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Old 05-13-2014, 06:39 PM   #31
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you could do knee walls off the left and right sides with bookshelves and then put nice decorative caps on the posts. would still keep it open but make it more focal.

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Old 05-13-2014, 07:37 PM   #32
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you could do knee walls off the left and right sides with bookshelves and then put nice decorative caps on the posts. would still keep it open but make it more focal.
If it's too costly to remove them, that's likely what I would do. Hopefully, they are just decorative and we can knock them out on our own, or at least get a header to replace them. My husband has two requirements for our house; a garage and large, open spaces. Can't argue with him on that! We've been living in a 600 sq ft house with two toddlers for the past year, and expecting our third. Gimme some floor space!!!!

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Old 05-13-2014, 07:42 PM   #33
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If it's too costly to remove them, that's likely what I would do. Hopefully, they are just decorative and we can knock them out on our own, or at least get a header to replace them. My husband has two requirements for our house; a garage and large, open spaces. Can't argue with him on that! We've been living in a 600 sq ft house with two toddlers for the past year, and expecting our third. Gimme some floor space!!!!
maybe something that looks similar to this. see how the poles have a nice looking cap on them, makes it look much much nicer.

http://mitrecontracting.typepad.com/...5c8d970c-popup
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:07 AM   #34
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That's a solution I could live with
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Old 05-14-2014, 06:24 AM   #35
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For now.....live in it.....after about 6 months the 'don't like' list is going to be a lot longer....
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:17 AM   #36
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I also think if you put down one flooring throughout, lose the paneling and paint it all one color, those posts might almost disappear by themselves.
IMHO, that separates the areas more than the posts.
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:40 AM   #37
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For now.....live in it.....after about 6 months the 'don't like' list is going to be a lot longer....
So I fear, but that's the nature of a DIY'er! lol

In truth, the kitchen is smaller than I prefer, but is tolerable, and I have some ideas to help it feel bigger. The bathrooms also have tile halfway up the walls that I'm hoping to cover with pvc material beadboard. I'm sure there will be more changes I'll want to make, but so far the posts are the only thing I vehemently dislike.

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I also think if you put down one flooring throughout, lose the paneling and paint it all one color, those posts might almost disappear by themselves.
IMHO, that separates the areas more than the posts.
I agree; but my husband wants carpet and I prefer hardwood. I suggested we could do wood flooring with really large rugs. I'll probably just paint over the paneling, and the trim. Brown trim...:shakeshead:
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Old 05-14-2014, 09:45 AM   #38
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Look up 'roof truss' or 'web truss'----

That house has a hip roof---I doubt if it has trusses---carpenter built (stick built) is most likely---

There are ways to add a beam inside the attic to support the ceiling--

The house looks nice--I hope it works out for you---
If it were mine the post would go. I agree with Mike, the support beam can be from above the ceiling instead of under the ceiling. It would be tough to get a beam that large up in the attic but it is doable. The ends of the beam would be supported on existing walls and would for sure need to be supported all the way to the ground.

Looking at the front elevation, it looks like the right side of the house is on a conventional foundation, see the vents. The left side of the house is close to the ground so it is possible it is on a slab on that end but not necessarily. If the living area is on a slab that could be some problems supporting the ends of the beam if you decided to go that way.

Unless the foundation people build a ground girder under that weight bearing wall, (if that area is on a slab) that concrete would have to be reinforced to hold the pressure of the end supports of the beam if you decide to install one. If that area is on a conventional foundation it would be a lot easier and less expensive to support the ends of the beam.

We have a stick built ranch style home (not saying your's is stick built). We took the wall between the living area and kitchen out, as you are wanting to do. I supported the ceilings from above with a beam as suggested here. We did luck out because the walls which support the ends of the beam are supported all the way to the ground. We are on a conventional foundation.

Congratulations on the new addition to your family.

Added note, if you decide to not remove the posts, there are ways to make that area a lot more attractive with columns, I will see if I can find a picture or two to show you what I am talking about.
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Old 05-14-2014, 10:00 AM   #39
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You can do a search on column divide between living area and kitchen and hit images and you can see many examples of how you could rework that area and for less money IMHO. Here are a few examples of how this area could be addressed, just to give you an idea,
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Old 05-14-2014, 07:59 PM   #40
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If it were mine the post would go. I agree with Mike, the support beam can be from above the ceiling instead of under the ceiling. It would be tough to get a beam that large up in the attic but it is doable. The ends of the beam would be supported on existing walls and would for sure need to be supported all the way to the ground.

Looking at the front elevation, it looks like the right side of the house is on a conventional foundation, see the vents. The left side of the house is close to the ground so it is possible it is on a slab on that end but not necessarily. If the living area is on a slab that could be some problems supporting the ends of the beam if you decided to go that way.

Unless the foundation people build a ground girder under that weight bearing wall, (if that area is on a slab) that concrete would have to be reinforced to hold the pressure of the end supports of the beam if you decide to install one. If that area is on a conventional foundation it would be a lot easier and less expensive to support the ends of the beam.

We have a stick built ranch style home (not saying your's is stick built). We took the wall between the living area and kitchen out, as you are wanting to do. I supported the ceilings from above with a beam as suggested here. We did luck out because the walls which support the ends of the beam are supported all the way to the ground. We are on a conventional foundation.

Congratulations on the new addition to your family.

Added note, if you decide to not remove the posts, there are ways to make that area a lot more attractive with columns, I will see if I can find a picture or two to show you what I am talking about.
Lots of good information, Big Jim; thank you!

I believe I saw a crawlspace door on the back of the house, so I don't *think* it's a slab foundation. (Bear with me as I'm still familiarizing myself with the terminology here.) If it is a hip roof, could a beam still be run through the attic?

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You can do a search on column divide between living area and kitchen and hit images and you can see many examples of how you could rework that area and for less money IMHO. Here are a few examples of how this area could be addressed, just to give you an idea,
Those images are what I have in mind for option #2, if total removal isn't possible or affordable, but I would try my darndest to find a way to widen the space between them, which seems like it would be just as much effort as taking them out. Or am I misunderstanding the concept of bearing weight points?
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Old 05-14-2014, 08:48 PM   #41
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If it is all on a conventional foundation it will make it much easier and less expense to install a beam, be it over or under the ceiling joists. It still hasn't been determined if you have trusses or not. If you do have trusses you got it made, all you would have to do is take the columns out and open it up without a beam.

The hip roof has nothing to do with being able to have a beam over the ceiling joists, it only makes it harder to get the beam into the attic. Even with a gable roof it would still be a task to get the beam up there, but it is doable.

If you do go the route of a beam under or over, you will need an expert to spec out the size beam you would need.
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Old 05-16-2014, 04:16 PM   #42
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Well, we finally saw the house, and not that it matters, but the columns and beam above are metal.

I say it doesn't matter because the entire house was a money pit. I wasn't even mad; just impressed someone could let a house get into such bad shape. Truly misleading listing; should have a disclaimer on it, like "Handy Man Special!" or else come down in price about $50k...

Thanks for your advice, everyone!
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Old 05-16-2014, 04:35 PM   #43
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Glad that you kept us up to date on this.
Saddened that it ain't what you need or want.

As they say CAVEAT EMPTOR.

Am happy to have helped you dream at least.


Keep on keepin on, you will find your dream home somewhere.



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Old 05-16-2014, 05:26 PM   #44
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Thanks!

Hopefully something new pops up; else we may have to start looking at foreclosures...
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Old 05-17-2014, 07:30 AM   #45
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just impressed someone could let a house get into such bad shape. Truly misleading listing!
thats nothing. i looked at houses that i was surprised that they were still standing.

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