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Old 09-20-2009, 12:21 PM   #1
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Removing Subfloor seem to have a little problem and have some questions


Hi

I took it upon myself to want to remove the old 5/8's OSB Sub-floor as it has major water damage and squeaks and has maybe 15 screws+Nails holding it together.

I have started out fine but my reciperating saw/Circular saw can only get so close to the stud wall(Sole Plate)

So It's been cut on a slight angel

Now I went and bought a new 2x8 to double up the other one so I can have a place to screw the new 5/8's plywood down along that wall as I would not have anywhere(schluter ditra says 5/8's will do fine) Spoke right to owner

2x8 Joists 16" OC

The Sub floor in the hallway is 5/8's too so I wanted everything the same height+Ditra will add some thickness and the 13x13 tiles to

Should I just leave the little bit of old 5/8's along this wall or is there another way beside getting a Toe Kick saw to remove it possibly a saw blade made for a reciperating saw.

When striping a old sub floor usually right to the joists do you ever get the 1"-2" under the Stud sole plate too.

I thought I would ask as I'm not really sure and don't know who else to ask on this subject.

Thanks

Any help would be great

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Old 09-20-2009, 02:02 PM   #2
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Removing Subfloor seem to have a little problem and have some questions


Not my area of expertise, but I would think the 2"x8" you add would be sufficient to control any "flex factor" that would cause the tile to crack. Lots of glue and screws/nails will ensure a good bond of the two framing members. If you're concerned, you might want to try one of the new "multi tools" on the market for flush/under cutting. They are very handy for a variety of uses. The Dremel runs about $100.00 at HD or Lowes.....

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Old 09-20-2009, 08:55 PM   #3
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Removing Subfloor seem to have a little problem and have some questions


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Originally Posted by bjbatlanta View Post
Not my area of expertise, but I would think the 2"x8" you add would be sufficient to control any "flex factor" that would cause the tile to crack. Lots of glue and screws/nails will ensure a good bond of the two framing members. If you're concerned, you might want to try one of the new "multi tools" on the market for flush/under cutting. They are very handy for a variety of uses. The Dremel runs about $100.00 at HD or Lowes.....

That Does not should like a bad idea at all thanks a lot

I could cut the OSB straight to the wall or as close

I saw that tool at the wood working show and didn't think anything of it but as what is that noise over there.
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Old 09-21-2009, 07:35 AM   #4
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Removing Subfloor seem to have a little problem and have some questions


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