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-   -   Recessed Lighting In Basement (http://www.diychatroom.com/f15/recessed-lighting-basement-11260/)

Rifeman 09-04-2007 11:02 AM

Recessed Lighting In Basement
 
Since you are on this subject I will not start a new one, I am planning to remodel my basement and would like to put low wattage Recessed Lights in the Ceiling, my rooms are 26' X 11' and my other room is 33' X 12' and my ceilings are 7'. How many recessed lights do I need in each room?

The 26' X 11' is a Bedroom and also a Office area.

The 33' X 12' is a TV room with a dinning area.

What I would like is the lighting that would not use allot of wattage to save on the electric bill. There is no insulation in the ceiling of my basement. I plan to put paster-board up on the ceiling and walls.

What I would like to say is I am looking to get the most light with the less amount of wattage. :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Please gave me your advise in which way to go.

KUIPORNG 09-04-2007 11:56 AM

you kind of need one to light up every approx. 3 feet in radius circle in my opinion. use those low voltage flourscent light bulb for your voltage concern... if still not ... make 2 switch to control light in alternative order... but basement being light up is very important... install enough lighting .... and regarding how many and where... make it adjust to your physical condition of your joist ... fit a light wherever it is convenient and easy to install... not just dictate by the spacing between each light... but both attributes...

dcd22 09-04-2007 12:03 PM

I read (this was for a kitchen) it is 2 watt's per sq. ft. Dark color's should be 4 watt's per sq. ft.

Of course, they need to be spaced. For that I have read about every 4ft. but the reason for the lighting (task, general) may change that.

KUIPORNG 09-04-2007 12:07 PM

well I didn't go into that technical details... I guess my assumption you use 5" or more lighting device rather than those small ones which you definitely need a lot...

Ron6519 09-05-2007 08:09 AM

Rifeman, since these are multipurpose rooms the lighting layout will differ depending on use. As a rough guideline I would think you need between 12-15 in the 11x26 room and between 18-21 in the 12x 33 room. This is based on a 4" sized can. I like alot of light if the need arises. This way you can adjust the lighting to use.
Ron

Rifeman 09-05-2007 11:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 61398)
Rifeman, since these are multipurpose rooms the lighting layout will differ depending on use. As a rough guideline I would think you need between 12-15 in the 11x26 room and between 18-21 in the 12x 33 room. This is based on a 4" sized can. I like allot of light if the need arises. This way you can adjust the lighting to use.
Ron


Do they make 6 inch sized can?

If so could you go with a combination?

Most differently Low wattage is the way to go Fluorescent. :thumbup: :thumbup:

Ron6519 09-05-2007 12:27 PM

It would be a good idea to go to local lighting store to see what 's available. I'm not familiar with low voltage florescent units.
Ron

Rifeman 09-05-2007 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ron6519 (Post 61442)
It would be a good idea to go to local lighting store to see what 's available. I'm not familiar with low voltage florescent units.
Ron


I will let you know what I find out on these.

What do you think of them if they have them?

You know more than I do. I believe in saving energy and cutting my eclectic bill.

Any ideals on this in lighting and also in heating? I live in Northwest Ohio.
I use Natural Gas Forced Air Furnace ( OHIO GAS Company ).

Big Bob 09-05-2007 12:42 PM

"Do they make 6 inch sized can?
YES
If so could you go with a combination?
YES
Most differently Low wattage is the way to go Fluorescent. :thumbup: :thumbup:
Maybe?"

All depends on the look you want and how many foot candles you want where. Your ceiling height gives you a poor spacing to mounting height ratio. Space them to far apart and you will have pools of light.
That may be the look you want?

If you want efficient even illumination consider good Low profile wrap around surface mount fixtures. Add switching to create various lighting levels.

You may end up with more useful lumens per watt.

The customer is always right.

Rifeman 09-05-2007 07:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Big Bob (Post 61445)
"Do they make 6 inch sized can?
YES
If so could you go with a combination?
YES
Most differently Low wattage is the way to go Fluorescent. :thumbup: :thumbup:
Maybe?"

All depends on the look you want and how many foot candles you want where. Your ceiling height gives you a poor spacing to mounting height ratio. Space them to far apart and you will have pools of light.
That may be the look you want?

No I do not want pools of light. I want a even amount of light. An still cut down on my Electric Bill.

If you want efficient even illumination consider good Low profile wrap around surface mount fixtures. Add switching to create various lighting levels.

Now you are talking and I like what you are saying. Can one use Fluorescent Lighting in the type that I want to use or do I have to go with something that will not look so good?

I know my ceiling is low and that does not help things.

You may end up with more useful lumens per watt.


What would you go with here. You can see what I want, but what I want is not alway the right thing to go with.


The customer is always right.

Not always.

mcvane 09-05-2007 10:08 PM

Ceiling light types
 
I'm not an electrician by any means, but in my observation of lighting, the lowest wattage is obviously the flourescent lights of any kind.

Although the 'in thing' is to buy a compact fluorescent light these days (23 watts to get a decent brightness factor), I've never been a huge fan. I have a couple of nice 24" flourscent light tube fixtures in strategic locations in my basement. They light a lot more and don't use much energy. This is great for an area right above our storage shelves. If you don't mind flourescent tubes, you could setup a lighting environment where the sockets are hidden in the edges of the wall (the light protrudes from the crevices) and the room itself is lit by the flourscents in the walls.

Compact Flourescents save money (yes) but there are issues that you can't put dimmers on them - and they are not as naturally bright.

I have seen some boardrooms/basements with evenly spaced 50 watt halogen bulbs. These are pretty intense lights that do a good lighting job. They can be used with dimmers and tend to bring a nice atmosphere to the room. Great for home theatre rooms...

Anyways, that's my opinion on these types of lights...

KUIPORNG 09-06-2007 08:16 AM

I think the newer Compact Flourescents blub is now as good as regular due to improve in technology ... and Flourescents tube is kind of ugly when compare to recessed light bulb....

Big Bob 09-06-2007 01:26 PM

BB said "The customer is always right."

Rifeman said "Not always."

LOL, The customer may not know what they want, it is their job to get enough information,weigh the various factors, and make an informed buying decision. They may later regret weighing factors with incorrect priorities.
But, at the time they were right.

Now let's help you on this path.

You have advised: "I am planning to remodel my basement and would like to put low wattage Recessed Lights in the Ceiling, my rooms are 26' X 11' and my other room is 33' X 12' and my ceilings are 7'. How many recessed lights do I need in each room?

The 26' X 11' is a Bedroom and also a Office area.

The 33' X 12' is a TV room with a dinning area."

You also advised: " I believe in saving energy and cutting my eclectic bill."

Ron and others have given you great advise:
Ron6519 "It would be a good idea to go to local lighting store to see what 's available. I'm not familiar with low voltage florescent units.
Ron"

Make a layout of the space / include your furniture ( office desk w/ computer ... glare factor.. you will want 70 to 100 ft candles at the work surface) Know your ceiling, wall, and floor finishes.

Take this info to a lighting showroom. A good designer will help you light the tasks at the proper levels, assist you to find the look you want, work with you budget and advise projected energy usage per design layout for your decision.

Good luck, and happy shopping.


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