DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   Remodeling (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/)
-   -   Siding: Cement Vs. Cedar (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/siding-cement-vs-cedar-179/)

Grumpy 07-07-2004 07:45 PM

Siding: Cement Vs. Cedar
 
Siding: Cedar vs. Cement

Cedar and Fibercement (Cement) siding are both high end materials. Either Cedar or Cement sidings require a slightly greater upfront investment over vinyl or aluminum; however the result is products that will last much longer.

Cedar siding is wood, from the Cedar tree. Cedar is one of the most durable of woods. Cement siding is made of a mixture of cement and cellulose. Cellulose is the fiber in Fiber cement. Cellulose is basically wood fibers. Either Cedar or Cement will be very strong and durable. Both are resistant to impact damage from hail or tree damage.

In an unfinished state cedar siding will last longer than cement siding. It is highly recommended to stain either cedar or cement siding for the longest lasting installation. In itís painted or stained state, Cement siding is rated to last much longer than cedar siding.

Both Cedar and Cement siding are available pre-finished. Cedar siding can be bought with a 15-year color warranty while Cement siding can be bought with a 15-year or 25-year color warranty. Usually these sidings can be stained by the factory with major manufacturers of stain like Cabot and Olympic.

Cement is more difficult to work with from an installation point of view. Special tools are required to cut cement siding and cement siding is very tough to hand nail. Cement kicks up an extreme amount of dust when cutting so special respirators are sometimes required when cutting cement siding.

Cedar is an attractive material to bees and other insects while cement is very insect resistant. Cedar can warp after years of prolonged UV exposure from the sun. This is due to heat and is most common on the east and west sides of the building. Cedar typically has a more attractive and unique grain pattern. Cement siding usually is more uniform and the lengths of the boards are usually of equal length. Cedar lengths usually vary in length.

www.reliableamerican.us

retiree 11-14-2004 08:39 PM

Hardi siding questions
 
Grumpy,

Installed 9 1/4" hardi siding (8" exposure) last Friday. The yard that supplied the material lent us a electric shear. What a beautiful tool. No mess, no dust, and pretty accurate cuts. I loved the Hardi-siding as well. Here's my question. We blind nailed each piece using a Bostitch siding gun which made it very easy. Is it common to have to face nail the bottom edge? Some area's seemed somewhat loose. Secondly, if we face nail the bottom as well as blind nail the top, will the acrylic paint cover the nails well? It looks great blind nailed, but I don't trust the 8" face to stay tight. I've been reading your posts and you seem to have the experience we need. Also, you discuss using prefinished siding and then getting the paint and caulk match from the company that applies the paint. Will that paint adhere to the galvanized nails reasonably well? Eagerly awaiting your answers as we have to finish a second side on Tuesday. Thanks in advance. Retiree.

Grumpy 11-15-2004 08:39 PM

At 8" siding you may have to occasionally face nail. 6" is typical and blind nailing usually is good enough. I prefer blind nailing.

Take some of the extra stain and touch up the nail heads. I assume you have some prefinished siding?

They paint should have no problem adhering to the nail head. Infact the paint is not paint at all. It is SOLID STAIN. You can even sometimes get the nails prefinished.

retiree 11-16-2004 10:58 AM

Hardi siding
 
Thanks for your quick reply.

Didn't use prefinished on this job (primed only), but have to help my son-in-law do his farmhouse next year down in Chapel Hill, NC.

Checked the price of cedar - $2.90 per foot.(heart attack city)
The Hardi was $7.80 per 12 ft. - Not bad at all. How much more expensive is the pre-finished?

The shear was definitely the way to go, as was the siding gun.

I normally use the Fine Homebuilding magazine forum. I love that magazine, even the ads are good. The forum is good and very easy to navigate. I found this one by typing in "Hardi Siding Forums".

Thanks again for your expertise, retiree(Mike Flynn)

Neil_K 11-19-2004 11:14 PM

8-1/4" x 12' Hardiplank w/woodgrain is $4.49 in Charlotte, NC area. Just looked at it at Lowe's over the weekend - just thought you might like to know...

housedocs 03-19-2005 01:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grumpy
Siding: Cedar vs. Cement

Cedar and Fibercement (Cement) siding are both high end materials. Either Cedar or Cement sidings require a slightly greater upfront investment over vinyl or aluminum; however the result is products that will last much longer.

Cedar siding is wood, from the Cedar tree. Cedar is one of the most durable of woods. Cement siding is made of a mixture of cement and cellulose. Cellulose is the fiber in Fiber cement. Cellulose is basically wood fibers. Either Cedar or Cement will be very strong and durable. Both are resistant to impact damage from hail or tree damage.

In an unfinished state cedar siding will last longer than cement siding. It is highly recommended to stain either cedar or cement siding for the longest lasting installation. In itís painted or stained state, Cement siding is rated to last much longer than cedar siding.

Both Cedar and Cement siding are available pre-finished. Cedar siding can be bought with a 15-year color warranty while Cement siding can be bought with a 15-year or 25-year color warranty. Usually these sidings can be stained by the factory with major manufacturers of stain like Cabot and Olympic.

Cement is more difficult to work with from an installation point of view. Special tools are required to cut cement siding and cement siding is very tough to hand nail. Cement kicks up an extreme amount of dust when cutting so special respirators are sometimes required when cutting cement siding.

Cedar is an attractive material to bees and other insects while cement is very insect resistant. Cedar can warp after years of prolonged UV exposure from the sun. This is due to heat and is most common on the east and west sides of the building. Cedar typically has a more attractive and unique grain pattern. Cement siding usually is more uniform and the lengths of the boards are usually of equal length. Cedar lengths usually vary in length.

www.reliableamerican.us


Another great thread Grumpy, posting just to bump it to the top. Really need to make it a sticky or better yet put a copy in the DIY Guides. Great info for diyers, just the facts without the hard sell! BTW You have great websites and great name recognition. Search Chicago and any one of several terms and boom there you are! Hat's off!


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:03 AM.


Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved