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Old 12-17-2008, 08:27 AM   #1
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Question on insulating a bathroom


Greetings,

I decided to remodel my master bathroom due to the floor tiles coming up from what seems like a long time leak from before we bought the house. So I've gutted the bathroom down to the 2x4 studs, ceiling joists, and the 1x12's that cover the floor joists. It's just a basic bare unfinished room. I decided that this is one room that I want to start at with for insulating interior walls. I bought some Safe-Touch insulation from Lowe's. (The stuff is a miracle) Now I'm faced with a small problem. I can't remember which side of the wall I put the face of the insulation? Towards the outside of the house or towards the finished walls? (I swore the face goes towards the interior).

Also, there is a LOT of this insulation left over for the walls but it is faced. Can I use faced insulation inside of interior walls? If so, will it matter which side the faces go? Preferably I want to isolate and keep ALL of the moisture in the bathroom if possible so I thought that if it can be used, the faces should go towards the bathroom wall interior.

Thanks in advance.

- JoshinWV

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Old 12-17-2008, 11:03 AM   #2
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Question on insulating a bathroom


Vapour barrier goes on the warm side. You can use it for interior walls but I'd recommend peeling the paper off.

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Old 12-17-2008, 12:22 PM   #3
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Question on insulating a bathroom


It really won't matter since both sides of the wall will be at the same temperature (or at least very close) and will not get below dew point. Any excess moisture in a bathroom needs to be controlled with an exhaust fan. Most thermal insulations will not do much for sound attenuation, but interestingly, Dow claims superior sound absorption with this stuff. I've never used it, but it is supposed to be available unfaced. If you plan to add it on top of existing insulation in an attic, then by all means remove or slash the vapor retarder.

Last edited by Maintenance 6; 12-17-2008 at 12:38 PM.
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