Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > Remodeling

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-25-2009, 11:07 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 5
Share |
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


I have bathroom with sink and toilet in finished basement. Few days ago I notice some mold on the floor molding when I tried to touch sheetrock it was all wet. I removed molding and cut wet sheetrock (about 5’’X 40’’ area).
Sheetrock was installed on the metal stud. When I looked at the stud that was attached to the floor there was some condensation of the stud. I think sheetrock got wet because of the condensation accumulated on the stud and because stud attached to concrete floor (much colder then air in the basement) there was water condensation.
What should I do to resolve this problem? Thanks in advance for any suggestions.

bobdd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 08:20 PM   #2
Renovation Contractor
 
Paragon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
Posts: 226
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Bob,

Okay first of all I want you to know that metal studs are commonly used residentially and commercially so my point is that these are not out of their element.

I next question is where is all of the water coming from? I don't think that much water would be coming from condensation and if it was the face of the metal stud would be deteriorated (the face that the drywall attachés to) is it?

My next question for you is where else does water appear? Have you seen any other signs of water infiltrating the bathroom? Another question I have for you is was the bottom of the Sheetrock in contact with the flooring (whether it be the slab, tile that may be in the bathroom, linoleum, vinyl etc.

Also where was the Sheetrock in proximity to other things in the bathroom? Was it close to the toilet, shower, sink etc. Do you have any pictures of the bathroom and/ or the water damage area.

I will watch this thread and see where these questions go.

__________________
James D. Van Raden
Owner, Paragon Renovations Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
"Committed to providing the finest renovation services available"
Paragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 08:32 PM   #3
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,680
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


It is arguable that moisture could condensate on a metal stud under certain circumstances. The presence of mold says that this has been an ongoing problem. Condensation on a metal stud inside a wall would dissipate almost as fast as it would collect I would think. No real chance for mold to grow. I'm thinkin' you should be looking for either a water leak nearby OR a copper or galvanized water pipe above the the wet area where condensation can form and drip from.

My guess is if you have been running a lawn sprinkler then the supply pipe serving the sprinkler is probably located above the wet area.

Metal studs are used in basement walls all the time all over the country without issue.
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 09:11 PM   #4
Renovation Contractor
 
Paragon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
Posts: 226
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Bud,

I am going to guess that the drywall is on the slab or flooring and that the moisture has been wicking up the rock. I am also going to guess that the source of the water is a significant source and very much like a water pipe or a toilet or a shower or something significant contributing water to the source of the water damage.

Yes you are correct the mold tells us it has been something that is active and has been for a period of time however the amount of time is questionable as mold can grow in a very short time if the conditions are right. The cold also will contribute to the mold growth as one may not think this would be a contributing factor however an air conditioned space can inhibit mold growth. The dehumidification systems that mitigation companies use produce heat couple with drying and that is the most effective for drying out a wet environment.

This will be something that we will have to wait for a reply from the OP to see what different pieces make the puzzle whole. Some pictures may also help us understand what is at hand. So we will wait and see what the OP comes back with.

Take care and what will the verdict be?
__________________
James D. Van Raden
Owner, Paragon Renovations Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
"Committed to providing the finest renovation services available"
Paragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 09:41 PM   #5
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,680
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


I'll buy the drywall wicking moisture from a slab but that wouldn't deposit obvious moisture on a metal stud I wouldn't think.
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 09:49 PM   #6
Renovation Contractor
 
Paragon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
Posts: 226
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


No, you are right I also think there is some active source of water somewhere. I have worked with metal studs and I do know or at least would bet a lot of money it isn't condensation from moisture in the air.
__________________
James D. Van Raden
Owner, Paragon Renovations Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
"Committed to providing the finest renovation services available"
Paragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 10:00 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 489
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


I have seen condensation on basement walls that caused pooling on the floor. No one has mentioned this possibility yet. If it isn't a leaky pipe, this is probably it. Do you have insulation in your walls in the basement? If not, the warm moist air is hitting the concrete and creating condensation. Let us know what you discover.
__________________
Josh Jaros Remodeling in The Woodlands, Texas www.jarosbros.com
jaros bros. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2009, 10:20 PM   #8
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,680
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


OK bobdd, the balls in your court. Need some more information if you haven't figured it out already.
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 08:05 AM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 5
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Thanks everyone for replies I will try to make some pictures of the wall.
Basement has one doc from HVAC system from first floor but this year we didn't turn on AC so there was't much ventilation in the basement.
Contractor who build bathroom didn't install any ventilation. Probably because it is very difficult to get to the outside wall. The wall that had mold problem faces basement so there is not outside wall.
Metal stud connected right to the concrete floor when I cut some sheetrock I could not find any other signs of water inside. There is no pipes and nothing touching that wall. Sheetrock outside of the same wall (facing basement) is dry. Floor in the bathroom is tiles and the only part of sheetrock that was wet is part that was touching floor.
I cut moldy wet sheetrock and ran dehumidifier for 24 hours and right now it looks like everything is dry. Dehumidifier produced some heat and probably it helped to resolve this issue. For some reason sheetrock that was installed in the bathroom is regular sheetrock not waterproof one.
I was also thinking to put some foam to the metal stud that connected to the floor before patching wall.

Last edited by bobdd; 06-26-2009 at 08:19 AM.
bobdd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 09:03 AM   #10
General Contractor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stafford, VA
Posts: 534
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Some other things to consider: When the bathroom was built was the rough in plumbing there or did they cut the slab to install it. If so any number of issues maybe causing water problems. They may not have glues the pipe together, they may the shower and toilet dumping straight into base course, the vapor barrier may have been cut out and not replaced. Believe it or not I have seen all of this done before. Another issue may be as simple as a bad seal on the wax ring of the toilet. In bathrooms that do not get used a lot this sometimes goes unnoticed. The IRC code only requires moisture proof drywall in the surround, however the code does require a vent fan with a minimum 50cfm vented outside of the structure in the bathroom on a dedicated line. The lack of a fan will cause moisture build up in a bathroom. I have seen moisture build up in attics so bad from improperly vented fans that the insulation looked like it had been submerged in water and you can imagine what the drywall under it looked like. All of these problems can usually be avoided if permits are pulled however I am seeing more and more work done without permits to cut costs. I am also seeing alot of trade work get done by people not licensed to such work. That said I have also seen inspectors miss many a thing durring the course of an inspection.
ARI001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 09:40 AM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 5
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


I bought house when basement was already finished but I know that contractor had permit and it was closed. There is no shower in the bathroom so moisture from shower is not a concern.
Toilet is not leaking that was the first thing that checked and there is not moisture around it.
I am planning to remove sink tonight to inspect drain pipe to make sure is not leaking somewhere inside the wall.
Once I find cause of the problem I am planning to path with waterproof sheetrock.
I am wondering if waterproof sheetrock is required for the bathrooms.
bobdd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 09:58 AM   #12
General Contractor
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Stafford, VA
Posts: 534
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Waterproof sheetrock is only required in the bath surround and may not be covered with a vapor barrier (bath tub/shower area) by IRC code. That is the prevailing code though most localities choose what parts of the code they are going to adapt or ommit as well as if they will require more strict specifications. You can check with your local building department if you are unsure. I prefer to Densarmour (GP) in bathrooms / kitchens/ basements/ and garages but it is not as of yet required in those locations.
ARI001 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 12:30 PM   #13
Tileguy
 
Bud Cline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 9,680
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Waterproof drywall does not exist. There is no such thing as waterproof drywall. Where are you guys getting this information?
Bud Cline is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 12:42 PM   #14
Renovation Contractor
 
Paragon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
Posts: 226
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Bud I think they may be referencing cement board?
__________________
James D. Van Raden
Owner, Paragon Renovations Moorhead, MN/ Fargo, ND
"Committed to providing the finest renovation services available"
Paragon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-26-2009, 01:16 PM   #15
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 5
Default

Steel Studs Moisture problem


Water-resistant drywall has been around for over 25 years. Many people recognize it from the green-colored paper facing. In fact, it is affectionately called green board by builders and drywall [COLOR=#3533bd! important][COLOR=#3533bd! important]hangers[/COLOR][/COLOR].

bobdd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Floor bounce joist sistering joehomeowner Building & Construction 24 05-10-2009 01:50 PM
Where does construction lumber come from? handbanana Off Topic 22 06-20-2008 11:20 PM
Plan for solving basement moisture problem krx Remodeling 1 12-04-2005 07:00 PM
Moisture and Mold problem Vin HVAC 1 02-24-2005 05:50 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.