room.
Ron

KUIPORNG 09-18-2007 08:19 AM

thank you guys, I did it this morning... I did use a 2x4 as a guide which I see it is pretty straight or straight enough for me... I draw the line first and find the 2x4 is kind of fall onto the line to ensure it being straight... the cut goes smoothly.... I would think it is rahter difficult to find a steel metal guide 8' long and I don't want to buy it either...I didn't use drywall mud... I did sand a bit... but then I just use the leftover drywall primer to paint it.. as I don't want to purchase another can of primer thinking they probably about the same... so you probably now know I am not a prefectionist.... anyway... it seems ok... afterall... it just a for a closet... don't want to kill myself for it....thanks again everyone...

KUIPORNG 09-18-2007 10:46 AM

veneer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 63482)
If you do not want to see the plies telegraph through the primer, veneer it first. Ron

How do you "veneer" the plywood?, like with what material...

thanks...

NateHanson 09-18-2007 11:17 AM

Just attach a thin strip of wood trim to the edges, and sand it flush to the surface of the plywood. You can use glue and brad nails, or some biscuits, or a tongue and groove arrangement to hold it in place. For painted work, bondo wood filler also works very well to obscure edges of plywood, or fill voids and grain in the surface. It's very quick to apply, easy to sand, quick drying.

KUIPORNG 09-18-2007 01:04 PM

Thanks, Natehanson, just to confirm, I guess you mean this

http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-71932/Detail

not those tooth-paste type wood filler which is a pain to apply

Can I get this from HD as I don't recall seeing them before... I suppose the are easy to apply like using a paint bush kind of stuff....

cutting thin wood strip...etc. is kind of too much work... don't mind doing that if I am building a desk... but for a closet shelf... kind of too much work.. rather than leave it alone... but that wood filler if easy to do I wouldn't mind doing that...

that

NateHanson 09-18-2007 05:04 PM

solid wood edging is more sensible for furniture that will not be painted, or is higher end painted work. For basic stuff, the bondo will work fine. I believe I've bought it near the adhesives section in Home Depot.

MinConst 09-18-2007 09:50 PM

Bondo is an automotive body filler product that works well on wood repairs.

yummy mummy 09-19-2007 08:35 AM

kuiporng
 
I want to see a picture of your closet......


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