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jwedel 12-01-2013 10:41 PM

1st serious DIY Bathroom remodel- wish me luck!
 
4 Attachment(s)
My wife and I have decided to re-model a small "guest" bathroom at the end of the house. The walls were OK, but the original peachy tile from 1963 just wasn't going to jive with our tastes. We have began the demo process, which is taking much longer than expected, since I was expect tiles to pop off rather easily, not like busting up 2" thick mud cement behind the tiles.
Attachment 78459

Attachment 78460

Attachment 78461
We have completed about 1/2 of the demo, since we will still be ripping out the rest of the peachy tile, including the peach vanity.
After some hardware updating and replacing rotted studs, we are hoping to install corrugated tin along the bottom where we are ripping off the tile.
Attachment 78462
One question I have- What should we install behind the tin? I didn't know if it would be wise to put in drywall, tile backerboard, or what?
Thanks in advance! I'll try to take pics and keep this updated.:thumbup:

Fantastic 12-01-2013 11:33 PM

If it were me, I'd put in green board drywall... It's great for damp areas and will give your tin some support. I don't think you need anything fancy.

PS. I like the tin idea :)

Windows on Wash 12-09-2013 06:04 PM

I like the paper free drywall for any wet areas.

You could also use a strip of cement board across the bottom if you are ever worried about overflow and moisture drawing from the bottom up.

jwedel 12-15-2013 09:38 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Finally had a free weekend to get a few things done. Got the rest of the one side demolition finished , replaced some studs & insulation, then got sheetrock put up. FYI- an air chisel makes all the difference in the world when tearing out this stuff
Attachment 78932

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As I type this, my wife in there painting the upper part of the walls we have finished. We're hoping to have this completely finished by this coming weekend, since all of the family is coming over for Christmas, so wish us luck.
Stay tuned, I'll try to keep this updated as we go along this week.

ghutch 12-16-2013 06:35 AM

"which is taking much longer than expected"

I find that true of every step of the way for my whole house renovation.

Betty Draper would have loved the bathroom you tore out.

I like what you've done, especially the wall color. What is it?

Fantastic 12-16-2013 06:50 AM

You're getting to the home stretch!!! Keep moving at a good pace and you'll be done before you know it.

joecaption 12-16-2013 06:58 AM

That drywall needed to be about 1/2" up off the floor. Reasons being, the floor is almost never flat or level, and it keeps any water that gets on the floor from wicking up the wall.
A whole lot easier if you take the time to remove the door casings, and that medicine chest so you do no have to try and work around it.
Would have been easier to finish if you had of had the tapered seam at the top not the bottom.
All live and learn mistakes we've all made.

jwedel 12-19-2013 11:28 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Thanks for the input joecaption, really do appreciate it, since this is my 1st experience with most of this stuff.

UPDATE
Been staying pretty busy and have gotten a lot done.
I had my brother over the other night and we tackled taking out the other wall and the sink/cabinet.
Attachment 79078

I didn't know what we would find under the cabinet, but it was just the wood sub-floor, which was about 2 1/2" below the current level of the floor tiles.
Attachment 79079

We layed down some 2x4's in the hole, then layed down a piece of 1/2" plywood, which brought it up pretty darn close to make the new tiles fit level. I got the tiles glued down this evening, and I'll give them some grout once it's ready and keep going along.
Attachment 79077

Windows on Wash 12-20-2013 06:54 AM

Looking good so far.

jwedel 12-25-2013 08:45 AM

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Alright, this job has gone much slower than I expected, so I didn't get it done by Christmas, but I did get close!
Here is the updated scene.
Attachment 79223

Attachment 79224

As you can see, we got the tin put up, and I'm really impressed with how it turned out. Luckily I had my younger brother over one night and he helped me with it, since it takes about 4 hands to hold everything just right before you can get a couple screws in.
All that is left is installing the sink, getting a new toilet, plus the wood trim around the top, bottom, & corners.
Maybe I can make some good progress in the next week or so :thumbup:

md2lgyk 12-25-2013 03:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fantastic (Post 1273617)
If it were me, I'd put in green board drywall... It's great for damp areas and will give your tin some support. I don't think you need anything fancy.

PS. I like the tin idea :)

Green board is horrible for damp areas. It's not even legal here any more.

jwedel 12-25-2013 07:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by md2lgyk (Post 1282616)
Green board is horrible for damp areas. It's not even legal here any more.

So what should I have used? Even the folks at the little hardware store in town said I should use green board. :huh:

jeffnc 12-27-2013 07:38 AM

Green board is fine. Don't take the negative comments the wrong way. Green board isn't "banned" or "illegal". It's just that it doesn't really have a good use. It doesn't have enough water resistance to stand up to "damp" areas, so what's the point? In other words, it's about the same as regular drywall. Which is fine. If you need waterproofing, use something else. Supposedly Green board has some water resistance but what use is it? They recommend it for "limited" "wet" areas like bathroom walls and kitchen backsplashes. Well, the thing is, those areas should never get wet behind the tiles to begin with. If water is getting to the drywall, something is wrong. So there really isn't a good use for Green board.

Having said that, using it in your application should be fine. Assuming you don't think it will get wet :-)

Speaking of which, I might have missed it, but is there anything stopping splashed water from getting over the top of the corrugated metal?

jeffnc 12-27-2013 07:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jwedel (Post 1280634)
I didn't know what we would find under the cabinet, but it was just the wood sub-floor, which was about 2 1/2" below the current level of the floor tiles.

And that is why you should always lay tile underneath a vanity. You never know when you'll want to change it out, or even put in a pedestal.

jeffnc 12-27-2013 07:48 AM

I like the wall color too. In general, I think darker colors look good in bathrooms, despite the normal advice that darker colors make rooms seem smaller, and therefore aren't so good for small rooms. For most bathrooms I think you should be going for cozy, not spacious (although some are designed to look better as spacious.)

I was looking for a darkish color for my office. I wanted something a little bold this time, and was even thinking of a lime-ish green at one point. That probably would have been a mistake, but people were all recommending these pale, grayish greens, which were exactly the subtle types of colors I usually love and use (not green per se, but pale/gray versions of colors.)

I ended up with BM Avocado, and I love it.
http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/paint-color/avocado

As opposed to these, which I normally would go with:
http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/p...r/greenhowmoss
or
http://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/p.../fernwoodgreen


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