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Old 02-10-2012, 06:06 PM   #1
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Sand and Prime Trim


So I have this trim that got messed up when I refinished the floors with stain. I was a little bit messy.

Pictures added. Should I sand and paint, sand, prime, and paint or can I just paint them?

Just want it to look good. I have to add the quarter round later but it will be a rental in the future.
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Old 02-10-2012, 06:51 PM   #2
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Sand and Prime Trim


Personally, I would sand it then try painting. I don't think priming would be necessary, and you have nothing to lose by attempting to go straight from sanding to painting. You'll find out pretty quick if you should have primed. Try painting in one spot, and if it works, do the rest. Looks like most of it will be covered by the quarter-round, anyway.

A roll of painters tape and two minutes worth of time would have prevented the stain from getting on the baseboards in the first place.

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Old 02-10-2012, 06:59 PM   #3
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Sand and Prime Trim


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Originally Posted by Jay 78
Personally, I would sand it then try painting. I don't think priming would be necessary, and you have nothing to lose by attempting to go straight from sanding to painting. You'll find out pretty quick if you should have primed. Try painting in one spot, and if it works, do the rest. Looks like most of it will be covered by the quarter-round, anyway.

A roll of painters tape and two minutes worth of time would have prevented the stain from getting on the baseboards in the first place.
Well a lot of it was a bit messed up already though. Thanks for the reply. I'll try it out.

Any other quick comments. Gonna try it in the morning.

What grit should I start with?

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Old 02-10-2012, 09:12 PM   #4
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Sand and Prime Trim


Generally, my 'go to' grit is 80. That's just personal preference, and of course varies depending on the task.
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Old 02-10-2012, 09:16 PM   #5
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Sand and Prime Trim


No way just paints going to cover that mess. Prime it and then paint.
No excuse for that sloppy work. Now you have added a whole lot of work and expence.
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Old 02-10-2012, 11:12 PM   #6
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Sand and Prime Trim


The old addage is still true...."if it's worth doing, it's worth doing right.
That dark stain will bleed right through paint only. Sand with 80 or 100 grit, prime with a stain blocking primer (shellac or alkyd, not water based), and topcoat with either alykd or latex trim paint; I still put my money on alkyd for long term durability on trim. Be sure to protect fresh floors well, as both the primer and finish will easily get a tenacious bite on the fresh finish.
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Old 02-11-2012, 08:18 AM   #7
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What are your thoughts on this window? Bought sides of sash.
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Old 02-11-2012, 09:39 AM   #8
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If this were my project, I'd be scuff sanding the trim, priming it, then painting it. One extra step that'd probably be well worth it.

I'd sand down the window sash further than that. It looks to me like there's an adhesion problem with the old paint. You can't fix that. You have to remove it.
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Old 02-11-2012, 10:03 AM   #9
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If it was mine I'd remove all that old wood and replace it. It will come out far better.
A house that old will have lead paint so do not sand it if you plan on keeping it instead.
Use a stripper like Peel Away II instead.
Your going to find out the hard way that the floor finishing should have been done last. There will be scratchs and stuff spilled on it.
You always do ceilings, then the walls and trim then the flooring.
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Old 02-11-2012, 03:18 PM   #10
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Sand and Prime Trim


So I did some small sanding and used the primer and paint in one. Thoughts?

I don't know why but I feel like it will be easier to do the trim and then the walls.

Where I messed up was not getting the quarter round in before painting. :-/ I don't have the right saw for doing the cutting.
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Old 02-11-2012, 04:48 PM   #11
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I've decided to stop and get the quarter round. Gonna use a saw box to cut the right angles. I have a nail gun so it should be relatively quick.
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Old 02-11-2012, 05:38 PM   #12
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Trying to use a hand mitre saw box will get old real quick.
Your also going to find out there is no exact angles in an old house.
Your best bet to over come that is to cope all the pieces. That way there will be no gaps.
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Old 02-11-2012, 08:33 PM   #13
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Sand and Prime Trim


Right now you have a 1/2" or so leeway that the quarter round is going to cover. I'd finish what you are doing and paint the quarter round before installing it. That way you don't need to try to cut in along the floor (3 times with one coat primer and two coats of paint, I don't like paint/primer, usually takes 3 coats of that stuff anyway. All you need to do then is to fill and spot the nail holes in the quarter round.

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