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Old 11-10-2012, 05:31 PM   #1
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Remodel question.


Im leaving out many variables, but would anyone take this wall out between the kitchen and back porch and enclose the porch as part of the kitchen?

The "nook" that the refrigerator is located used to be a kitchen eat-in nook.
The refrigerator used to be next to the walk way, but made the kitchen feel smaller and made the walkway between the frig and the cabinets too tight feeling.
Can this nook be saved or is it too small, cramped, and dated??
We may not take the wall out if it will ruin the character of the house, or we may have to add on more porch to the rear of the existing porch.

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Remodel question.-image-4091629229.jpg



Remodel question.-image-1476253126.jpg
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:39 AM   #2
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Remodel question.


You're right. You left out too many variables here.
DIY or contractor?
It would be nice idea, but only you can answer if it's worth the time, $$ and headaches to you.
I'd start with a floor plan of what you would like it to be. "L" shaped kitchens can be awkward. Then get a couple of estimates and find out exactly what is involved.
You may find that by the time you expand that wall out, then rearrange the the plumbing, gas etc. for the kitchen you may be
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Old 11-11-2012, 06:40 AM   #3
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Remodel question.


Can you remove the wall, yes, but you will have to build supporting beams. That is a main supporting wall. Regardless, it needs a permit and depending on where you are, an engineer. There are ways to build the beams into the structure so they don't show, depends on your skill level and budget.

Last edited by Just Bill; 11-11-2012 at 06:42 AM.
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Old 11-11-2012, 02:14 PM   #4
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Remodel question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondesense
You're right. You left out too many variables here.
DIY or contractor?
It would be nice idea, but only you can answer if it's worth the time, $$ and headaches to you.
I'd start with a floor plan of what you would like it to be. "L" shaped kitchens can be awkward. Then get a couple of estimates and find out exactly what is involved.
You may find that by the time you expand that wall out, then rearrange the the plumbing, gas etc. for the kitchen you may be
I'm a struggling independent painter. I like to do some sweat equity now and then. I get stuck on whats the biggest improvement for the buck. I posted to get rough opinions on which direction to go in.
I've been working around a lot of construction and have some sense on procedure... And honestly sometimes enough to get into trouble too.
Even if I did get a home improvement loan and pay for a remodel, it seems getting some idea of what would be best is a smart way to begin.

Thank you for your input. If there's any other variables I could spell out or more pics I will put some on the forum. Thx.

Yes, I agree about an L shape kitchen being odd. Also, I'm aware of the hurdles of removing a load bearing wall. Maybe the house should be left as a starter, two bedroom home, fix up, rent out or sell. One thing I'm pretty sure of is it's not my final resting place lol, and like to think ahead when I get the chance.
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Old 11-11-2012, 07:52 PM   #5
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Remodel question.


you should also talk to a realtor. to see if its a good investment.
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Old 11-11-2012, 09:05 PM   #6
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Remodel question.


Just my opinion, Small additions are expensive.
Is no way you want to do this without a permit.
You have the demo of the brick wall, possibly can reuse some of it.
Looks like there is a concrete slab there .... it has to come out to get proper foundation.
You may be ok with the roof as is, but may be new insulation codes and may not be ok.
Then of course electrical and plumbing if you change the layout to better utilize the new space.

My whole point is, I agree with you that the nook is a bad idea and may need to go.
When you start adding up all the work that needs to be done and the different sub contractors involved. What the cost per square foot will be to bump that room out.

Foundation crew will already be on site, how much more would it cost to just bump it out further, add a extra room?
Maybe not a huge room, but an extra bedroom, or a man cave, tv room, dinning room?
I did one last year, it was a extension of the living room to use the existing front porch, turn it into a entryway. Was 8' x 16'
We had to cut into the roof to install the new header flush with the ceiling. A fixed cost.
When digging the footings, would not have cost that much more to dig them 18' x16' and more concrete to pour, but the time and labor to finish it would be the same.
Same with framing. Is fixed cost with headers and such, toss in some extra studs and go 18' instead of 8'

There are simply fixed cost you can not get away from, I think that job they spent about $12k, for another 5 or 6 grand could have built something that would have raised the value of their home.
Crunch the numbers and see for yourself.
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Old 11-20-2012, 10:52 PM   #7
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Remodel question.


You can gut out the outter exterior wall to extend the kitchen to your liking. I also agree with Just Bill. Get with your inspection office, seek out an engineer where you can see more of to what your up with. Electrical, plumbing will probably be no problem..as the house sits on a slab. I've remodeled allot of houses on a slab. If you have anything running off gas in the kitchen section..depending on how its routed, you just may need to do some revaluation of factors. In all that's where the assistance of the inspector/engineer comes in..making sure its of ordinance.
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Old 12-26-2012, 12:45 PM   #8
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Remodel question.


Before

Remodel question.-image-1526815505.jpg

After

Remodel question.-image-2985594352.jpg

The purple walls are the modification. The door to the basement used to be where the back of the refrigerator is. The back entrance door to the kitchen was three feet closer to the kitchen.


Thank you for your posts. I might be dreamin but I intend to do this myself. I know it seems a lot of work for a small improvement. I'm kind of a minimalist I guess. From a homeowner's point of view, it might be easier to visualize the effort required to take on a project even if it seems not worth it.

We've been living with an awkward kitchen for years and if nothing else, I'll get bragging rights and pictures to brag about. I like to use my home improvements as marketing and experience for work with others.

There will be several improvements yielding from moving into the porch just 3' x 6'.
1) the stairs to the basement will move back, toward the porch, 3' or so - ending low clearance at bottom of stairs - eureka!!
2) the refrigerator, as depicted, will move from the nook to where the basement entrance used to be...Reviving nook space-eureka!!

If the nook benches are the minimal 17.5" depth, they might be easier to get in and out of than the
last design. Also, I'm wondering if the slab would have to come out for just a walkway??
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Old 12-27-2012, 11:51 AM   #9
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Remodel question.


A couple thoughts if I may:
I'd give some thought to the elephant in the room. In other words, the refrigerator in the kitchen. I have the same problem. I have a big black refrigerator in the middle of a long wall and it totally breaks up the room and makes it look smaller. If at all possible I would try to get it on the "south" wall. Maybe where the stove is in the second picture.

Of your two drawings, I like the first one better, it gives more useable space. In the second one, half of what you are adding will be very expensive hallway.

What is this addition going to be used for? If it is going to be family area, maybe you could totally lose the "L" wall around the basement stairs and make it open to the kitchen.
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Old 12-27-2012, 12:53 PM   #10
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Remodel question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondesense
A couple thoughts if I may:
I'd give some thought to the elephant in the room. In other words, the refrigerator in the kitchen. I have the same problem. I have a big black refrigerator in the middle of a long wall and it totally breaks up the room and makes it look smaller. If at all possible I would try to get it on the "south" wall. Maybe where the stove is in the second picture.

Of your two drawings, I like the first one better, it gives more useable space. In the second one, half of what you are adding will be very expensive hallway.

What is this addition going to be used for? If it is going to be family area, maybe you could totally lose the "L" wall around the basement stairs and make it open to the kitchen.
Thanks for the reply. The frig used to be on the south wall next to the entrance to the room from the dining room. After the dated, built-in benches and table were removed from the nook, the frig took that space. It's too cramped on the south wall, bottle necks from the dining room, and eventually the south wall should and will turn into a counter with stools and be open to dining room. Since we haven't been using the nook that's where the frig hangs out.

Maybe the frig should go where the stove was in the first picture?? Then move the stove to the south wall level with future counter??

The "expensive hallway" allows the basement stairs to move north 3 feet for head clearance in the basement. AND allows an extra 3 feet of wall space for frig, counter, and stove. Yes expensive but accommodating. However will mess up already small porch and could mess up a support wall.
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Old 12-31-2012, 11:10 AM   #11
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Remodel question.


Bump since I'm off work ha ha.
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Old 02-16-2013, 05:31 PM   #12
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Remodel question.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blondesense
A couple thoughts if I may:
I'd give some thought to the elephant in the room. In other words, the refrigerator in the kitchen. I have the same problem. I have a big black refrigerator in the middle of a long wall and it totally breaks up the room and makes it look smaller. If at all possible I would try to get it on the "south" wall. Maybe where the stove is in the second picture.

Of your two drawings, I like the first one better, it gives more useable space. In the second one, half of what you are adding will be very expensive hallway.

What is this addition going to be used for? If it is going to be family area, maybe you could totally lose the "L" wall around the basement stairs and make it open to the kitchen.
Just painted a kitchen last week with a big black frig. The walls are a deep maroon which toned down the frig. Seemed to help a lot.

Also, we have an old house from the 30's and I think the frig was much smaller or maybe they kept their perishables at a locker somewhere. There just is no good place for a frig. Not fair.
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