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Old 10-01-2008, 05:12 PM   #1
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


I would like to plug a hole in a polyurethane shower pan. It's a very long story. I need a product that will adhere to the existing pan. I have to drill a hole in the bottom to inject construction adhesive for filling a void. The flex is to much for tile, and I"m worried about cracking grout.

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Old 10-01-2008, 05:21 PM   #2
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


There's a lot of people trained to do just what you say. They color match and when done it's nearly invisible. Contact your pan MFG, they should be able to tell you who in your area is trained for such a thing...if they can't tell you, call someone like Kohler and ask them...they'll know.

The bigger question though is using construction adhesive as structural fill? It sounds like a larger accident waiting to happen....care to share additional details?

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Old 10-01-2008, 05:59 PM   #3
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


When installing the pan in a morter bed, there was a void along one side towards the end. I was going to use something to fill the void that I could inject under the pan to keep it from flexing. I haven't drilled the hole yet. This was the only way I could think of for fixing the problem. The flex is around 1/8" at least. Removing the pan is not an option. Do you have another product in mind like liquid nails or similar?
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Old 10-01-2008, 07:16 PM   #4
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


I just had someone tell me of two products, injectafloor for putting under the pan and vulkem for patching the shower pan. Has anyone heard of these products?
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Old 10-02-2008, 08:21 AM   #5
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


This is just the pan that's flexing? Are you putting tile on the pan? Is the flex on the edge where the tile comes down to the lip of the pan? I'm not clear what's going on.

Can you get up to the pan from the basement or crawl space? Drill a small hole in the sub-floor and put thin-set up from the bottom. Vulkum is polyurathane caulk...wouldn't do it...it will most likely leak over time, don't want a leak there.

Short of replacing or pulling up the existing pan...your options are really limited. If the guys at John Bridge don't have a fully qualified fix...it's probably not going to work.
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Old 10-02-2008, 04:50 PM   #6
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


yes the pan flexes on one side about 1/8 plus. When I step down on the bottom and it flexes the side of the pan pulls in away from the studs. To my way of thinking this is to much flex for putting tile on the floor and up the sides. The pan sits on a concrete slab. There is no way to get underneath it. I'm going to fill this void one way or another. Do you really think that polyurethane caulk or vulkem would leak over time?
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Old 10-03-2008, 07:42 AM   #7
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


There's no way I'd rely on the caulk fill. It's not worth the risk to the rest of the structure down the road.

So if you have the pan in, I assume you are near ready to tile, that means the wall is relatively unfinished right? Concrete board behind your tile? Rip/cut off the bottom of the concrete board shove mortar mix in from the side, replace the concrete board and move on with life. Less than $20 in materials, and some time.
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Old 10-03-2008, 08:01 AM   #8
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


Very good advice from Rippy.

Yes, sealant will leak over time. A shower is a big investment, and any corners you cut or mistakes you make will show up as leaks, mold, and deterioration.
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Old 10-03-2008, 12:10 PM   #9
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


Thanks for responding. I'm including a photo of the pan install. As you can see no cement board yet. Where the arrow is, is where the void is located. There is no way to insert any substance under the pan short of drilling a hole at that point and injecting something under pressure to fill the void. I was going to use a product called injectafloor. Then seal the hole with (vulkem?).
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Old 10-06-2008, 08:38 AM   #10
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


How far in does the floor appear to flex? At the wall, 2", 4"? What's on the other side of the wall? It appears to be a non insulated space, no? Couldn't you drill through the bottom plate and force some modified thin-set into the area? I've used a plain zip lock bag loaded with thin-set, clip the corner stick it in the hole and squeeze the bag. Assuming it's a pretty thin mix, you can make enough pressure to force it in behind the pan. If you have the hole(s) in the right location, you can get the mud where you need to. Can you chisel out the bottom plate in the arrowed area to give you're self some working room from the top back.

I promise I'll not say it again...DO NOT CAULK THE POTENTIAL HOLE, unless that is a manufacturer's specific recommendation! At this point "hoping" to get a good seal is no way to go. Since you're determined to poke a hole in the pan...at least check with the supplier/MFG on the proper methods of repair, this would not be the first time a pan would have a hole in it and they should be able to guide you to an approved method, who knows maybe your right...but check with them first. Good luck to you and the soon to be drilled "vulkem hole", your not a Trekkie are you?
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Old 10-06-2008, 01:54 PM   #11
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


Thanks for responding. I'm not sure what a trekkie is, enlighten me. To answer your questions. When putting weight on the side/bottom area it flexes from 1/8" to 3/16". The wall is the outside wall, which is stucco. The pan sits up against the plate and down on the concrete floor. I can't get under the pan, I tried. There is no hole yet. I'm currently searching the internet for an adhesive that will seal polyurethane. The tech reps at the company were very hesitant about recommending anything. I've contacted 3M Co., hoping they have a sealent that will work.The options are narrowing down. This situation will be solved. Thanks.
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Old 10-06-2008, 02:27 PM   #12
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


Quote:
Originally Posted by rolls831 View Post
Thanks for responding. I'm not sure what a trekkie is, enlighten me.
Sorry -- poor attempt at levity....The soon to be Vulkem Hole had the Trekkie'esq sound to it. I'll snap out of it soon.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by rolls831 View Post
...The tech reps at the company were very hesitant about recommending anything. I've contacted 3M Co., hoping they have a sealent that will work.
If that doesn't tell you something....
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Old 10-06-2008, 03:13 PM   #13
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


I'm just a retired guy with limited income trying to upgrade my 35yr. old house. Sometimes I feel over my head with situations like these, but the internet has lots of very smart and helpful people who are willing to help. I really appreciate this form of communication. Any more info to pass my way would be an asset. Thanks again.
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Old 10-06-2008, 04:21 PM   #14
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


You know I too appreciate this method...and like you value the heck out of it.

Can you drill with a hole saw or large drill bit right next to the pan where the squishyness is? Or at least close enough that you could take another small drill bit at an angle to get close enough to get some thin-set in there.

I just talked to a co-worker who got his PhD in Polymer Science, and he said a polyurethane epoxy used in marine applications could work. Drill your hole, fill in under the pan with thinset up to the pan bottom not the top of the pan but the bottom. Pour the epoxy into the hole flush with the surface. If you could some how come up with a thin sheet of polyurethane, after the plug has cured, it could be epoxied over the top of the plug.

I don't know where you would get that stuff...but google can be your friend to locate something like this. Promise me that IF you choose to drill the pan, that you will do a leak test before moving on....will ya?
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Old 10-06-2008, 07:08 PM   #15
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plugging a hole in polyurethane?


I can drill right above the void. I believe I will only have to drill one 3/8" or 1/2" hole. The pan has ridges underneath which set on the concrete, with gaps about 4' wide. The area is about 8"x12". The marine epoxy is a good idea. I've contacted an east coast marine mfg., waiting for a reply. Also contacted 3M co. polyurethane division, waiting for reply. I am a positive mind. Yes, I will give this a good test before going further. Thanks again. I will keep you posted. You never know when this situation will pop up again.

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